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People webs: pattern: chunky circle scarf

People webs: pattern: chunky circle scarf
i said to myself, i need a big chunky circular scarf to wear all the time.. and this is what came of it. i am putting this grey one in my etsy shop, and also, here is the pattern: ( this pattern is intended for personal use only, thank you! ) chunky circle scarf you will need: 2 skeins of worsted weight yarn (i used caron simply soft) using both strands at once throughout, otherwise you could use bulky weight yarn 10 mm crochet hook , or any large hook (i crochet quite loosely, so if you don't, a hook larger than the one i used will work better) large needle for weaving in ends stitches used: ch: chain sc: single crochet dc: double crochet dc4tog: double crochet 4 stitches together: yarn over once, insert the hook into the stitch, draw up 1 loop (3 loops on hook), yarn over, draw through 2 loops (2 loops remaining) to finish the dc7together, yarn over once, and draw through all 8 loops at once. gauge: 4 rows are a little over three inches tall, finished size: about 60 inches around, and 10 inches wide

colour in a simple life Handprint shirt DIY Fringe Scarf | Lakeland Local Everyone needs a go-to fringe scarf in their fashion repertoire. Here’s an easy way to make your own. What You Will Need: -Old T-Shirt -Good Scissors Step 1: Go through your old T-shirts and find a daring print or color combo. For a cleaner look, choose a solid. Step 2: Cut horizontally across the shirt, just below the armholes, to create a rectangular tube. Step 3: Working your way around the tube, make a series of vertical cuts that extend from the raw edge upward. Step 4: Tug down on each strand to elongate it. photo credit: Cathy Hayes for Lakeland Local

how (and why) to block crochet and knit projects {tutorial} Until recently, I had never taken the time to block a crochet project. Why? Because I didn't have a fancy blocking board (and didn't want to spend the money on one). But then I finished a beautiful infinity scarf for a friend (found the free pattern here), and it just didn't look as good as the picture! It didn't lay flat and it was hard to see how pretty the pattern stitch was. Blocking a crochet or knit piece gives it shape and sets the stitches in that shape. Here's my latest crochet project before (remember this looks-like-knit crochet baby blanket pattern from the other day?). And the after. How to Block a Crochet or Knit Project Supplies: *Finished fiber project *Bare mattress *Spray bottle full of water *Pearl head pins *Plastic wrap or plastic garbage sack larger than your project 1. 2. 3. Use a ruler to help you keep it straight if you need to. 4. Repeat until the entire project is shaped and pinned down. 5. Once it's dry, it's blocked and you can remove the pins.

14 Butterfly Crochet Patterns for Spring There are currently no images from other crafters. close Terms & Conditions You must enter into this Agreement if you want to submit digital images or other content to Prime Publishing through Sharing Customer Images (the "Service"). 1) Eligibility. 2) Definitions. 3) License Grant for Materials. 4) Removal of Materials. 5) License for Name, Trademarks and Likenesses. 6) Specifications and Guidelines. 7) Representations, Warranties and Indemnities. 8) Restrictions. 9) No Obligation. 10) Changes to Agreement. 11) Prime Publishing Intellectual Property. 12) Communications. 13) Waiver. 14) Disclaimer. 15) Miscellaneous. Sharing Your Own Images Who can share images? You! What should I share? Please share images that will help other visitors. Do include captions for your images. What shouldn't I share? Behave as if you were a guest at a friend's dinner party: please treat the Prime Publishing community with respect. The same guidelines apply to your captions and notes. Where will my image appear?

How to tie a Four-in-Hand | 37 Ways to Tie a Scarf | by Scarves STEP 1 Fold the scarf in half and place the scarf around the back of your neck with a loop on one side. STEP 2 Pull one of the ends through the loop. STEP 3 Twist the loop. STEP 4 Pull the other end of the scarf through the loop. STEP 5 Adjust the scarf for fit so it lies flat on your chest.

Button Statement Rings It’s September and that means it’s time to add another statement piece to your collection…. obviously! I heart almost every piece Nicole Richie designs for House Of Harlow 1960, especially her oversized rings. As amazing as these rings are they’re also an easy DIY. Buttons, buttons everywhere!! Materials: Buttons, Clippers, Glue, Rings With Flat Tops (available at the jewelry supply store) Use your clippers to remove the shank from the back of the button. Once you’ve made the back of the button flat, use an ample amount of glue to secure the ring to the back of the button. Here’s another hint: If you can’t find a flat ring base, Ring Pops are a fun alternative. Once the base has dried, glue on the button. I now thing I have enough new statement rings to get me through the month.

How to Finish Crochet Blankets It’s been a big week here with our Paper Plane Party and a school disco on top of the usual after school routines. But each evening I’ve looked forward to sitting and working a little more on my rainbow crochet blanket. I decided to go with very simple, but I’m already thinking about whether to add an edging once it is finished. So I’ve been looking at edging tutorials to finish my crochet blanket and just had to share them with you. All of these include tutorials to make them. {Double V Edging from Bunny Mummy} {Easy scalloped edging by Olav’s World} {This edging is on a pillowcase but it would also be lovely on a blanket from You Go Girl!} {A cute bobble edging from Heidi Bears} I think the hardest questions when the time comes for my edging won’t be the design, but what colour? 16K Flares16K10169162435--×16K Flares

How to Clean Using Homemade Crochet Designs: 15 Home Organization Patterns There are currently no images from other crafters. close Terms & Conditions You must enter into this Agreement if you want to submit digital images or other content to Prime Publishing through Sharing Customer Images (the "Service"). As used in this Agreement, "we" or "Prime Publishing" means Prime Publishing, LLC. and "you" means the individual or entity submitting materials to Prime Publishing. Any individual or entity that wants to use the Service must accept the terms of this Agreement without change. 1) Eligibility. 2) Definitions. 3) License Grant for Materials. 4) Removal of Materials. 5) License for Name, Trademarks and Likenesses. 6) Specifications and Guidelines. 7) Representations, Warranties and Indemnities. 8) Restrictions. 9) No Obligation. 10) Changes to Agreement. 11) Prime Publishing Intellectual Property. 12) Communications. 13) Waiver. 14) Disclaimer. 15) Miscellaneous. Sharing Your Own Images Who can share images? You! What should I share? What shouldn't I share?

DIY Skirt Getting our craft on again :) My sister Ann and I always like to do a crafty project when we get together, so this time is was a simple homemade skirt. We used this tutorial and it was really straightforward. One helpful hint: when it says to stretch the elastic while you are sewing the fabric on, do it! It will allow the skirt to fit better and more comfortably. You can also make one for a smaller cutie pie in your life or make some great baby shower gifts! beltmaking 101 Finally–the long-awaited beltmaking tutorial! way I make my fabric-covered belts has been learned from a mix of trial-and-error and vintage manuals. The supplies are simple, and making a simple pass-through belt is quite easy. I have, however, included instructions for how to add a pronged buckle to a belt and add eyelets. Supplies: 1″ wide stiff belting (available at JoAnns), 1/4 yard fabric at least 45″ wide, buckle for 1″ belt (see sources at the end), pattern paper, thread, scissors, ruler, pins. Begin by measuring your waist and adding 6″ to 8″ inches to the length (I tend to err on the side of more, especially for a belt using a pronged buckle). Cut the belting the length of your waist plus the extra. Using the paper pattern, cut one layer of your fabric. Fold the fabric around the belting, wrong sides out. Gently work the seam to the center of the belting width, and press seam open. Remove belting and turn the fabric right side out. Reinsert the belting into the fabric tube.

Rainbow Stripe Crochet Blanket My very talented friend Miss P was making this gorgeous rainbow blanket when I was at Creative Craft Retreat last year. She is the fastest crocheter I have ever met and doesn’t even need to look at she crochets. We have shared many a craft morning where I am amazed at how much she gets done without even looking. She can make anything out of crochet! Miss P is a fabulous teacher and a mum to two lovely girls. How to Crochet a Rainbow Stripe Blanket Start with a chain of the width you want your blanket with an even number of stitches. In each colour crochet: 1 row double crochet1 row half treble1 row treble1 row: 2 treble, 2 chain (start these rows with 2 chain, 1 treble, 2 chain; finish these rows with 2 treble)1 row treble1 row half treble1 row double The ends of rows and turning: If you are about to go into a double chain row, add one chain stitch as you turn your work.If you are about to go into a treble or half treble row, add 2 chain stitches as you turn. More of my crochet projects:

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