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Homeland (TV Series 2011– )

Homeland (TV Series 2011– )
Edit Storyline Carrie Mathison, a CIA operations officer, is on probation after carrying out an unauthorized operation in Iraq. As a result, she has been reassigned to the Counter terrorism center. Whilst in Iraq, she was warned that an American prisoner had been turned by Al-Qaeda. When Nicholas Brody, a U.S. Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis Edit Did You Know? Trivia Although Carrie's condition was not specified during the show's first few episodes, the actor who plays her, Claire Danes (who considered majoring in psychology at Yale) told "Entertainment Weekly" that she decided that Carrie has Bipolar 1. Goofs Brody (and other US Marines) are referred to multiple times as "soldiers", including by a character who claims he was with a UDT (or underwater demolition team, a "sister" team to the Navy SEALs who have to pass the same training). Soundtracks Homeland Main Title Written by Sean Callery Performed by Sean Callery Feat.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1796960/

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