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Active / Passive Verb Forms

Active / Passive Verb Forms
Sentences can be active or passive. Therefore, tenses also have "active forms" and "passive forms." You must learn to recognize the difference to successfully speak English. Active Form In active sentences, the thing doing the action is the subject of the sentence and the thing receiving the action is the object. [Thing doing action] + [verb] + [thing receiving action] Examples: Passive Form In passive sentences, the thing receiving the action is the subject of the sentence and the thing doing the action is optionally included near the end of the sentence. [Thing receiving action] + [be] + [past participle of verb] + [by] + [thing doing action] Active / Passive Overview Your personal online English school. Related:  Test Exercises - all classes!

Simple Present vs. Present Progressive Exercises and tests Form See also explanations on Simple Present and Present Progressive Use In general or right now? Do you want to express that something happens in general or that something is happening right now? Timetable / Schedule or arrangement? Do you want to express that something is arranged for the near future? Daily routine or just for a limited period of time? Do you want to talk about a daily routine? Certain Verbs The following verbs are usually only used in Simple Present (not in the progressive form). state: be, cost, fit, mean, suitExample: We are on holiday. possession: belong, haveExample: Sam has a cat. senses: feel, hear, see, smell, taste, touchExample: He feels the cold. feelings: hate, hope, like, love, prefer, regret, want, wishExample: Jane loves pizza. brain work: believe, know, think, understandExample: I believe you. Exercies on Simple Present and Present Progressive Tests on Simple Present and Present Progressive

BusyTeacher.org Mobile This is a pretty simple worksheet for teaching or revising the passive voice at pre-intermediate level. There are two different activities in which students are asked to complete the sentences given with a passive form and rewrite the sentences with a passive verb. The answer key is included. Relative Clauses Content How to form relative clauses Level: lower intermediate Relative pronouns Level: lower intermediate Subject pronouns or Object pronouns? Relative adverbs Level: intermediate Defining relative clauses Level: lower intermediate Non-defining relative clauses Level: upper intermediate How to shorten relative clauses Level: intermediate Exercises and Tests Exercises and tests on relative clauses We use relative clauses to give additional information about something without starting another sentence. How to Form Relative Clauses Level: lower intermediate Imagine, a girl is talking to Tom. A girl is talking to Tom. That sounds rather complicated, doesn't it? Do you know the girl … As your friend cannot know which girl you are talking about, you need to put in the additional information – the girl is talking to Tom. Do you know the girl who is talking to Tom? Relative Pronouns Level: lower intermediate Subject Pronoun or Object Pronoun? the apple which is lying on the table Tests

English Grammar Explanations - Future tenses There are several different ways in English that you can talk about the future. This page is an introduction to the most important ones: - Predictions/statements of fact - Intentions - Arrangements - Scheduled events Predictions/statements of fact The auxiliary verb will is used in making predictions or simple statements of fact about the future. The sun will rise at 6.30 tomorrow. Intentions The auxiliary verb going to is used in talking about intentions. We're going to buy a new car next month. Note: going to is often used in the past tense to talk about an unfulfilled intention. Arrangements The present continuous tense is used in talking about arrangements. I'm meeting my mother at the airport tomorrow.Our grandparents are visiting us this Christmas.Sorry, I can't stay after school today; I'm playing tennis with Jun-Sik.My sister's going to the dentist tomorrow.I'm not returning home for the holidays, so I can come to your party after all! Scheduled events Hurry up! More future tenses.

Participle Clauses 1 Reduced Relative Clauses (Download this page in PDF here.) (Click here for information about participle adjectives.) We can use participle clauses after a noun in the same way as relative clauses. This gives more information about the noun. We sometimes call this a 'reduced relative clause'. 1: A present participle (verb + ing) can be used in the same way as an active relative clause: The man driving the car is a friend of mine.(= The man who is driving the car is a friend of mine). The present participle can replace any active tense, not just the present continuous tense: Lorries coming over the bridge have to be careful of the wind.(= Lorries that come over the bridge have to be careful of the wind).Who was the girl wearing the red dress? 2: A past participle can be used in the same way as a simple passive relative clause: 3: 'Being + past participle' can be used in the same way as a continuous passive relative clause: Things to notice: Not: Who was the girl dropping the coffee?

Angličtina online zdarma Anglická gramatika Časy a stavba věty Use of English: Tenses Kangaroo injures Australian politician May 18, 2013 A kangaroo (1)(injure) Australian politician Shane Rattenbury in the Australian capital, Canberra, on Thursday. 50-common-English-phrasal-verbs.pdf Upper-intermediate use of English - Exercise 3: Kangaroo injures Australian politician Kangaroo injures Australian politician Saturday, May 18, 2013A kangaroo injured Australian politician Shane Rattenbury in the Australian (1), Canberra, on Thursday. Mr. Rattenbury was taking a morning (2) in the Canberra suburb of Ainslie when the kangaroo surprised him, and in the ensuing (3), Mr. By Mr Rattenbury's (5), the kangaroo was an eastern grey kangaroo, which is a common (6) in Australia.

Upper-intermediate use of English - Exercise 3 Woman gives birth on New Jersey PATH train Tuesday, January 17, 2012A New Jersey woman, 31-year-old Rabita Sarker, gave birth on a moving Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH) train yesterday morning. She and her husband Aditya Saurabh were heading (1) St. Sarker boarded the Manhattan-bound PATH train at Journal Square (4) experiencing labor pains. (5) first she believed these were false, (6) soon realized she was (7) fact giving birth.

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