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Gardening - Gardening Guides

Gardening - Gardening Guides
Related:  Gardening

Gardening Resources :: National Gardening Association Homegrown and Handmade Our food system is dominated by industrial agriculture, and has become economically and environmentally unsustainable. The incidence of diet-related diseases including obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and heart disease has skyrocketed to unprecedented levels. Whether you have 40 acres and a mule or a condo with a balcony, you can do more than you think to safeguard your health, your money and the planet. Homegrown and Handmade shows how making things from scratch and growing at least some of your own food can help you eliminate artificial ingredients from your diet, reduce your carbon footprint, and create a more authentic life. Whether your goal is increasing your self-reliance or becoming a full-fledged homesteader, it's packed with answers and solutions to help you: Take control of your food supply from seed to plate Raise small and medium livestock for fun, food and fiber Rediscover traditional skills to meet more of your family's needs than you ever thought possible.

The urban guide to being self sufficient'ish This is an easy recipe to follow and creates a delightful, if not usual tasting beer. It is very cheap to make and follows a traditionally english recipe. Before hops were widely used in the 17th century all sorts of plant were used to flavor the ale including nettles. Ingredients 900grams (2lb) young nettle tops 3.8lts (1 gallon) of water 230 grams (8oz) of sugar, brown or demarrara sugar works best. 7.5 grams (0.25oz) of fresh yeast small piece of toast 7.5 grams (0.25oz) of ground ginger Method Boil the nettle tops in the water for half an hour (you will need a very large pan for this or preferably a cauldron). Keeping the mixture, strain and add sugar, stirring to dissolve. Spread the yeast onto the toast and float on the surface of the nettle liquid. Strain again and put into clean, strong screw top beer bottles, or sealable wine bottles (I used plastic bottles and it still worked). Growing in a small space tests even the greenest of fingers. False Economy Small Space and small budget

Beginner’s Guide to Veganic Gardening Vegan-organic gardening avoids not only the use of toxic sprays and chemicals, but also manures and animal remains. Just as vegans avoid animal products in the rest of our lives, we also avoid using animal products in the garden, as fertilizers such as blood and bone meal, slaughterhouse sludge, fish emulsion, and manures are sourced from industries that exploit and enslave sentient beings. As these products may carry dangerous diseases that breed in intensive animal production operations, vegan-organic gardening is also a safer, healthier way to grow our food. In veganic growing situations, soil fertility is maintained using vegetable compost, green manures, crop rotation, mulching, and other sustainable, ecological methods. A border of marigolds helps to deter certain insects, and they also have a root system that improves the soil. Green Manures (and nitrogen-fixing crops) Green Manure is a cover crop of plants, which is grown with the specific purpose of being tilled into the soil.

16 Foods That’ll Re-Grow from Kitchen Scraps By Andy Whiteley Co- Founder of Wake Up World Looking for a healthy way to get more from your garden? Like to know your food is free of the pesticides and other nasties that are often sprayed on commercial crops? Re-growing food from your kitchen scraps is a good way to do it! There’s nothing like eating your own home- grown vegies, and there are heaps of different foods that will re- grow from the scrap pieces that you’d normally throw out or put into your compost bin. It’s fun. Just remember … the quality of the “parent” vegetable scrap will help to determine the quality of the re-growth. Leeks, Scallions, Spring Onions and Fennel You can either use the white root end of a vegetable that you have already cut, or buy a handful of new vegetables to use specifically for growing. Simply place the white root end in a glass jar with a little water, and leave it in a sunny position. Lemongrass Lemongrass grows just like any other grass. Within a week or so, new growth will start to appear. Ginger

Raised Beds: Preparing your Garden Beds for Spring This may sound odd to you, but my favorite season in the garden is early spring, after our raised beds are prepared but before anything is growing. The sight of the raised beds topped up with rich soil, moist and crumbly, free of weeds and ready to plant is a brief moment of perfection, full of promise, a blank canvas awaiting the gardener’s vision. When raised beds are well prepared, the hardest part of gardening is also done. And the better the garden beds are prepared, the less work there will be during the growing season, and the more likely the gardener’s vision will come to fruition. Here are some tips for preparing your raised beds for a bountiful growing season. Work from outside the beds. When gardening in raised beds, try to adhere to the one basic ‘ground’ rule: Don’t step on the soil within the raised beds. When you build or buy raised beds, be sure you’re able to reach every part of the bed without having to stand in it. Turn under, or smother, green manure cover crops.

ferns Natural Hebicide How Weed Killers Work Weed killers, both homemade and commercial products, start by killing the above ground foliage. Systemic weed killers, like Roundup, are designed to cause injury to the entire plant including the root system so it will not grow back, according to a guide prepared by the University of California available here. Homemade vinegar-based products lack the oomph of commercial products and only desiccate the above ground foliage. 3 Homemade Weed Killer Recipes A quick search on the internet yielded lots of recipes for homemade weed killer with vinegar the primary ingredient. Weed Killer Recipe #1: Plain vinegar Weed Killer Recipe #2: 1 quart vinegar + 2 tbsp liquid dish soap Weed Killer Recipe #3: 1 quart vinegar + 1 tsp liquid dish soap + 1/4 c salt Application It's important to apply weed killer on a sunny day after the morning dew has evaporated and with no rain in the forecast for at least 24 hours so the product is not diluted with water. My Results

flowering plant How to: Save Heirloom Tomato Seeds Cubit's Organic Living » Saving your own tomato seeds is rather fun and has all sorts of benefits. Preserving heirloom seeds, ensuring a supply of your own favourites for next year, helping protect seed diversity, making a giant mess of stinky fermenting goo, it’s all there! It’s also pretty easy. As part of our seed selling business we save fairly large quantities of tomato seed but the process is the same whether you are saving from a pile of heirloom tomatoes or from a paticularily tasty one you just sliced up for lunch. First things first, you need to get your tomato seeds out of the tomato. Next the seed pulp is ready to be combined with water in a container. Make sure to label each variety as you go as tomato seeds all look very similar and the coloured pulp is going to break down. Place them out of direct sunlight and walk away for a few days. Now things will start to ferment. Once the seeds are ready, pour off any remaining pulp and mould. Using a strainer, give your seeds a final rinse.

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