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The Best Interview about drugs : Terence McKenna in Mexico 1996

The Best Interview about drugs : Terence McKenna in Mexico 1996
Related:  neuropharmacology/(religious/spiritual)

Terence McKenna Vault Terence McKenna was a psychedelic author, explorer, and showman. He was born in 1946 and grew up in Paonia, Colorado. In high school he moved to Los Altos, California, and from there attended U.C. Berkeley for two years before setting off to see the world. In 1975, Terence graduated from Berkeley with a degree in ecology, resource conservation, and shamanism. In 1985, Terence co-founded the non-profit Botanical Dimensions, with Kathleen Harrison-McKenna, to collect and propagate medicinal and shamanic plants from around the world. He spent the last few years of his life living in Hawaii, and died of brain cancer at the age of 53.

Varieties of Nondual Realization (c) Copyright 2006 by Timothy Conway [Note: This paper was originally written as a rather free-wheeling overview essay for professionals in the mental health field and/or satsang leaders of nondually-oriented gatherings. For this web-version of the essay, I have removed all diacritical marks. Boldfaced numbers refer to endnotes at the end of the essay.] Right HERE is the Heart of existence—Pure Solid Awareness—the profound Truth or Reality1 of whatever experience/experiencer arises. In the grand dream of life, it is historically significant that western psychology, through the work of cutting-edge theorists and clinicians, has increasingly integrated the traditionally mystical-spiritual nondual perspective. Reflecting on 35 years’ study and over 20 years of facilitating nondual realization for friends, students, and clients, I notice how authentic Nondual Realization can be a veritable panacea, bringing undreamed of peace, freedom, solidarity with all life, and real bliss.

| HOT COFFEE, a documentary feature film Sam Harris on Spirituality without Religion, Happiness, and How to Cultivate the Art of Presence by Maria Popova “Our world is dangerously riven by religious doctrines that all educated people should condemn, and yet there is more to understanding the human condition than science and secular culture generally admit.” Nietzsche’s famous proclamation that “God is dead” is among modern history’s most oft-cited aphorisms, and yet as is often the case with its ilk, such quotations often miss the broader context in a way that bespeaks the lazy reductionism with which we tend to approach questions of spirituality today. Nietzsche himself clarified the full dimension of his statement six years later, in a passage from The Twilight of Idols, where he explained that “God” simply signified the supersensory realm, or “true world,” and wrote: “We have abolished the true world. What has remained? The apparent one perhaps? Sam Harris by Bara Vetenskap Harris writes: Our minds are all we have. It would not be too strong to say that I felt sane for the first time in my life. Donating = Loving

An Interview with Douglas R. Hofstadter, following ''I am a Strange Loop'' Douglas R. Hofstadter is best-known for his book Gödel, Escher, Bach (GEB for short). In his latest book, I am a Strange Loop, he visits once again many of the themes originally presented in that book. The interview below was conducted in September 2007 and was originally published, in Hebrew, in the online culture magazine Haayal Hakore. The interview was conducted by Tal Cohen and Yarden Nir-Buchbinder. The first part of I am a Strange Loop reads like a condensed version of GEB, by explaining the idea of consciousness as a strange loop. I certainly did not believe intelligent machines were just around the corner when I wrote GEB. Am I disappointed by the amount of progress in cognitive science and AI in the past 30 years or so? I am a deep admirer of humanity at its finest and deepest and most powerful — of great people such as Helen Keller, Albert Einstein, Ella Fitzgerald, Albert Schweitzer, Frederic Chopin, Raoul Wallenberg, Fats Waller, and on and on. We'll return to Kurzweil soon.

I Am a Strange Loop I Am a Strange Loop is a 2007 book by Douglas Hofstadter, examining in depth the concept of a strange loop to explain the sense of "I". The concept of a strange loop was originally developed in his 1979 book Gödel, Escher, Bach. Hofstadter had previously expressed disappointment with how Gödel, Escher, Bach, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1980 for general nonfiction, was received. In the preface to its 20th-anniversary edition, Hofstadter laments that the book was perceived as a hodgepodge of neat things with no central theme. Hofstadter seeks to remedy this problem in I Am a Strange Loop by focusing and expounding on the central message of Gödel, Escher, Bach. As an exploration of the sense of "I", Hofstadter explores his own life, and those to whom he has been close.[4][5][6][7][8][9] See also[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ Hofstadter, Douglas R. (1999).

Strange loop A strange loop arises when, by moving only upwards or downwards through a hierarchical system, one finds oneself back to where one started. Strange loops may involve self-reference and paradox. The concept of a strange loop was proposed and extensively discussed by Douglas Hofstadter in Gödel, Escher, Bach, and is further elaborated in Hofstadter's book I Am a Strange Loop, published in 2007. A tangled hierarchy is a hierarchical consciousness system in which a strange loop appears. Definitions[edit] A strange loop is a hierarchy of levels, each of which is linked to at least one other by some type of relationship. In I Am a Strange Loop, Hofstadter defines strange loops as follows: In cognitive science[edit] Hofstadter argues that the psychological self arises out of a similar kind of paradox. Strangeness[edit] Downward causality[edit] Hofstadter claims a similar "flipping around of causality" appears to happen in minds possessing self-consciousness. Examples[edit] See also[edit] Tanenbaum, P.

Syncretism Syncretism /ˈsɪŋkrətɪzəm/ is the combining of different, often seemingly contradictory beliefs, while melding practices of various schools of thought. Syncretism involves the merger and analogizing of several originally discrete traditions, especially in the theology and mythology of religion, thus asserting an underlying unity and allowing for an inclusive approach to other faiths. Syncretism also occurs commonly in expressions of arts and culture (known as eclecticism) as well as politics (syncretic politics). Nomenclature, orthography, and etymology[edit] The Oxford English Dictionary first attests the word syncretism in English in 1618. It derives from modern Latin syncretismus, drawing on Greek συγκρητισμός (synkretismos), meaning "Cretan federation". The Greek word occurs in Plutarch's (1st century AD) essay on "Fraternal Love" in his Moralia (2.490b). Social and political roles[edit] Religious syncretism[edit] Ancient Greece[edit] Judaism[edit] Roman world[edit] Christianity[edit]

Erowid Psilocybin Advanced Cancer Anxiety Study The primary objective of this double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study is to assess the efficacy of psilocybin administration (4-phosphoryloxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine), a serotonergic psychoactive agent, on psychosocial distress, with the specific primary outcome variable being anxiety associated with cancer. Secondary outcome measures will look at the effect of psilocybin on symptoms of pain perception, depression, existential/psychospiritual distress, attitudes towards disease progression and death, quality of life, and spiritual/mystical states of consciousness. In addition, a secondary objective of the study is to determine the feasibility of administering psilocybin to this patient population, with regards to the following issues: safety, patient recruitment, consent for treatment, and retention.

Psilocybin mushroom Psilocybin mushrooms, also known as psychedelic mushrooms, are mushrooms that contain the psychedelic drugs psilocybin and psilocin. Common colloquial terms include magic mushrooms and shrooms.[1] Biological genera containing psilocybin mushrooms include Copelandia, Galerina, Gymnopilus, Inocybe, Mycena, Panaeolus, Pholiotina, Pluteus, and Psilocybe. About 40 species are found in the genus Psilocybe. Psilocybin mushrooms have likely been used since prehistoric times and may have been depicted in rock art. History[edit] Early[edit] Archaeological evidence indicates the use of psilocybin-containing mushrooms in ancient times. Hallucinogenic species of the psilocybe genus have a history of use among the native peoples of Mesoamerica for religious communion, divination, and healing, from pre-Columbian times to the present day. Modern[edit] Inspired by the Wassons' Life article, Timothy Leary traveled to Mexico to experience psilocybin mushrooms firsthand. Occurrence[edit] Effects[edit]

Peyotism and Native American Spirituality Earlier we had spoken how marijuana has been used in India and is still used across the country during festivals like Holi in the form of bhang. The Rig-Veda is the chief of the four vedas of ancient India, that consists of hymns and prayers sung well before 800 BC to worship Gods – it speaks of Soma, a potent drink produced from an unidentified plant. It was drunk only at sacrifices, and caused the most invigorating effects. Today we shall take a look across the world at Native American spirituality revolving around the use of entheogens, the current use of Peyote and the chemical Mescaline that is derived from it and widely used as a recreational drug. The exact date as to when man started using Peyote is not known, but at an archaeological excavation in Texas, a radiocarbon analysis showed that the specimens of Peyote found there were dated between 3780 and 3660 BC. Lets take a look at a Peyote ritual –

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