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Nine Herbs Charm

Nine Herbs Charm
The Nine Herbs Charm is an Old English charm recorded in the 10th-century[1] Lacnunga manuscript.[2] The charm is intended for the treatment of poisoning and infection by a preparation of nine herbs. The numbers nine and three, significant in Germanic paganism and later Germanic folklore, are mentioned frequently within the charm.[2] The poem contains references to Christian and English Pagan elements, including a mention of the major Germanic god Woden. According to R. K. Gordon, the poem is "clearly an old heathen thing which has been subjected to Christian censorship. Poem contents[edit] Herbs[edit] The charm references nine herbs: Mucgwyrt (Mugwort)Attorlaðe (identified as Cockspur Grass by R. At the end of the charm, prose instructions are given to take the above-mentioned herbs, crush them to dust, and to mix them with old soap and apple juice. Woden[edit] A snake came crawling, it bit a man. See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit] External links[edit] Related:  hedge witch

Neorxnawang Neorxnawang (also Neorxenawang, Neorxnawong; possibly "field of contentment"[1]) is an Old English term used to translate the Christian concept of "paradise" in Anglo-Saxon literature.[2] The term is often theorized as originally having referred to a mythological "heavenly meadow", or place without toil or worries, in Germanic paganism.[3] Etymology[edit] 19th century scholar Jacob Grimm comments that etymological connections have been proposed between Norn and Neorxnawang, but says that the theory raises etymological and lore problems: "The A. gen. pl. neorxana, which only occurs in 'neorxena wong' = paradisus, has been proposed, but the abbreviation would be something unheard of, and even the nom. sing. neorxe or neorxu at variance with norn; besides,the Parcae are nowhere found connected with paradise."[4] Late 19th and early 20th century philologist James Bright proposes that the variant neorxena- element derives from the phrase ne wyrcan, meaning "no working".[5] See also[edit]

Hearth and Home Witchery Imbolg Crafts and Activities for Children There are so many activities to do with your young ones at Oimelc, many of which can also be done at the Spring Equinox. Older children can help make candles (there are lots of kits out there to make it easier) and candle holders. Younger children can make "candles" from toilet paper rolls and construction paper. If you choose to start your Spring Cleaning, a small brush broom and dustpan, a clean cloth to help wipe down cabinet doors or dust tables or child size cleaning equipment for those little "can I help?" little ones. Make a Priapic Wand ~Reading~ Meagan's Imbolc by Kathryn Dyer The Story of Imbolc by Rachel Walker Making Butter In a clean jar with a screw on top pour in heavy or whipping cream. Paper Brigid's Crown An Imbolc Project By Wendy Sheridan (This is especially appropriate for young girls, since this is the holiday for the return of the maiden). You will need: From: Wendy Sheridan Source:unknown

Anglo-Saxon paganism Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England. A variant of the Germanic paganism found across much of north-western Europe, it encompassed a heterogeneous variety of disparate beliefs and cultic practices.[1] Developing from the earlier Iron Age religion of continental northern Europe, it was introduced to Britain following the Anglo-Saxon migration in the mid fifth century, and remained the dominant religion in England until the Christianization of its kingdoms between the seventh and eighth centuries, with some aspects gradually blending into folklore.[citation needed] The right half of the front panel of the seventh century Franks Casket, depicting the pan-Germanic legend of Weyland Smith also Weyland The Smith, which was apparently also a part of Anglo-Saxon pagan mythology. History[edit] Mythology[edit] Cosmology[edit] Deities[edit]

Earth Witchery Germanic mythology Thor or Donar, god of thunder, one of the major figures in Germanic mythology. Germanic mythology is a comprehensive term for myths associated with historical Germanic paganism, including Norse mythology, Anglo-Saxon mythology, Continental Germanic mythology, and other versions of the mythologies of the Germanic peoples. Germanic mythology ultimately derives from Indo-European mythology, also known as Indo-Germanic mythology. Top ten ancient Irish charms and spells Celebrate all things mysterious and magical on "Occult Day" with these ancient Irish rituals. Photo by: Getty Images/iStockphoto There are many practicing witches and druids in Ireland today who believe in ancient traditions and folk magic. We’ve put together a list of ancient charms and spells based on this Irish magic. Whether you are seeking a spell for love, luck, or healing, emotional charms, or even potency, these charms and spells will have something for you. 1. On the night of a full moon, walk to a spot beneath your beloved's bedroom window. The night breeze is believed to have a guardian who is compassionate toward requests from mortals between midnight and 1 am (the witching hour). 2. Place two keys in a sieve, cross ways. 3. You will be damn lucky with this one. Light the candle and loop the string in through the trinket and tie it. “A candle flickers, this trinket I pass, good energy and fortune come to me, wealth, knowledge, influence, energy. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Continental Germanic mythology Continental Germanic mythology is a subtype of Germanic mythology as practiced in parts of Central Europe during the 6th to 8th centuries, a period of Christianization. It continued in the legends, and Middle High German epics of the Middle Ages. Traces of these stories, with the sacred elements largely removed, may be found throughout European folklore and fairy tales. Tribes[edit] The mythologies of the following tribes are included in this category: Paganism[edit] Compared to North Germanic and, to a lesser extent, Anglo-Saxon mythology, examples of Continental Germanic paganism are extremely fragmentary. Texts[edit] Old High German[edit] Middle High German[edit] See also[edit] Sources[edit]

Burning Incense Is Psychoactive: New Class Of Antidepressants Might Be Right Under Our Noses -- ScienceDaily Religious leaders have contended for millennia that burning incense is good for the soul. Now, biologists have learned that it is good for our brains too. An international team of scientists, including researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, describe how burning frankincense (resin from the Boswellia plant) activates poorly understood ion channels in the brain to alleviate anxiety or depression. "In spite of information stemming from ancient texts, constituents of Bosweilla had not been investigated for psychoactivity," said Raphael Mechoulam, one of the research study's co-authors. To determine incense's psychoactive effects, the researchers administered incensole acetate to mice. According to the National Institutes of Health, major depressive disorder is the leading cause of disability in the United States for people ages 15--44, affecting approximately 14.8 million American adults.

Ragnarök The north portal of the 11th century Urnes stave church has been interpreted as containing depictions of snakes and dragons that represent Ragnarök In Norse mythology, Ragnarök is a series of future events, including a great battle foretold to ultimately result in the death of a number of major figures (including the gods Odin, Thor, Týr, Freyr, Heimdallr, and Loki), the occurrence of various natural disasters, and the subsequent submersion of the world in water. Afterward, the world will resurface anew and fertile, the surviving and returning gods will meet, and the world will be repopulated by two human survivors. Ragnarök is an important event in the Norse canon, and has been the subject of scholarly discourse and theory. The event is attested primarily in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. Mythology[edit] The Old Norse word "ragnarok" is a compound of two words.

Magickal Athenaeum - WikiPagan The Magical Athenaeum is the largest collection of magickal PDF books on the internet, with several hundred files. The resource is maintained by Asiya's Shadows. Books are in the Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) and may be viewed and printed using Adobe Reader. Magical Athenaeum Paganism & Witchcraft The Odin Brotherhood Odinism and Asatru Pagan Classics at Scribd The Eddas. Grimoires & Classics General Hermetics Thelema Chaos Magick Qabalah Christian Mysticism Rosicrucianism Tarot Theosophy

Beowulf Beowulf (/ˈbeɪ.ɵwʊlf/; in Old English [ˈbeːo̯wʊlf] or [ˈbeːəwʊlf]) is the conventional title of an Old English epic poem consisting of 3182 alliterative long lines, set in Scandinavia, commonly cited as one of the most important works of Anglo-Saxon literature due to the fact that it is the oldest surviving epic poem of Old English and also the earliest vernacular English literature.[2] The full poem survives in the manuscript known as the Nowell Codex, located in the British Library. Written in England, its composition by an anonymous Anglo-Saxon poet[a] is dated between the 8th[5] and the early 11th century.[6] In 1731, the manuscript was badly damaged by a fire that swept through Ashburnham House in London that had a collection of medieval manuscripts assembled by Sir Robert Bruce Cotton. Historical background[edit] Approximate central regions of tribes mentioned in Beowulf, with the location of the Angles in Angeln. Summary[edit] While earlier scholars (such as J.R.R. The view of J.

The Hedge Wife: Magical Herbalism Part 1 Witchcraft and herbalism go hand in hand and have done so for centuries. In the past, witches were called wise women or wise men and were often the only people their neighbors could go to for healing. Doctors were sparse and so expensive only gentry could afford them or...there were none to be found in general. Today, many witches are returning to their roots so to speak and looking to find a connection to the earth by healing themselves and those around them with herbs and plants. I wanted to do a series of posts to collect data online into one place for easier research not only for myself but for others looking. The following are site and blogs that provide magical herbal information. Wicca.com has a great reference list form A-Z of herbs and their magical properties. Witch of Forest Grove has a great series of posts called Weeds for Witches that include Dandelion and Clover, two of my favorite weeds. I hope you find many blessings in the links given.

Druid A druid was a member of the educated, professional class among the Celtic peoples of Gaul, Britain, Ireland, and possibly elsewhere during the Iron Age. The druid class included law-speakers, poets and doctors, among other learned professions, although the best known among the druids were the religious leaders. Very little is known about the ancient druids. They left no written accounts of themselves, and the only evidence is a few descriptions left by Greek, Roman, and various scattered authors and artists, as well as stories created by later medieval Irish writers.[2] While archaeological evidence has been uncovered pertaining to the religious practices of the Iron Age people, "not one single artefact or image has been unearthed that can undoubtedly be connected with the ancient Druids. The earliest known reference to the druids dates to 200 BCE, although the oldest actual description comes from the Roman military general Julius Caesar in his Commentarii de Bello Gallico (50s BCE).

The Magical Herbalist’s Mini Guide to Popular Herbs, Plants, Fruits, Flowers & Their Magical Properties… | The Magickal Herbalist The herbs listed below that are marked with a * next to it, should never be consumed without the correct & legal amount made & distributed by that of a qualified herbalist. They are extremely dangerous herbs, especially when used incorrectly… Let us start the list of most popular herbs alphabetically: Absinthium *A healing herb that promotes good health, vigour & an active agent to fight off disease. Acorn *Promotes good luck, encourages fertility, spiritual growth & prosperity. Acacia *Promotes success, monetary gain, lasting love & helps develop your psychic powers. African Violet *A herb that is known for its protection, healing & spiritual growth. Amber *Helps promote happiness, friendship, comfort & reassurance. AgrimonyEncourages protection, helps remove & cleanse away negative energy & hexes. Aletris Root *Commonly used as a magical & herbal correspondence in ‘female magic’, for protection & prosperity. AlmondWisdom & success. Aloe *(The pure form which Aloe Vera is created).

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