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Using Writing In Mathematic

Using Writing In Mathematic
Using Writing In Mathematics This strand provides a developmental model for incorporating writing into a math class. The strand includes specific suggestions for managing journals, developing prompts for writing, and providing students with feedback on their writing. In addition, the site includes two sample lessons for introducing students to important ideas related to writing about their mathematical thinking. Teaching Strategies For Incorporating Writing Into Math Class: Moving From Open-Ended Questions To Math Concepts Starting Out Gently with Affective, Open-Ended Prompts Writing about thinking is challenging. Begin with affective, open-ended questions about students' feelings. Have students write a "mathography"-a paragraph or so in which they describe their feelings about and experiences in math, both in and out of school. Encourage students to keep their pencils moving. Try requiring 20 words per answer, even if they have to copy the same words again to reach 20. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 1. Related:  Math Tools

Kay Toliver: Math and Communication Math and Communication by Kay Toliver Before I taught mathematics in grades 7 and 8 at East Harlem Tech, I taught all of the other elementary grades, starting with the first and gradually moving up through each grade, one at a time. It may have been this background which led me to want to use mathematics instruction to develop my students' communication skills, because I saw that, for all students in all grades, communication skills were among the most important abilities that I could help them to develop. Over the years I have learned that there are two sides to this coin. Not only can I use math class to develop children's abilities to speak, read, write and listen, but by stressing these communication activities I am able to be a better mathematics teacher. By encouraging students to speak up in class, to explain their reasoning, and to define the words that we are using, I learn a great deal about how well they understand the lesson. Make it easy for students to speak up.

Writing in Mathematics Featured Topic: Writing in Math Class Teachers incorporate writing in math class to help students reflect on their learning, deepen their understanding of important concepts by explaining and providing examples of those concepts, and make important connections to real-life applications of the math they are learning. Teachers use the writing assignments to assess student understanding of important concepts, student proficiency in explaining and using those concepts and each student's attitude toward learning mathematics. Writing in mathematics is a win-win for both teacher and student. Although it may be difficult to introduce this practice, it is well worth the effort. Look for simple ways to incorporate short writings throughout daily lessons and longer writings over the course of weeks or math units. Getting Started with Math Writing Often students who have difficulty writing in math class have less difficulty telling the teacher what they think. The basic steps of Think-Pair-Share are:

Class dissection: 'Lesson study' aims to improve teaching In the sunlit library at Jorge Prieto Elementary on Chicago’s’ northwest side, an experiment is underway. A provisional classroom has been set up. A white board sits at the front of the room, and 20 eighth graders are seated at library tables. Math teacher Michael Hock is giving a lesson about the distributive property. Scattered throughout the room are some 30 other teachers. “What is the area of the garden?” Nestor answers the question, and the 30 adults, including visiting teachers from Japan, scribble notes. The exercise is called “lesson study.” Here’s how it works: teachers come up with a detailed lesson plan and explain ahead of time to colleagues the goals of the lesson. “[We’ve been] doing lesson study more than 100 years in Japan,” says Toshiakira Fujii, a premier professor of math education in Japan who was among those teachers observing at Prieto. Fujii says Japanese teachers see lesson study as a proving ground, a way to shine in front of their colleagues.

MATH WORDS, AND SOME OTHER WORDS OF INTEREST If you have suggestions or comments E-mail to: Pat Ballew ".................... Read Pat's Blogs here to read Romanian translation of this web page (by Web Geek Science) A personal selection of outstanding reads for Students and Teachers.. <A HREF=" <A HREF=" To focus search on these pages use the advanced search and enter pballew.net as the domain/site. Math Tales from the Spring Learning Math Through Telling Stories Tuesday, July 3, 2012 From the University of Western Ontario: “Education professor George Gadanidis is attempting to revolutionize the way math is taught in elementary classrooms by applying principles from the world of art. ‘A typical solution to helping kids learn math is making math easy to learn,’ Gadanidis said. ‘But you go watch a movie, if it is easy to learn, you will make predictions for the ending and always be right, [and that's boring]. Movies work to teach you something when you make guesses but you are surprised. Gadanidis and his research team developed a framework for approaching typical math problems in an atypical way—lessons are tackled through storytelling, drama and even music. By way of example, he offered a different approach to teaching elementary students infinity, a concept not taught until high school. I love this—borrowing the richness and unexpectedness of art to communicate the wonder of math to kids—and giving them a good story to tell about it.

illustrativemathematics Illustrated Standards Count to 100 by ones and by tens. (see illustrations) Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1). Write numbers from 0 to 20. Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality. When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object. Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger. Count to answer “how many?” Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies. Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals. Fluently add and subtract within 5. Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes.

Art with Mrs. Nguyen: Radial Paper Relief Sculptures (4th/5th) For this lesson we began by taking about what symmetry is and the difference between linear symmetry (1 line of symmetry) and radial symmetry (more than 1 line of symmetry). Then we talked about what a sculpture is (a piece of artwork you can see from all sides - it is 3-dimensional) and what a relief "sculpture" is (a piece of artwork that has depth on the surface but is not meant to be seen from all sides). Once students understood the principles behind radial symmetry and sculpture we began creating our very own radial paper relief sculptures! Students started by folding a piece of 12"x12" black construction paper diagonally both ways and vertical and horizontally (to create an 'X' crease and a '+' crease). Making these creases makes creating a radial design SO much easier because it gives you guidelines to work with. My kids absolutely LOVED this project!

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