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How To Occupy

How To Occupy
Related:  Movement Building

What's Stopping More of Us From Being Environmentalists and Feminists? Canadian researchers report people hold negative views of political and social activists, and their unwillingness to associate with such people dampens the likelihood of changing their behavior. Why don’t people behave in more environmentally friendly ways? New research presents one uncomfortable answer: They don’t want to be associated with environmentalists. That’s the conclusion of troubling new research from Canada, which similarly finds support for feminist goals is hampered by a dislike of feminists. Participants held strongly negative stereotypes about such activists, and those feelings reduced their willingness “to adopt the behaviors that these activities promoted,” reports a research team led by University of Toronto psychologist Nadia Bashir. “By aggressively promoting change and advocating unconventional practices, activists become associated with hostile militancy and unconventionality or eccentricity.”

The Occupy.Network Tools for a Better Future Neat Stuff Ecstasy Drug-Crazed Ravers Are Like Chemical Buddhas Published on April 4th, 2014 | by Jason Louv Ecstasy drug-fueled Dutch ravers are by turns idiotic and profound in this hilarious video This video (via the Dutch magazine Flabber) captures partygoers out of their skulls on Ecstasy at Thunderdome, a hardcore techno / gabber festival that [&hellip... Environment & Health When Monsanto Had Its Own Disneyland Exhibit Published on April 2nd, 2014 | by Jason Louv Remembering the Monsanto-sponsored exhibit that touted Better Living Through Chemistry to a generation of American children, 1955-1966 Pliant, malleable, innocent, so trusting: This is the American mass mind, the clay that corporations and advertisers manipulate every [&hellip... ‘Raised by Wolves’: Disturbing, Moving Look at Homeless Youth 5 Countries That are Throwing Monsanto Out on its Ass Published on April 1st, 2014 | by Jason Louv Read ‘The Key’, Grant Morrison’s New Web Comic for the BBC Magick & Spirituality

Occupytalk.org Two Years After the Eviction of OWS, Here's 5 People Keeping the Movement Alive by Kathleen Ann Bradley Two years ago today, when Occupy Wall Street was evicted from Zuccotti Park, many wondered what was next for the movement. Two years later, we profile five projects that got their starts in the encampments and are still making change today. posted Nov 15, 2013 It was a cold night in late January 2012. No one knew where the movement was going and what it was going to do next He was one of the small army of Occupy Wall Streeters who had been driven from the park on November 15—two years ago today. After protesters like him were evicted, no one knew where the movement was going and what it was going to do next. One way to get a handle on what became of the Occupy movement is to track the continuing work of its participants, five of whom we've profiled here. Laurie Wen Healthcare for the 99% "That is still the mission of the group," she says. Physicians for a National Health Program continues to advocate for putting human needs first, she says. Tim Franzen Occupy Our Homes Atlanta Grace Davie

Occupy Wall Street Chicago Rising! — www.thenation A resurgent protest culture fights back against Rahm Emanuel’s austerity agenda. Karen Lewis, center, president of the CTU is joined by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, left, and United States Representative Bobby Rush, right, during a demonstration and march over the a plan to close fifty-four Chicago Public Schools through Chicago's downtown Wednesday, March 27, 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast) On a sunny saturday this past May, far down on the city’s black South Side where corner stores house their cashiers behind bulletproof plexiglass, about 150 activists assembled at Jesse Owens Community Academy. In just a few days, Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s appointed Board of Education would vote on the largest simultaneous school closing in recent history. Owens, along with fifty-three other public schools, was on the chopping block. We Recommend If cab drivers in Chicago win their lawsuit to become employees of the city, their jobs will become a lot less terrible. About the Author Rick Perlstein

OCCUPY.NET WIKI 4 Principles For Creating Change, And 4 Barriers That Make It Harder Many people now are struggling to make change; to drive social or environmental impact whether they are social entrepreneurs or people working from within organizations to make a difference. In this piece, we wanted to focus on thinking about how communities of change makers can thrive. It’s not enough for change making to be the sole remit of a handful of do-gooders or NGOs. By highlighting some of the barriers and core principles that are vital to the success of a world in which everyone is a change maker, we hope to begin to mainstream the art of change making and destroy the social entrepreneur’s monopoly on social change. Barrier 1: Experts As Idols Too often change making is outsourced to experts or social entrepreneurs rather than community members. Barrier 2: Conditions Of Problem Solving Are Overlooked Much of the time, we are quick to jump to tactical problem solving without fully reflecting on whether the conditions for it are put in place. Barrier 4: Learning Is One to One

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