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The Best Interview about drugs : Terence McKenna in Mexico 1996

The Best Interview about drugs : Terence McKenna in Mexico 1996

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uow__z3Qo8c

Related:  EntheogenicGod's Lil' Helper Manna from Heavenneuropharmacology/(religious/spiritual)

Terence McKenna Vault Terence McKenna was a psychedelic author, explorer, and showman. He was born in 1946 and grew up in Paonia, Colorado. In high school he moved to Los Altos, California, and from there attended U.C. Berkeley for two years before setting off to see the world.

Griffiths psilocybin The following Q&A is with Roland Griffiths, the study’s lead researcher. Q 1: Why did you undertake this research? In the 1950s and 1960s, basic science and applied research studies were taking place with hallucinogens, offering hints that they might be of value in psychotherapy, addiction treatment, and creativity enhancement, and suggestions that the hallucinogens can occasion mystical-type experiences. Laws enacted in response to excesses of the "psychedelic 1960s" stopped almost all that work, leaving some promising threads dangling. Despite ongoing illicit and licit use, remarkably little is known, from the standpoint of modern psychopharmacology research, about the acute and long-term effects of the hallucinogens.

Pineal Gland - Our Third Eye: The Biggest Cover-Up in Human History Mystic Banana Waking Times The pineal gland (also called the pineal body, epiphysis cerebri, epiphysis or the “third eye”) is a small endocrine gland in the vertebrate brain. It produces the serotonin derivative melatonin, a hormone that affects the modulation of wake/sleep patterns and seasonal functions. About Craigslist Joe In a time when America’s economy and sense of community were crumbling, one guy left everything behind – to see if he could survive solely on the support of the 21st century’s new town square: Craigslist. As of recent, the United States found itself in one of the most precarious financial meltdowns in modern history. News programs spoke of the worst economy since the great depression and demise of the American Dream.

Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a potent psychedelic compound that is found within many plants and mammals, including humans. It is used as a recreational drug to induce near death, mystical, spiritual and other-worldly experiences. It has been outlawed all over the world. In the United States DMT is classed as a Schedule 1 drug under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, and in the UK it is listed as a Class A drug. Peter Gandy (author) The Complete Guide to World Mysticism (1998)The Hermetica: The Lost Wisdom of the Pharaohs (1998)The Wisdom of the Pagan Philosophers (The Wisdom of the World) (1999)The Jesus Mysteries: Was the "Original Jesus" a Pagan God? (1999)Jesus and the Lost Goddess: The Secret Teachings of the Original Christians (2002)The Laughing Jesus: Religious Lies and Gnostic Wisdom (2005)The Gospel of the Second Coming (2007)

Varieties of Nondual Realization (c) Copyright 2006 by Timothy Conway [Note: This paper was originally written as a rather free-wheeling overview essay for professionals in the mental health field and/or satsang leaders of nondually-oriented gatherings. For this web-version of the essay, I have removed all diacritical marks. Boldfaced numbers refer to endnotes at the end of the essay.] How to Grow Calea Zacatechichi from Seeds and Cuttings « worldseedsupply.org Calea zacatechichi is the most well-known of several dreaming herbs that make up the class known as oneirogens. Other dreaming herbs include Silene Capensis (African Dream Root), Entada Rheedii and Artemisia Vulgaris (Mugwort). Dream herbs are used to induce lucid dreaming, which, most accurately is described as an awareness that you are dreaming to the point that you can control dreams. But, on a more basic level, dream herbs also seem to be linked to increased dream recall or simply an awareness that you are dreaming even if you cannot control the dream.

Aldous Huxley Aldous Leonard Huxley /ˈhʌksli/ (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer, philosopher and a prominent member of the Huxley family. He was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian London, and for non-fiction books, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug, and a wide-ranging output of essays. Early in his career Huxley edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories and poetry. Sam Harris on Spirituality without Religion, Happiness, and How to Cultivate the Art of Presence by Maria Popova “Our world is dangerously riven by religious doctrines that all educated people should condemn, and yet there is more to understanding the human condition than science and secular culture generally admit.” Nietzsche’s famous proclamation that “God is dead” is among modern history’s most oft-cited aphorisms, and yet as is often the case with its ilk, such quotations often miss the broader context in a way that bespeaks the lazy reductionism with which we tend to approach questions of spirituality today. Nietzsche himself clarified the full dimension of his statement six years later, in a passage from The Twilight of Idols, where he explained that “God” simply signified the supersensory realm, or “true world,” and wrote: “We have abolished the true world. What has remained? The apparent one perhaps?

Tryptamine from Tryptophan - [www.rhodium.ws] The by far easiest method to synthesize tryptamine is the decarboxylation of the amino acid tryptophan. Both the natural form of tryptophan (L-tryptophan) as well as the synthetic form (DL-tryptophan) can be used with the same good results, both variants are fully interchangeable in the syntheses below. A good way to purify tryptamine without having to resort to distillation under strong vacuum is to dissolve the crude tryptamine hydrochloride in water, adjust the pH to between 7.6 and 8.2 and extract the solution with chloroform. The pH is then adjusted to 14 with NaOH and the pure tryptamine is filtered off with suction and air dried. Experimental Decarboxylation in Diphenyl Ether1

Kathleen Harrison Vault : Kat Harrison, Botanical Dimensions, and the Shamanic Plant Mind Since the introduction of shamanic plants and medicines to Western science, many anthropologists and laboratory wizards have struggled to divine their cultural significance and figure out how they work their peculiar magic. Yet, in spite of all the work done in university laboratories, sterile hospitals, and million-dollar pharmaceutical research wings, conventional science has done little to unravel the ancient mysteries of shamanic healing power. Divorced from traditional contexts, shamanic folk medicines and visionary practices have remained a mystery. It is only recently, through the work of researchers in the "softer" sciences of ethno- and entheobotany, that the true role of these plants could be understood in terms the Western mind could appreciate. Despite the ancient wisdom and power offered by these plant spirits, shamanic plants and practices are now threatened by the encroachment of industrialized forces into rainforest societies.

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