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Fake Or Real? How To Self-Check The News And Get The Facts

Fake Or Real? How To Self-Check The News And Get The Facts

https://choice.npr.org/index.html?origin=https://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/12/05/503581220/fake-or-real-how-to-self-check-the-news-and-get-the-facts

Related:  COLLECTION: Media Literacy and Fake NewsFAKE NEWSandrewvinsonThe mediaMedia literacy

UM Library Fake News Course The slides for the LOEX 2018 session entitled Fake News, Lies, and a For-credit Class: Lessons Learned from Teaching a 7-Week Fake News Undergraduate Library Course can be seen on the right. An open Canvas version of the course is available as well. Look for a Canvas version of the course in the Commons if you are a Canvas campus. The assignments in the Canvas Commons course take advantage of the integration of Google Drive and Canvas on our campus. See the assignment materials below if the Canvas assignments are unavailable to you. A machine-readable version of the syllabus is available. I Found It On the Internet, It Must Be True: Fact vs. Opinion for Middle School Students Actual text message exchange between one of the authors of this blog and her child: While this particular fun fact turned out to be entirely true, what caused a double take was the last little bit of this text exchange: “fun facts that I found on the internet.” What makes this conversation even more relevant (and extraordinarily more horrifying) was that we had just finished presenting a session on fake news and information literacy at a conference and here was one of our own flesh and blood finding “facts” on the internet. Fact vs. fiction

Google Slides vous permet de créer et de modifier des présentations en ligne gratuitement One account. All of Google. Sign in to continue to Slides Find my account Forgot password? Sign in with a different account Create account Manufacturing Consent Non-fiction book by Edward S. Herman and Noam Chomsky A 2002 revision takes account of developments such as the fall of the Soviet Union. Barack Obama on fake news: 'We have problems' if we can't tell the difference President Barack Obama has spoken out about fake news on Facebook and other media platforms, suggesting that it helped undermine the US political process. “If we are not serious about facts and what’s true and what’s not, if we can’t discriminate between serious arguments and propaganda, then we have problems,” he said during a press conference in Germany. Since the surprise election of Donald Trump as president-elect, Facebook has battled accusations that it has failed to stem the flow of misinformation on its network and that its business model leads to users becoming divided into polarized political echo chambers. Obama said that we live in an age with “so much active misinformation” that is “packaged very well” and looks the same whether it’s on Facebook or on TV. “If everything seems to be the same and no distinctions are made, then we won’t know what to protect.

Determining the real from the fake health news - Philly The American Dialect Society voted “fake news” its Word of the Year for 2017, saluting the phrase for its double meanings as “disinformation or falsehoods presented as real news” and “actual news that is claimed to be untrue.” Fake news of either kind is a problem in politics, to be sure. But misleading or erroneous medical news is potentially even worse. It is scary, can lead to poor decisions, and may even hurt the credibility of all health-care providers by making it look as if medicine is not trustworthy. Fake health news can be divided into at least three categories. Junk news that wastes your time, but doesn’t necessarily harm your health.

The Hidden Audience of the Factitious News Game – Bob Hone Clever Workaround For Sara Hood, reference librarian at the Santa Fe Community College library, the original Factitious game wasn’t configured to support the information literacy workshops she presents at the college. That game version would pull 15 articles at random from a set of 45 possible articles to allow players to play the game multiple times. Google Forms vous permet de créer des questionnaires et d'en analyser les résultats gratuitement One account. All of Google. Sign in to continue to Forms Find my account Forgot password? How Journalists Minimize Bias Gilbert Bailon, Editor, St. Louis Post-Dispatch Sometimes when people say, “Are you guys completely neutral?” No, we’re not robots. Journalists are human beings and every human being has, whether it’s bias or prejudge or however we were brought up, we have influences in our lives. We see things differently.

The End of Reality In a dank corner of the internet, it is possible to find actresses from Game of Thrones or Harry Potter engaged in all manner of sex acts. Or at least to the world the carnal figures look like those actresses, and the faces in the videos are indeed their own. Everything south of the neck, however, belongs to different women. An artificial intelligence has almost seamlessly stitched the familiar visages into pornographic scenes, one face swapped for another. The genre is one of the cruelest, most invasive forms of identity theft invented in the internet era. At the core of the cruelty is the acuity of the technology: A casual observer can’t easily detect the hoax.

The Truth Is Out There: Fact-Checking Resources for Students Do you ever feel like you have slipped into an episode of "The Twilight Zone" or "The X-Files" when you see some of the “facts” your students share? Do you wonder where they found these “facts,” or how to convince students that they might not be using the most reliable of resources? Frightened by what your students consider to be "facts"? Show them how to find the truth with fact-checking websites and reliable news resources. Think back to the fall 2017: How many times did you open your Facebook or Twitter feed and see that friends and acquaintances had posted articles with headlines like “Flight Crew Takes a Knee, Leaving New Orleans Saints Stranded” or “Plastic Surgeon Develops High Heel Foot Surgery,” purporting that one could have their feet surgically altered to look like high heels? How many of you rolled your eyes and scrolled patiently past the post?

2. Americans are divided by party in the sources they turn to for political news To a large degree, the pattern of partisan polarization that emerges in attitudes about the credibility of news sources is also evident in the sources that Republicans and Democrats rely on for news about politics and the election. Overall, Republicans (and independents who lean Republican) get political and election news from a smaller group of sources than Democrats, with an overwhelming reliance on one source – Fox News. Democrats (including independents who lean Democratic), on the other hand, use a wider range of sources. Six-in-ten Republicans say they got news from the Fox News cable network in the past week. After Fox News, there is a huge gap before the next most turned-to sources – ABC News, NBC News and CBS News, all at similar levels (30%, 28%, and 26% respectively). Despite Republicans’ deep distrust of CNN, it is among the more commonly used sources among Republicans, with 24% who got political news there in the past week.

News Literacy Introduction: News Through Time Today we are at the Newseum in Washington D.C. – where the history of free expression is explained and defended. The first printing presses arrived in the United States in the mid-1600s, marking an important step in the history of America’s free press. A free press is important in democratic society.

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