background preloader

NAME GENERATORS for your dog or pet from Chinaroad Lowchens of Australia -

NAME GENERATORS for your dog or pet from Chinaroad Lowchens of Australia -
HILLBILLY NAME GENERATOR Well, mine was Billie Jane Winchester CHARACTER NAME GENERATOR Produce names for all sorts of characters EVANGELIST NAME GENERATOR The first thing to realize is that an evangelist is a performer, and as such his name is his calling card. DARTH MAKER NAME GENERATOR When you absolutely need a villain for the Star Wars universe. ROCKET NAME GENERATOR Yes that's right, you too can get your own official Rocketname MECHA NAMER Generates "Super Robot" style names for robots, including their models. TREE-BEING NAMER Call them Ents, Treants, Treemen, what you will, this generator gives you something specific to call individuals. WORD & NAME GENERATORS The generated names are fairly good, and very useable for role-playing fantasy games and such DRAGON NAME GENERATOR Can't think of a dragon name? ELF NAME GENERATOR This random name generator will output random names of a specified style DEMON NAME GENERATOR Angel or Demon names. MIDDLE-EARTH NAME GENERATORSimply wonderful! U.S.

The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test Stuck with a case of massive writer's block? Has your muse gone on indefinite hiatus? Or are you just bored? Check out the random generators - with a click of a button, you can create characters, names, settings, items, and more for your creative works! The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test How to use this test: First, if you're unsure of what a Mary Sue is, please read this page. Answer all questions for which the answer is 'yes' or 'technically yes' unless the item mentioned is so commonplace in the universe you are writing for that it doesn't really make your character remarkable or unusual. If your character is a role-playing character and the only reason you can answer 'yes' is because of other players acting of their own free wills (IE, everyone has their characters throwing themselves at your character's feet and you've done nothing to force this) do not answer yes to the corresponding question. Part 1 - All Characters Questions that pertain to all characters everywhere.

25 Ways To Plot, Plan and Prep Your Story I’m a panster at heart, plotter by necessity — and I always advocate learning how to plot and plan because inevitably someone on the business side of things is going to poke you with a pointy stick and say, “I want this.” Thus you will demonstrate your talent. Even so, in choosing to plot on your own, you aren’t limited to a single path. The Basic Vanilla Tried-And-True Outline The basic and essential outline. The Reverse Outline Start at the end, instead. Tentpole Moments A story in your head may require certain keystone events to be part of the plot. Beginning, Middle, End Write three paragraphs, each detailing the rough three acts found in every story: the inciting incident and outcome of the beginning (Act I), the escalation and conflict in the middle (Act II), the climactic culmination of events and the ease-down denoument of the end (Act III). A Series Of Sequences Chapter-By-Chapter For novel writers, you can chart your story by its chapters. Beat Sheet Mind-Maps Zero Draft Dialogue Pass

10 Days of Character Building: Wrap Up Character Bio Sheets A bio sheet is a way of keeping track of a character’s physical description, traits and attributes. This method is familiar to anyone who enjoys role playing games such as Dungeons and Dragons. Using a Bio Sheet gives you an excellent reference point to go back to when you need to remember key information about your character. Defining Characters By Their Roles There are specific roles that characters fall into when you are writing a story. Building a Character Using Multiple Perspectives This technique helps you to build relationships. Key Questions This is a simple list of questions that provide insight into your character and how your character fits into your story. Basing Characters on Real People We often draw inspiration for fictional characters from people we know in real life. A Day in the Life Once the events of a story kick into motion, main characters are pushed outside of their boundaries and comfort zones. Interview Biography Possessions Brainstorming

Seven Common Character Types Seven Common Character Types by Terry W. Ervin II Fiction writers employ a variety of characters while weaving their tales. Beyond the standard definitions of protagonist (the main character in a literary work) and antagonist (the main character or force that opposes the protagonist in a literary work), recognizing the types of characters and the parts they play while reading an interesting story can add to the experience. In addition, a fuller understanding of the character types and their uses can increase a writer’s effectiveness in weaving his own fictional tales. Below is a list of common character types, followed by an explanation and short example. Confidante- someone in whom the central character confides, thus revealing the main character’s personality, thoughts, and intentions. Example: In a story, Melvin Sanders is a detective on the trail of a serial killer. In this example Chops is a confidante. In this example Ebenezer Scrooge is a dynamic character. Copyright © Terry W.

Random Generators! - LOTS Run out of ideas for your latest novel or roleplaying game? Has your writing or artistic muse abandoned you? Does your creativity just need a kick in the pants? You've come to the right place - with the click of a button, new ideas are yours for the taking. Tip: If you want to use a random generator on a computer with no Internet access, save the file to a portable drive. Randomly-Chosen Random Generator Let random chance take you to your destination! Fandom-Relevant Generator Index Browse a list of popular fandoms to find generators relevant to your interests, be they Doctor Who, The Avengers, Sherlock, Dungeons & Dragons, or many, many more. Worldbuilding-Relevant Generator Index Browse a list of random generators useful for building worlds and cultures. Name GeneratorsNames for characters, places, and more. Human & Humanoid Character Generators Profiles and descriptions for humans and things mostly resembling humans. Location & Setting Generators Places for your story to happen in.

Here to Create & 102 Resources for Fiction Writing UPDATE 1/10: Dead links removed, new links added, as well as Revision and Tools and Software sections. Are you still stuck for ideas for National Novel Writing Month? Or are you working on a novel at a more leisurely pace? Here are 102 resources on Character, Point of View, Dialogue, Plot, Conflict, Structure, Outlining, Setting, and World Building, plus some links to generate Ideas and Inspiration. Also, I recommend some resources for Revision and some online Tools and Software. Too many links? 10 Days of Character Building Name Generators Name Playground The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test Priming the idea pump (A character checklist shamlessly lifted from acting) How to Create a Character Seven Common Character Types Handling a Cast of Thousands – Part I: Getting to Know Your Characters It’s Not What They Say . . . Establishing the Right Point of View: How to Avoid “Stepping Out of Character” How to Start Writing in the Third Person Web Resources for Developing Characters Speaking of Dialogue

Handling a Cast of Thousands - Part I: Getting to Know Your Characters by Will Greenway Few writing challenges are greater than doing justice to a large cast of characters in a novel or story. In fact, the difference between simply doing them justice and handling them well is a significant level of effort in itself. Sadly, this is one of those writer conundrums that is often best resolved with a "Don't do that if it hurts" solution. Getting a grip on your cast Cast members are reoccurring characters who are pivotal to your story. Aside from your main cast, there will be supporting roles, and often dozens of walk-on or cameo characters. Least significant, but always necessary, are walk-ons and cameos. Because of the limited time these characters spend in the frame, writers tend to make them more exotic, giving them odd quirks or ticks in order to make them interesting. Beware of "extras" with aspirations of star status. Don't promote these exotic latecomers to cast status. Casting couch -- criteria for success A viewpoint character carries a heavy onus.

Chaotic Shiny - mannny generators It's Not What They Say... by Mary Cook In fiction writing it's the dialogue that lifts your characters off the page. You must ensure your writing is strong enough for the task. It's not what they say; it's the way they say it Speech has a natural rhythm, like music. You can tell a lot about a character by his verbal mannerisms. One person might use "you know" a great deal, while another opens nearly every sentence with "Well". Punctuation is almost as important as the words. Punctuation is also important from a style point of view. Don't use the exclamation point too freely. You can learn a lot about realistic dialogue by eavesdropping on other people's conversations. Don't be tempted to write with a regional accent by introducing strange spellings. Anyone who has read Somerset Maugham's Liza of Lambeth will know what I mean. For example, the following dialogue on the subject of childbirth could lead the reader to think Maugham couldn't spell or was writing in a foreign language: Cut out the superfluous words.

Fantasy Place Name Generator for RPG players and authors Naming Your Geographical Features This name generator generates names for geographical features, town names and village names. Names vary from the amost normal to the downright bizarre. Should you not find the place name you want then you can try again and get a different set. Please select how many names you want to generate,and if you want any dark wierdness, and press submit. Recent NamesGenerated NeathurstNorth SickslipThe Hills Of NantpoolNewwayWesingtonDillwoodDoshlake HillBelasenford LodgeMoistknot LakeViledumpSowlockKinburghSnitchcatt MarshBiteylisThe Town Of GrokhaltAxechesterWorldsworth LakeDilloverSunridgeRedaman MountTrewichTaneterWinteraton TorStrathmereMancoteRedcesterMorsbyQuencasterShineontonBlingtre TempleWesenham CastleStenchaxeMount InverfirthHuntingfieldEstdonSeaingtonLovetonBemvaleWealdlockThe County Of SuthamWinterbranEvilgameShaftegill LodgeDeverhuggleSagestoneMaclock LakeDropmesBourneterHawkmereWealdsbyColdachWinterronWest ReddeanCulhamptonWrongkis MountLickdame

Establishing the Right Point of View Establishing the Right Point of View: How to Avoid "Stepping Out of Character" by Marg Gilks Return to Characters, Viewpoint, and Names · Print/Mobile-Friendly Version "Dalquist was shaking with rage, tears streaking down her face. 'Get out,' she whispered. Yikes! If you can see what's wrong with this excerpt, congratulations. What's wrong with the above excerpt? Paragraph one is ambiguous. Every scene should have only one POV character, and everything must be filtered through that POV character's perceptions. But, isn't it so much easier just to tell the reader what character X is thinking, rather than trying to show it in ways the POV character (and thus, the reader) can see and understand? Let's look at that again, and we'll see a hint: isn't it so much easier just to tell the reader what character X is thinking, rather than trying to show it in ways the POV character can see and understand? Yup: "show, don't tell." Yup: characterization. "Lexas didn't turn around. Find Out More...

Fantasy Name Generator By Samuel Stoddard - Version 1.5 One of the perks of creating fantasy stories -- whether by writing a story or game or by role-playing -- is you get to make up the names. Some people relish the task while others are frustrated by it. Some like it but can't seem to create names that are diverse enough. In addition, this tool can be fairly amusing to use even if you don't have any name creating to do. You can use the fantasy name generator below. Web Resources for Developing Characters When developing characters, many writers use personality traits that they see in themselves and in others, such as friends, family and celebrities. A new source of material and information that can help you develop characters is the Internet. The Internet offers some unique resources for character development, such as psychological testing websites, baby name databases and other reference sites and databases. These websites certainly weren't created for writers developing characters; nevertheless, these site are extremely useful for writers. This article will help you locate some of these useful resources, and give you some tips about how you can use them to develop your own characters. Psychological Resources Psychological websites can help writers learn the underlying principles of behavior that motivate or cause people to act as they do. Biography Resources Biography resources can be a great help to writers. Naming Characters Other Resources Developing Characters

Related: