background preloader

FOCA: Informática 64

FOCA: Informática 64

http://www.informatica64.com/foca.aspx

Related:  IT Security

'FOCA' And The Power Of Metadata Analysis Metadata is an interesting -- and often unrealized -- problem for anyone who uses office applications, like Microsoft Office, OpenOffice, and Adobe Acrobat. Metadata is an interesting -- and often unrealized -- problem for anyone who uses office applications, like Microsoft Office, OpenOffice, and Adobe Acrobat.I've written about it before because its impact is often misunderstood both from the publicity and security standpoint. On one hand, metadata provides the necessary data to help organize documents in enterprise document management systems.

theharvester - Information Gathering The objective of this program is to gather emails, subdomains, hosts, employee names, open ports and banners from different public sources like search engines, PGP key servers and SHODAN computer database. This tool is intended to help Penetration testers in the early stages of the penetration test in order to understand the customer footprint on the Internet. It is also useful for anyone that wants to know what an attacker can see about their organization. This is a complete rewrite of the tool with new features like: Time delays between request All sources search Virtual host verifier Active enumeration (DNS enumeration, Reverse lookups, TLD expansion) Integration with SHODAN computer database, to get the open ports and banners Save to XML and HTML Basic graph with stats New sources Passive discovery:

Metadata Extraction using FOCA By Sudhanshu on March 1, 2013 in Analyst - 0 Comments In this Information age, Data is very crucial. From Information security point of view also data is what everybody is behind. Anatomy of a hack: How crackers ransack passwords like “qeadzcwrsfxv1331” In March, readers followed along as Nate Anderson, Ars deputy editor and a self-admitted newbie to password cracking, downloaded a list of more than 16,000 cryptographically hashed passcodes. Within a few hours, he deciphered almost half of them. The moral of the story: if a reporter with zero training in the ancient art of password cracking can achieve such results, imagine what more seasoned attackers can do. Imagine no more. We asked three cracking experts to attack the same list Anderson targeted and recount the results in all their color and technical detail Iron Chef style.

Tracking (and Being Tracked) with Twitter The aptly named Creepy is a "geolocation aggregator," which is to say that it gathers location data from social networking sites and image hosting services. Digital image files contain EXIF tags which record the image's date and time stamp information. Some cameras and smart phones can also provide GPS data along with the time stamp. So ... by using Creepy to collect information from Twitter, Flickr and other apps, you can track a subject's movements and create a composite map. According the Creepy website, "Using Creepy for any illegal or unethical purposes is strictly forbidden and the developer assumes no liability." SIMPLER Project name: theHarvesterDownload: Github CodeLanguage: PythonFeatured in: The objective of this program is to gather emails, subdomains, hosts, employee names, open ports and banners from different public sources like search engines, PGP key servers and SHODAN computer database. This tool is intended to help Penetration testers in the early stages of the penetration test in order to understand the customer footprint on the Internet. It is also useful for anyone that wants to know what an attacker can see about their organization.

How easy is it to hack JavaScript in a browser? This Q&A is part of a weekly series of posts highlighting common questions encountered by technophiles and answered by users at Stack Exchange, a free, community-powered network of 100+ Q&A sites. Jesus Rodriguez asks: My question has to do with JavaScript security. Imagine an auth system where you're using a JavaScript framework like Backbone or AngularJS, and you need secure endpoints. Basic Use Of Maltego For Network Intelligence Gathering Description: This is a screen-cast demonstration of the basic uses of Maltego, a powerful program used in network and open source intelligence gathering, by Rick Gurley of Risk Management Research & Investments, Inc. - a licensed private investigation agency in Columbia, Missouri. With the continued growth of your organization, the people and hardware deployed to ensure that it remains in working order is essential, yet the threat picture of your “environment” is not always clear or complete. In fact, most often it’s not what we know that is harmful - it’s what we don’t know that causes the most damage. This being stated, how do you develop a clear profile of what the current deployment of your infrastructure resembles? What are the cutting edge tool platforms designed to offer the granularity essential to understand the complexity of your network, both physical and resource based? Maltego offers the user with unprecedented information.

Shamir's Secret Sharing Shamir's Secret Sharing is an algorithm in cryptography created by Adi Shamir. It is a form of secret sharing, where a secret is divided into parts, giving each participant its own unique part, where some of the parts or all of them are needed in order to reconstruct the secret. Counting on all participants to combine together the secret might be impractical, and therefore sometimes the threshold scheme is used where any of the parts are sufficient to reconstruct the original secret. Mathematical definition[edit] The goal is to divide secret

Why does the government disallow dynamic languages? This Q&A is part of a weekly series of posts highlighting common questions encountered by technophiles and answered by users at Stack Exchange, a free, community-powered network of 100+ Q&A sites. Patrick asks: I know some people who are currently working on a project for the US military (low security level, non-combat, human resources type data). An initial state of the project code was submitted to the military for review, and they ran the program through some sort of security analyzer tool. It returned a report of known security issues in the code and required changes that needed to be implemented before delivery of the final product. One of the items that needed to be resolved was removal of part of the project that was written in Ruby as it is a dynamic language.

Philips Smart TVs wide open to Gmail cookie theft, other serious hacks Internet-connected TVs manufactured by Philips running the latest firmware update are wide open to browser cookie theft and other serious attacks by hackers within radio range, a security researcher has warned. The hacks work against Philips Smart televisions that have a feature known as Miracast enabled, Luigi Auriemma, a researcher with Malta-based ReVuln (Twitter handle @revuln), told Ars. Miracast allows TVs to act as Wi-Fi access points that nearby computers and smartphones can connect to so their screen output can be displayed on the larger set.

Massive Security Bug In OpenSSL Could Affect A Huge Chunk Of The Internet I saw a t-shirt one time. “I’m a bomb disposal technician,” it read. “If you see me running, try to keep up.” The same sort of idea can be applied to net security: when all the net security people you know are freaking out, it’s probably an okay time to worry. This afternoon, many of the net security people I know are freaking out. A very serious bug in OpenSSL — a cryptographic library that is used to secure a very, very large percentage of the Internet’s traffic — has just been discovered and publicly disclosed.

Drupal sites had “hours” to patch before attacks started Nearly a million websites running the popular Drupal content management system had only hours to update their software before attacks likely compromised the systems, thanks to a widespread vulnerability, the Drupal security team warned this week. On October 15, the security team for the Drupal content management system announced the discovery of a critical security flaw that could allow attackers to steal data or compromise vulnerable sites. Within seven hours of the announcement, attackers had begun broadly scanning for and attacking Drupal sites, according to the project’s security team, which provided the details in an October 29 public service announcement. Phishing scam that penetrated Wall Street just might work against you, too Researchers have uncovered a group of Wall Street-savvy hackers that has penetrated the e-mail accounts of more than 100 companies, a feat that has allowed them to obtain highly valuable plans concerning corporate acquisitions and other insider information. FIN4, as the group is known, relies on a set of extremely simple tactics that in many cases has allowed them to remain undetected since at least the middle of 2013, according to a report published Monday from security firm FireEye. Members boast a strong command of the English language and knowledge of corporate finance and Fortune 500 culture. They use that savvy to send highly targeted spearphishing e-mails that harvest login credentials for Microsoft Outlook accounts. The group then uses compromised accounts of one employee, customer, or partner to send spearphishing e-mails to other company insiders.

Related: