background preloader

Neck (water spirit)

Neck (water spirit)
The Nyx/Nixie (German: Nix/Nixie/Nyx, Norwegian: Nøkk or plural: Nøkken) are shapeshifting water spirits who usually appear in human form. These spirits have appeared in the myths and legends of all Germanic peoples in Europe.,[1] Although perhaps most known in Norwegian and Scandinavian folklore. In recent times such creatures have usually been depicted as human in shape (albeit in many cases shapeshifting). However, the English Knucker is generally depicted as a wyrm or dragon, thus attesting to the survival of the other usage as any "water-being" rather than an exclusively humanoid creature. Their sex, bynames, and various animal-like transformations vary geographically. The names are held to derive from Common Germanic *nikwus or *nikwis(i), derived from PIE *neigw ("to wash").[2] It is related to Sanskrit nḗnēkti, Greek νίζω nízō and νίπτω níptō, and Irish nigh' (all meaning to wash or be washed).[3] The nøkken was also an omen for drowning accidents. Related:  European Water Deities

Vodyanoy Vodyanoy is said to appear as a naked old man with a frog-like face, greenish beard, and long hair, with his body covered in algae and muck, usually covered in black fish scales. He has webbed paws instead of hands, a fish's tail, eyes that burn like red-hot coals. He usually rides along his river on a half-sunk log, making loud splashes. Consequently, he is often dubbed "grandfather" or "forefather" by the local people. Local drownings are said to be the work of the vodyanoy (or rusalkas). When angered, the vodyanoy breaks dams, washes down water mills, and drowns people and animals. Vodník[edit] Typical projection of vodník in Czech or Slovak folklore. Czech,Slovenian and Slovak tales have both evil and good vodníci (relative to human beings) who do (or don't, respectively) try to drown people when they happen to swim in their territory. Cultural references[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] Rose, Carol (2001).

Finfolk Finfolkaheem[edit] According to folklore, the under water dwelling of the Finfolk, known as Finfolkaheem (literally "Finfolk's Home")[1] is regarded as the place of origin for the Finfolk, and their ancestral home. A fantastic under water palace with massive crystal halls, Finfolkaheem is surrounded, inside and out, by ornate gardens of multi-coloured seaweed. It's never dark in Finfolkaheem, because it is lit by the phosphorescent glow of tiny sea creatures at night. Its great halls and vast rooms are decorated with moving underwater draped curtains whose colours move and dance with the underwater currents. Human Abduction[edit] Unlike the "Selkie" made famous by the "The Great Silkie of Sule Skerry", the Finfolk are neither romantic nor friendly. Married Life[edit] The Finwife[edit] The Finman[edit] The Finman is described as being tall, dark and thin with a stern, gloomy face. Hildaland and Eynhallow[edit] References[edit] References in Orkney Folklore[edit] Modern Renditions[edit]

Fylgja In Norse mythology, a fylgja (Old Norse, literally "someone that accompanies,"[1] plural fylgjur) is a spirit who accompanies a person in connection to their fate or fortune. Fylgjur usually appear in the form of an animal or a human and commonly appear during sleep, but the sagas relate that they could appear while a person is awake as well, and that seeing one's fylgja is an omen of one's impending death. However, when fylgjur appear in the form of women, they are then supposedly guardian spirits for people or clans (ættir). Both Andy Orchard and Rudolf Simek note parallels between the concept of the hamingja—a personification of a family's or individual's fortune—and the fylgja.[2] See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit]

Nerthus Nerthus (1905) by Emil Doepler. In Germania, Tacitus records that the remote Suebi tribes were united by their veneration of the goddess at his time of writing and maintained a sacred grove on an (unspecified) island and that a holy cart rests there draped with cloth, which only a priest may touch. The priests feel her presence by the cart, and, with deep reverence, attend her cart, which is drawn by heifers. Everywhere the goddess then deigns to visit, she is met with celebration, hospitality, and peace. All iron objects are locked away, and no one will leave for war. When the goddess has had her fill she is returned to her temple by the priests. The name Nerthus is generally held to be a Latinized form of Proto-Germanic *Nerþuz, which is the Proto-Germanic precursor to the Old Norse deity name Njörðr, who is a male deity in works recorded in the 13th century. Etymology[edit] Germania[edit] Theories and interpretations[edit] Nerthus typically is identified as a Vanir goddess. Notes[edit]

Selkie Selkies (also known as silkies or selchies) are mythological creatures found in Scottish, Irish, and Faroese folklore.[1] Similar creatures are described in the Icelandic traditions.[2] The word derives from earlier Scots selich, (from Old English seolh meaning seal).[3] Selkies are said to live as seals in the sea but shed their skin to become human on land. The legend is apparently most common in Orkney and Shetland[4] and is very similar to those of swan maidens.[5] Legends[edit] Male selkies are described as being very handsome in their human form, and having great seductive powers over human women. Stories concerning selkies are generally romantic tragedies. In the Faroe Islands there are two versions of the story of the Selkie or Seal Wife. A seal-woman steps out from her seal coat on the beach Selkies are not always faithless lovers. Some stories from Shetland have selkies luring islanders into the sea at midsummer, the lovelorn humans never returning to dry land.[7] See also[edit]

here to help? bitch, i might be. Rusalka In Slavic mythology, a rusalka (plural: rusalki or rusalky) is a female ghost, water nymph, succubus, or mermaid-like demon that dwelt in a waterway. Other terms for these spirits include vila (plural: vily), wiła, willy (plural: willies), samovila, samodiva, rusavka, and mavka. According to most traditions, the rusalki were fish-women, who lived at the bottom of rivers. In the middle of the night, they would walk out to the bank and dance in meadows. Origin[edit] In most versions, the rusalka is an unquiet dead being, associated with the "unclean force". The ghostly version is the soul of a young woman who had died in or near a river or a lake and came back to haunt that waterway. Rusalki can also come from unbaptized children, often those who were born out of wedlock and drowned by their mothers for that reason. Rusalki in folklore can also be beneficial. Description[edit] Rusalki were believed to often exist in groups: Rusalki like to have men and children join in their games.

Kelpie The kelpie is a supernatural water horse from Celtic folklore that is believed to haunt the rivers and lochs of Scotland and Ireland; the name may be from Scottish Gaelic cailpeach or colpach "heifer, colt".[1] Folklore[edit] In mythology, the kelpie is described as a strong and powerful horse. It is a white and sky blue colour and appeared as a lost pony, but could be identified by its constantly dripping mane. Its mane and tail are a bit curly. Its skin was said to be like that of a seal, smooth but as cold as death when touched. The fable of the kelpie varies by region. Similar creatures[edit] There are many mythological creatures similar to the kelpie, such as the "nuggle" from Orkney, and a "shoopiltee," or "njogel," or "tangi" from Shetland. In popular culture[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] Sources[edit]

Milkovich Helps

Related: