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National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery

The Photojojo Store! - the Most Awesome Photo Gifts and Gear for Photographers 15 Books You Should Have Read in 2010 - Culture Image by Jane Mount, Courtesy 20x200 Yes, we read Freedom this year and yes, it was good. As Esquire put it, it “was one great slab of a book, at a time when most books have given up on greatness.” But there were other books in 2010, books that had to compete for our ever more challenged attention spans and won. So we asked a few members of the GOOD team & some of our good colleagues which book made their best list this past year. (And since discovering something you might have missed is one of the great pleasures of reading, no selections were disqualified for having been published prior to 2010). 1. Author: Stephen King Recommended by: Ben Jervey, Environment Editor Why read? 2. Author: George R.R. Recommended by: Morgan Clendaniel, Deputy Editor, GOOD Why read? 3. Author: Jan Gehl Recommended by: Alissa Walker, Contributing Editor, GOOD Why read? 4. Author: Tom Rachman Recommended by: Zach Frechette, Editor in Chief, GOOD Why read? 5. Author: Walter Van Tillburg Clark Why Read? 6. Why read?

Kant's View of the Mind and Consciousness of Self First published Mon Jul 26, 2004; substantive revision Tue Jan 22, 2013 Even though Kant himself held that his view of the mind and consciousness were inessential to his main purpose, some of his ideas came to have an enormous influence on his successors. Ideas central to his view are now central to cognitive science. 1. In this article, we will focus on Immanuel Kant's (1724–1804) work on the mind and consciousness of self and related issues. Some commentators believe that Kant's views on the mind are dependent on his idealism (he called it transcendental idealism). In general structure, Kant's model of the mind was the dominant model in the empirical psychology that flowed from his work and then again, after a hiatus during which behaviourism reigned supreme (roughly 1910 to 1965), toward the end of the 20th century, especially in cognitive science. Three ideas define the basic shape (‘cognitive architecture’) of Kant's model and one its dominant method. 2. 2.1 Transcendental Aesthetic

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A photographic exhibition of notable American women of the 20th century; from the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. by nda_librarian Apr 28

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