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NAME GENERATORS for your dog or pet from Chinaroad Lowchens of Australia -

NAME GENERATORS for your dog or pet from Chinaroad Lowchens of Australia -
Related:  Character Development

The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test Stuck with a case of massive writer's block? Has your muse gone on indefinite hiatus? Or are you just bored? Check out the random generators - with a click of a button, you can create characters, names, settings, items, and more for your creative works! The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test How to use this test: First, if you're unsure of what a Mary Sue is, please read this page. Answer all questions for which the answer is 'yes' or 'technically yes' unless the item mentioned is so commonplace in the universe you are writing for that it doesn't really make your character remarkable or unusual. If your character is a role-playing character and the only reason you can answer 'yes' is because of other players acting of their own free wills (IE, everyone has their characters throwing themselves at your character's feet and you've done nothing to force this) do not answer yes to the corresponding question. Part 1 - All Characters Questions that pertain to all characters everywhere.

Writing purple women — Writing, Thinking, and Opinions Can men be purple too? Of course not. Men are green. In all seriousness, though, there shouldn’t be too much difference between writing male characters and writing female characters. Unfortunately, for reasons far too myriad to list, writers typically do approach the writing of women differently than they do the writing of men. I don’t think male characters are necessarily easier to write well, but the archetypes are certainly more forgiving, coming as they do from generation upon generation of male-driven stories in which the women really are just plot devices or window dressing. What it comes down to, at the end of the day, is this: a purple character is written from the inside. The good thing? People want purple.

What's in a Name? How To Choose Character Names for Fiction what’s the big deal about naming your character? I mean, a name is a name, right? Everybody has one. Whether you realize it or not, everyone associates names with people they know. To test this theory, what’s the first thing that comes to your mind when you think of the following names? There are always exceptions and these names can possibly be used within the right story and setting. The more characters involved in your novel or short story, the more carefully you will need to consider their names. Names depend greatly on the era in which your story takes place. According to Babynames.com, the top American names in 2007 included Emma, Madeline, Hailey, Ava, Olivia, Caitlyn, Jacob, Ryan, Caleb, Ethan, Aidan, and Connor. If your character’s parents are involved in the story, consider what type of people they are, or were, when your character was born. Also bear in mind the readers you are targeting. Other famous names could be used sparingly. Variety is always a good thing.

25 Ways To Plot, Plan and Prep Your Story I’m a panster at heart, plotter by necessity — and I always advocate learning how to plot and plan because inevitably someone on the business side of things is going to poke you with a pointy stick and say, “I want this.” Thus you will demonstrate your talent. Even so, in choosing to plot on your own, you aren’t limited to a single path. The Basic Vanilla Tried-And-True Outline The basic and essential outline. The Reverse Outline Start at the end, instead. Tentpole Moments A story in your head may require certain keystone events to be part of the plot. Beginning, Middle, End Write three paragraphs, each detailing the rough three acts found in every story: the inciting incident and outcome of the beginning (Act I), the escalation and conflict in the middle (Act II), the climactic culmination of events and the ease-down denoument of the end (Act III). A Series Of Sequences Chapter-By-Chapter For novel writers, you can chart your story by its chapters. Beat Sheet Mind-Maps Zero Draft Dialogue Pass

Seven Common Character Types Seven Common Character Types by Terry W. Ervin II Fiction writers employ a variety of characters while weaving their tales. Beyond the standard definitions of protagonist (the main character in a literary work) and antagonist (the main character or force that opposes the protagonist in a literary work), recognizing the types of characters and the parts they play while reading an interesting story can add to the experience. In addition, a fuller understanding of the character types and their uses can increase a writer’s effectiveness in weaving his own fictional tales. Below is a list of common character types, followed by an explanation and short example. Confidante- someone in whom the central character confides, thus revealing the main character’s personality, thoughts, and intentions. Example: In a story, Melvin Sanders is a detective on the trail of a serial killer. In this example Chops is a confidante. In this example Ebenezer Scrooge is a dynamic character. Copyright © Terry W.

10 Days of Character Building: Wrap Up Character Bio Sheets A bio sheet is a way of keeping track of a character’s physical description, traits and attributes. This method is familiar to anyone who enjoys role playing games such as Dungeons and Dragons. Using a Bio Sheet gives you an excellent reference point to go back to when you need to remember key information about your character. Defining Characters By Their Roles There are specific roles that characters fall into when you are writing a story. Building a Character Using Multiple Perspectives This technique helps you to build relationships. Key Questions This is a simple list of questions that provide insight into your character and how your character fits into your story. Basing Characters on Real People We often draw inspiration for fictional characters from people we know in real life. A Day in the Life Once the events of a story kick into motion, main characters are pushed outside of their boundaries and comfort zones. Interview Biography Possessions Brainstorming

Character Survey of Doom Surname Meanings and Origins - Find the Meaning of Your Last Name Have you ever wondered about the meaning of your last name or where your family surname came from? What your ancestors did, how they looked or where they lived? Surname meanings can sometimes tell a story about your family, one handed down for hundreds of years. By tracing the possible origin of your last name, you can learn more about the medieval ancestors who first bore the surname and, ultimately, handed it down to you. Select a Letter to Find Your Surname Meaning To learn more about your last name meaning and ethnic origin, just browse to the appropriate letter in the Surname Meanings and Origins Glossary for your last name. When searching for the origin or etymology of your surname it is also important to consider that your last name may not have always been spelled the way that it is today. Can't find your last name in the Surname Meanings Glossary?

Random Generators! - LOTS Run out of ideas for your latest novel or roleplaying game? Has your writing or artistic muse abandoned you? Does your creativity just need a kick in the pants? You've come to the right place - with the click of a button, new ideas are yours for the taking. Tip: If you want to use a random generator on a computer with no Internet access, save the file to a portable drive. Randomly-Chosen Random Generator Let random chance take you to your destination! Fandom-Relevant Generator Index Browse a list of popular fandoms to find generators relevant to your interests, be they Doctor Who, The Avengers, Sherlock, Dungeons & Dragons, or many, many more. Worldbuilding-Relevant Generator Index Browse a list of random generators useful for building worlds and cultures. Name GeneratorsNames for characters, places, and more. Human & Humanoid Character Generators Profiles and descriptions for humans and things mostly resembling humans. Location & Setting Generators Places for your story to happen in.

Handling a Cast of Thousands - Part I: Getting to Know Your Characters by Will Greenway Few writing challenges are greater than doing justice to a large cast of characters in a novel or story. In fact, the difference between simply doing them justice and handling them well is a significant level of effort in itself. Sadly, this is one of those writer conundrums that is often best resolved with a "Don't do that if it hurts" solution. Getting a grip on your cast Cast members are reoccurring characters who are pivotal to your story. Aside from your main cast, there will be supporting roles, and often dozens of walk-on or cameo characters. Least significant, but always necessary, are walk-ons and cameos. Because of the limited time these characters spend in the frame, writers tend to make them more exotic, giving them odd quirks or ticks in order to make them interesting. Beware of "extras" with aspirations of star status. Don't promote these exotic latecomers to cast status. Casting couch -- criteria for success A viewpoint character carries a heavy onus.

It's Not What They Say... by Mary Cook In fiction writing it's the dialogue that lifts your characters off the page. You must ensure your writing is strong enough for the task. It's not what they say; it's the way they say it Speech has a natural rhythm, like music. You can tell a lot about a character by his verbal mannerisms. One person might use "you know" a great deal, while another opens nearly every sentence with "Well". Punctuation is almost as important as the words. Punctuation is also important from a style point of view. Don't use the exclamation point too freely. You can learn a lot about realistic dialogue by eavesdropping on other people's conversations. Don't be tempted to write with a regional accent by introducing strange spellings. Anyone who has read Somerset Maugham's Liza of Lambeth will know what I mean. For example, the following dialogue on the subject of childbirth could lead the reader to think Maugham couldn't spell or was writing in a foreign language: Cut out the superfluous words.

Character Flaw Index To make characters realistic and relatable they are given flaws, because if there is anything a writer can be sure of it is that no one in their audience will be perfect. Flaws are character traits that have a negative impact in the narrative, unless they are simply informed. They can also be exploited. See Good Flaws, Bad Flaws for a scale of flaw acceptability. Compare Seven Deadly Sins, Ego Tropes. Abusive Parents: Habitually violent and cruel to their own children, often because that's how they themselves were raised.

How to Pick Character Names: The 7 Rules of Choosing Names for Fictional Characters Choosing a character name for your novel is as pressure-filled as picking a name for a baby. It has to suit the character’s personality, makes sense for the era and, most important, be super awesome (sorry friends, the awesome name of Brian A. Klems is already taken by this guy). I stumbled upon these seven great rules for choosing character names offered up by popular mystery writer Elizabeth Sims (the Rita Farmer Mysteries). 1. It’s better to call a character Caleb, which means “faithful” or “faithful dog,” than to overkill it by naming him Loyal or Goodman—unless you want that for comic/ironic purposes. 2. If you need a name for an 18-year-old shopgirl in a corset store in 1930s Atlanta, you know enough not to choose Sierra or Courtney, unless such an unusual name is part of your story. 3. Your novel might become an audiobook or an e-book with text-to-speech enabled. 4. 5. 6. You might notice that in most crime fiction the murderer rarely has a middle name or initial. 7.

Related:  Writing