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Keep Wall Street Occupied (Part 1)

Keep Wall Street Occupied (Part 1)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JlxbKtBkGM

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Cell Phone Guide for Occupy Wall Street Protesters (and Everyone Else) Occupy Wall Street has called for a global day of action on October 15, and protesters are mobilizing all over the world. In the United States, the Occupy Wall Street movement has already spawned sizeable protests in New York, Washington DC, Boston, Seattle, San Francisco, Oakland, Austin, and other cities. Several of these movements have faced opposition from their local police departments, including mass arrests. Protesters of all political persuasions are increasingly documenting their protests -- and encounters with the police -- using electronic devices like cameras and cell phones.

Occupy what else? Six new culprits for economic inequality in America. But the movement needs some new destinations. It’s getting cold in Zuccotti Park, and the authorities in other Occupy cities are starting to run out of patience. Besides, if you’re really serious about addressing income inequality and economic injustice in America, there are other institutions and figures worth challenging. The Failure of the Occupy Movement or the Emergence of a Living Systems Organization I got done chatting with a colleague this morning, who went on a bit of a rant about the failures of the Occupy movement. Their comments were similar to ones I’ve seen in the media – lack of apparent leadership, lack of specific demands. Of course, I’ve also seen several cogent arguments that this is something ‘different,’ and the people are well aware what they’re angry about, and are figuring out how to level the playing field.

CHARTS: Here's What The Wall Street Protesters Are So Angry About... The "Occupy Wall Street" protests are gaining momentum, having spread from a small park in New York to marches to other cities across the country. So far, the protests seem fueled by a collective sense that things in our economy are not fair or right. But the protesters have not done a good job of focusing their complaints—and thus have been skewered as malcontents who don't know what they stand for or want. (An early list of "grievances" included some legitimate beefs, but was otherwise just a vague attack on "corporations." Given that these are the same corporations that employ more than 100 million Americans and make the products we all use every day, this broadside did not resonate with most Americans).

In The Era Of Big Boxes, A Day For The Little Guy CHAGRIN FALLS, Ohio -- It began quietly, as an email to 40 friends. But when a steady stream of customers began coming through the door before the family-owned Chagrin Hardware had even opened for the day on Saturday, it was clear that it had turned into much more than that. The idea started with Jim Black, a resident of Chagrin Falls, a close-knit village in Cleveland's eastern suburbs that is part artist colony and part bedroom community. Black posted the email to a group of his friends. "Let's show our support for one of our local businesses," he wrote. "I challenge everyone to spend AT LEAST $20 at the hardware on the 21st."

For the Fracture of Good Order “Our apologies, good friends, for the fracture of good order, the burning of paper instead of children….” These were Father Daniel Berrigan’s words when he was on trial in 1969 for a draft board raid in Catonsville, Maryland. He and eight others had entered the draft board office during business hours, removed draft files (against some resistance from the staff) and then burned them out front with homemade napalm.

We Are the 53%. Or not. Oh man this “We Are the 53%” movement. It is actually very sad! Basically, conservative pundit Erick Erickson has started a campaign called “We Are the 53%,” to counter the “We Are the 99%” and Occupy Wall Street movements. According to Erickson’s (very simplistic) math, 53% of Americans pay more in federal income taxes than they receive back in deductions or credits, and so 53% of people are subsidizing everyone else.

The Propaganda Posters of the 1% Banks and governments own all the money and power thus controlling society and they will do absolutely anything to keep it that way, To top it off we are now paying off there huge debt again, as planned -not a mistake. To be honest I have very little hope for society especially when people are trying to do something about this whether it the right way or not but still trying, only to be met with total denial from all sides. As history has has told us, people only do something when its all or nearly too late and we are close to that point and even have an opportunity that will soon be gone. I consider the polar bear already extinct and in some ways I don’t think people even deserve the polar bear. Anyone that claims to feel bad about it when the bear is truly gone can stick it, because we had our chance but we have already decided financial gain for people who already have most the money is the best option.

The Great American Bubble Machine The first thing you need to know about Goldman Sachs is that it's everywhere. The world's most powerful investment bank is a great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money. In fact, the history of the recent financial crisis, which doubles as a history of the rapid decline and fall of the suddenly swindled dry American empire, reads like a Who's Who of Goldman Sachs graduates.

Occupy Sandy: Why Activists Are Working with NYC Mayor, Police Two hundred people were lined up at a hurricane relief center in a park in Brooklyn’s Red Hook neighborhood on Sunday morning when three volunteers hoisted the banners of two enemy camps that had come together in an uneasy collaboration: the Occupy movement and the office of New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. One of those helping hang the banners on white tents with duct tape was Red Hook resident Kirby Desmarais, 26, a band manager and volunteer with the local branch of Occupy Sandy, an effort launched the day after Hurricane Sandy devastated parts of the East Coast in late October. “I’m getting a little verklempt. This is a really big thing,” Desmarais said, looking at the two signs, using the Yiddish word for choked with emotion. One banner read, “Occupy Sandy Mutual Aid Not Charity.”

The Human Chain as a Non-Violent Weapon One of the main weapons of non-violent uprisings are human chains. The latter's power is, as with all chains, its continuous physical form: a line of protesters interlocking arms and blocking the mobility of state agents. This is the breathing, striving material form of a collective body unified in its aim to wrest space from the control of the state. Paul Virilio wrote that “a place changes in quality according to the facility with which it can be crossed” (Bunker Archaeology, p.19). Human chains qualitatively transform and politicize space because they make it hard for state agents to move, cross that space, and control it.

Open Letter to that 53% Guy In the picture, you’re holding up a sheet of paper that says: I am a former Marine. I work two jobs. Occupy Wall Street – A Collection Photo by jamie nyc. Photo by david_shankbone. By Banksy. Photo by duncan. How Paulson Gave Hedge Funds Advance Word Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson stepped off the elevator into the Third Avenue offices of hedge fund Eton Park Capital Management LP in Manhattan. It was July 21, 2008, and market fears were mounting. Four months earlier, Bear Stearns Cos. had sold itself for just $10 a share to JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM) Now, amid tumbling home prices and near-record foreclosures, attention was focused on a new source of contagion: Fannie Mae (FNMA) and Freddie Mac, which together had more than $5 trillion in mortgage-backed securities and other debt outstanding, Bloomberg Markets reports in its January issue.

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