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Nassim Haramein - Sacred Geometry & Unified Fields

Nassim Haramein - Sacred Geometry & Unified Fields

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Y5bXdx5UrE

Étude de graphène révèle structure de l'espace-temps - La Fondation du Projet de résonance Two Physicists at UCLA working with a highly conductive nano-tech material called graphene recently released a new postulate on the origin of the spin of electrons. Professor Chris Regan and graduate student Matthew Mecklenburg discovered that they could accurately predict the spin of electrons if they divided space itself into a lattice of positions interconnected by triangles. (Image: Chris Regan/CNSI) “An electron’s spin might arise because space at very small distances is not smooth, but rather segmented, like a chessboard,” Regan said in an interview for the UCLA Newsroom article.

Is space like a chessboard? Physicists at UCLA set out to design a better transistor and ended up discovering a new way to think about the structure of space. Space is usually considered infinitely divisible — given any two positions, there is always a position halfway between. But in a recent study aimed at developing ultra-fast transistors using graphene, researchers from the UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy and the California NanoSystems Institute show that dividing space into discrete locations, like a chessboard, may explain how point-like electrons, which have no finite radius, manage to carry their intrinsic angular momentum, or "spin." While studying graphene's electronic properties, professor Chris Regan and graduate student Matthew Mecklenburg found that a particle can acquire spin by living in a space with two types of positions — dark tiles and light tiles.

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