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Nine Herbs Charm

Nine Herbs Charm
The Nine Herbs Charm is an Old English charm recorded in the 10th-century[1] Lacnunga manuscript.[2] The charm is intended for the treatment of poisoning and infection by a preparation of nine herbs. The numbers nine and three, significant in Germanic paganism and later Germanic folklore, are mentioned frequently within the charm.[2] The poem contains references to Christian and English Pagan elements, including a mention of the major Germanic god Woden. According to R. K. Gordon, the poem is "clearly an old heathen thing which has been subjected to Christian censorship. Poem contents[edit] Herbs[edit] The charm references nine herbs: Mucgwyrt (Mugwort)Attorlaðe (identified as Cockspur Grass by R. At the end of the charm, prose instructions are given to take the above-mentioned herbs, crush them to dust, and to mix them with old soap and apple juice. Woden[edit] A snake came crawling, it bit a man. See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine_Herbs_Charm

Related:  hedge witchGermanic Mythology (Norse, Germanic, and Continental Germanic)HerbalHerbal Remedies & Health Issues

Hearth and Home Witchery Imbolg Crafts and Activities for Children There are so many activities to do with your young ones at Oimelc, many of which can also be done at the Spring Equinox. Older children can help make candles (there are lots of kits out there to make it easier) and candle holders. Younger children can make "candles" from toilet paper rolls and construction paper. If you choose to start your Spring Cleaning, a small brush broom and dustpan, a clean cloth to help wipe down cabinet doors or dust tables or child size cleaning equipment for those little "can I help?" Neorxnawang Neorxnawang (also Neorxenawang, Neorxnawong; possibly "field of contentment"[1]) is an Old English term used to translate the Christian concept of "paradise" in Anglo-Saxon literature.[2] The term is often theorized as originally having referred to a mythological "heavenly meadow", or place without toil or worries, in Germanic paganism.[3] Etymology[edit] 19th century scholar Jacob Grimm comments that etymological connections have been proposed between Norn and Neorxnawang, but says that the theory raises etymological and lore problems: "The A. gen. pl. neorxana, which only occurs in 'neorxena wong' = paradisus, has been proposed, but the abbreviation would be something unheard of, and even the nom. sing. neorxe or neorxu at variance with norn; besides,the Parcae are nowhere found connected with paradise."[4]

Growing Yarrow Plant: How To Grow Yarrow By Heather Rhoades While often sold as a flowering perennial, yarrow plant (Achillea millefolium) is actually an herb. Whether you decide to grow yarrow in your flower beds or in your herb garden, it is still a lovely addition to make to your yard. Yarrow care is so easy that the plant is virtually care-free. Let’s take a look at how to plant yarrow and also tips for how to grow yarrow. 'Miracle Grass' Encourages Longevity While Dispelling Disease By Carolanne Wright Contributing Writer for Wake Up World More potent than ginseng, jiaogulan is a powerful antidote to aging, cancer, cardiovascular disease, stress and fatigue. It even helps to maintain proper weight. Known as an immortality elixir, this herb has been used for centuries throughout Asia. Jiaogulan is a top notch tonic for modern life too — a true herbal champion for healthy and dynamic living.

Top ten ancient Irish charms and spells Celebrate all things mysterious and magical on "Occult Day" with these ancient Irish rituals. Photo by: Getty Images/iStockphoto There are many practicing witches and druids in Ireland today who believe in ancient traditions and folk magic. Anglo-Saxon paganism Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England. A variant of the Germanic paganism found across much of north-western Europe, it encompassed a heterogeneous variety of disparate beliefs and cultic practices.[1] Developing from the earlier Iron Age religion of continental northern Europe, it was introduced to Britain following the Anglo-Saxon migration in the mid fifth century, and remained the dominant religion in England until the Christianization of its kingdoms between the seventh and eighth centuries, with some aspects gradually blending into folklore.[citation needed] The right half of the front panel of the seventh century Franks Casket, depicting the pan-Germanic legend of Weyland Smith also Weyland The Smith, which was apparently also a part of Anglo-Saxon pagan mythology.

14 natural items for your alternative first aid kit Cloves. Photo by Elenadan Find out which multitasking natural remedies merit a spot in your backpack. IF YOU’VE COME TO trust in herbal and alternative medicine at home, it can be a hard decision to go back to Pepto-Bismol and Dayquil when you’re getting ready to go abroad. The Traveller’s Medicine Cabinet: 5 Essential Drugs for the Road While out roving you aren’t always (or even often) anywhere near a hospital or pharmacy. But, if you pack these nutritional supplements and natural medications wherever you go, you’ll be able to cope just fine. #1: Kratom The Situation

Burning Incense Is Psychoactive: New Class Of Antidepressants Might Be Right Under Our Noses Religious leaders have contended for millennia that burning incense is good for the soul. Now, biologists have learned that it is good for our brains too. An international team of scientists, including researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, describe how burning frankincense (resin from the Boswellia plant) activates poorly understood ion channels in the brain to alleviate anxiety or depression. This suggests that an entirely new class of depression and anxiety drugs might be right under our noses. "In spite of information stemming from ancient texts, constituents of Bosweilla had not been investigated for psychoactivity," said Raphael Mechoulam, one of the research study's co-authors. "We found that incensole acetate, a Boswellia resin constituent, when tested in mice lowers anxiety and causes antidepressive-like behavior.

Germanic mythology Thor or Donar, god of thunder, one of the major figures in Germanic mythology. Germanic mythology is a comprehensive term for myths associated with historical Germanic paganism, including Norse mythology, Anglo-Saxon mythology, Continental Germanic mythology, and other versions of the mythologies of the Germanic peoples. Germanic mythology ultimately derives from Indo-European mythology, also known as Indo-Germanic mythology. The 48 Most Essential Healing Herbs Waking Times People are once again turning towards natural medicines, foods and plants for their healing properties, realizing that modern medicine may not always be the best answer to the body’s ailments. The brief descriptions below will provide you with the basic information about some well-known herbs and botanicals. Click on any of the links to explore a large variety of herbal products now available on Amazon.

Treat Asthma Naturally With Khella Ammi visnaga (Bishop's weed), published under the GNU Free Documentation License. This is an update of an article from the original Gaia Health: Asthma is a heartbreaking condition that has become frighteningly common among children. Standard medical treatment uses steroids, exceptionally harsh drugs that tend to have diminishing returns over time, often leaving the sufferer in worse condition, and carrying enormous health risks, including diabetes, osteoporosis, high blood pressure, and mental illness. Before taking such a gamble with your child’s health, perhaps it would be wise to try the little-known herb called khella.

Magickal Athenaeum - WikiPagan The Magical Athenaeum is the largest collection of magickal PDF books on the internet, with several hundred files. The resource is maintained by Asiya's Shadows. Books are in the Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) and may be viewed and printed using Adobe Reader. Magical Athenaeum Paganism & Witchcraft Continental Germanic mythology Continental Germanic mythology is a subtype of Germanic mythology as practiced in parts of Central Europe during the 6th to 8th centuries, a period of Christianization. It continued in the legends, and Middle High German epics of the Middle Ages. Traces of these stories, with the sacred elements largely removed, may be found throughout European folklore and fairy tales. Tribes[edit]

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