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Rhizomatic Learning – Why we teach?

Rhizomatic Learning – Why we teach?
It’s my week at #change11. My topic? Rhizomatic Learning. Rhizomatic learning is a way of thinking about learning based on ideas described by Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari in a thousand plateaus. A rhizome, sometimes called a creeping rootstalk, is a stem of a plant that sends out roots and shoots as it spreads. It is an image used by D&G to describe the way that ideas are multiple, interconnected and self-relicating. I’ve been talking about rhizomes and learning for about five years now. Why do we teach? Why do we teach? What does successful learning look like? the rhizome pertains to a map that must be produced, constructed, a map that is always detachable, connectible, reversible, modifiable, and has multiple entryways and exits and its own lines of flight. It is that map that I think successful learning looks like. Sounds a bit like networked learning…? What does a successful learner look like? How do we structure successful learning? Activity.

http://davecormier.com/edblog/2011/11/05/rhizomatic-learning-why-learn/

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Questions about rhizomatic learning This is an open letter to Keith Hamon. Since it is open anyone is welcome to respond, but the thoughts here have been prompted by contact with Keith. (For source of image – see References) Hi Keith – I have been thinking about your invitation to discuss some of the ideas around rhizomatic learning with you further. I am still finding it difficult to get my head round it – but maybe that’s because I haven’t read enough of ‘A Thousand Plateaus’. Rhizomatic Education : Community as Curriculum Below is my paper as it appears in Innovate – Journal of Online Education. Many, many thanks to the fine folks there for all their help. Note: this journal has since gone ‘out of print’. the originals are still available at archive.org but i have adjusted the links here so that they continue to work. The truths of which the masses now approve are the very truths that the fighters at the outposts held to in the days of our grandfathers. We fighters at the outposts nowadays no longer approve of them; and I do not believe there is any other well-ascertained truth except this, that no community can live a healthy life if it is nourished only on such old marrowless truths. —Henrik Ibsen, An Enemy of the People (1882/2000, IV.i)

Characteristics of Millennial Students: What Professors Need to Know The first indication that the Millennial Generation may be different from previous generations is to consider how many different names we have for the generation and the people who belong to it. They’re referred to as Generation Y, Nexters, Baby Boom Echo Generation, Echo Boomers, Digital Natives, Generation Next, Generation Me and, of course, Millennials. If nothing else, they’re one of the most studied generations. And while it’s important we don’t stereotype an entire generation of individuals, the large body of research on those born between 1981 and 1999 (or there about) has provided us with unique insights into their learning preferences, behaviors and attitudes. Christy Price, EdD, a psychology professor at Dalton State College, became interested in Millennial learners when she noticed a gap between students’ expectation for success and the effort they put forth in the classroom (Price, 2009).

Books with tips on Learning Languages TESL-EJ publishes academic titles in electronic format. Our books are copyrighted and registered with the U.S. Library of Congress. If you have an idea for a book, please refer to the guidelines at the bottom of this page. Open education: 5.5 Rhizomatic learning - OpenLearn - Open University - H817_1 Embracing Uncertainty: Rhizomatic Learning in Formal Education Dave Cormier Embracing uncertainty was a presentation that I gave in New Delhi a couple of weeks ago.

Rhizomatic Learning – A Pedagogy of Risk February 16, 2014 by jennymackness (Source of image: On Twitter Nick Kearney asked “Are we reaching an understanding of what ‘rhizomatic’ praxis might involve?” I’m not sure. I think we probably still need a clearer view of what happens or can happen, in terms of learning, in the open space for learning that will be created by taking a rhizomatic approach. An open learning environment of the type we have experienced in #rhizo14 (Dave Cormier’s open online course on rhizomatic learning), is associated with ambiguity and uncertainty and puts learners in a liminal space – an in-between-space – between mastery and troublesome knowledge.

What skills should we be teaching to future-proof an education? Some time last year I spent quite a bit of time reflecting on what skills we could be focusing on in higher education to “future-proof” a degree. What skills will stay relevant no matter what future careers look like? There are two frameworks used and endorsed in K-12 education: Partnership for 21st Century Skills and Equipped for the Future. I felt that the lists not quite right for adults that are returning or seeking an education. Here is the list that I developed, and a link to the Prezi that includes many video resources that correspond with the skills. Focus

Logical Fallacies and How to Spot Them Logical Fallacies and How to Spot Them In the Evolution vs. Creationism debate, it is important to be able to spot all the logical fallacies that Creationists tend to throw around. This essay covers many bare essentials of logical thinking, as well as ways to critically evaluate an argument. Uncategorized In the last two blog posts i’ve been talking about something I’ve alternately called ‘caring about learning’ and ‘student engagement’. I have said a variety of irritating things about the education system over the years – “i don’t believe in content” – being my favourite, but those conversations only progress when people already agree with me, or if i’m in a class where students believe they have to at least hear me out. I’m looking to take the next step in that process.

etmooc: Rhizomatic learning in philosophy courses I recently watched Dave Cormier‘s “Intro to rhizomatic learning” presentation as part of my participation in etmooc. Here, I’ll explain what rhizomatic learning is as briefly as I can, discuss what it might look like in a university level philosophy course, and ask a few questions. In the next post I explore a possible critique that I’ve been mulling over. I’m not just assuming here that rhizomatic learning is a good thing (though obviously I find it interesting enough to write about), but rather just at this point examining the idea to help me better work to evaluate it. Life in a 21st-Century English Class Teaching Strategies Creating a Common Craft-style video is part of the classroom assignment. By Shelley Wright

21 Brilliant Productivity Tools Every College Student Must Use If you ask a college student about productivity, he won't have much to say. And you really can't blame him. He leads a dynamic life where academics and fun go hand in hand, with the latter becoming a more important activity most of the times. Rhizo14 Doing this course I've put together a blog post to give you a sense of 'where' the course is happening and what you might like to do as part of it. READ THIS FIRST = Your unguided tour of Rhizo14 Why might this course be for you? Teaching for Enduring Understanding Earlier this summer I discussed the idea of backward design, which comes from Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe’s excellent book Understanding by Design. Recall that backward design is a three-stage process, in which you as a teacher first identify your desired results for a class, then determine what would count as evidence that your students did or did not reach those results, and finally, design your learning experience around your desired results and evidence. The idea behind backward design is simple, yet it’s something I find myself relearning again and again.

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