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The 6 Most Mind-Blowing Things Ever Discovered in Space

The 6 Most Mind-Blowing Things Ever Discovered in Space
It's actually really easy to think of space as boring. The planets in our own solar system all seem to be empty rocks or balls of gas, and you find a whole lot of nothing before you get to the next star. Meanwhile, Hollywood's most creative minds can't get past populating the place with planets that look a whole lot like Earth (and specifically, parts of California) featuring monsters, rapey aliens or Muppets. But real space is far, far stranger. #6. Science fiction writers have this annoying thing they do where they can only think of like five different types of planets. But scientists have studied almost 700 real planets outside the solar system, and some of them are downright gaudy. Via Inewp.comIt's a wedding gem worthy of Jesus or the Sultan of Dubai. How Is This Even Possible? The universe's biggest showoff actually used to be a star, and sometimes the debris that's left over after the star dies starts a second career as a planet. Via Spaceflightnow.comWhat a dick! #5. #4. Wrong! Related:  astronomy, outer space and our solar system

Scientists Now Know: We're From Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy! Scientists Now Know: We're Not From Here! Summary & comments by Dan Eden for Viewzone "This first full-sky map of Sagittarius shows its extensive interaction with the Milky Way," Majewski said. The study's map of M giants depicts 2 billion years of Sagittarius stripping by the Milky Way, and suggests that Sagittarius has reached a critical phase in what had been a slow dance of death. "After slow, continuous gnawing by the Milky Way, Sagittarius has been whittled down to the point that it cannot hold itself together much longer," said 2MASS Science Team member and study co-author Martin Weinberg of the University of Massachusetts. Does this mean we are at a unique moment in the life of our galaxy? "Whenever possible, astronomers appeal to the principle that we are not at a special time or place in the universe," Majewski said. On the other hand, Majewski and his colleagues have been surprised by the Earth's proximity to a portion of the Sagittarius debris. Implications in Global Warming?

Interactive 3D model of Solar System Planets and Night Sky maverick science.com Space's 10 Most Gigantic Objects Astronomical Resources on the Internet Astronomical Resources on the Internet Joe Kraus Science Librarian University of Denver, Denver, COjokraus@du.edu Pete Banholzer Technical Information Specialist Goddard Space Flight Center Librarypbanholz@library.gsfc.nasa.gov IntroductionAudience, Scope & MethodologyStarting PointsArticle & Preprint Databases Journals & Magazines Books Catalogs and Data Centers Organizations Software Observing Programs Telescope Making Educational Resources Online Star Charts Terminology Miscellaneous Web SitesReferences Introduction Astronomical information has been available online since the early days of the Internet. Many astronomical organizations have been ahead of the curve in utilizing the Internet for electronic publication. Worldwide, amateur astronomers greatly outnumber professional astronomers. Audience, Scope & Methodology The scope of this webliography is to point people to some of the best resources on the web for astronomical research and information. Starting Points Journals & Magazines

Newborn Star's 'Snow Line' Reveals Clues About Planet Formation Astronomers have identified the point where carbon monoxide (CO) freezes in the disk around a sunlike star — information that could help them understand how planets form. A team of international scientists has calculated the CO "snow line" for a star called TW Hydrae, determining that the gas solidifies at about the distance of the orbit of Neptune, where it could help feed the formation of the outer edges of the system. "The CO snow line is interesting, not only because CO is abundant in the disks, but its snow line is the most accessible to direct observations due to its low freeze-out temperature — it's farther away from the star," said principal investigator Chunhua Qi of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "It could mark the starting point where smaller icy bodies, like comets, and dwarf planets, like Pluto, would begin to form." [Our Solar System: A Photo Tour of the Planets] Tracer ions Stars form when a disk of dust and gas collapses in on itself due to gravity.

NASA Funds 12 Far-Out Space Tech Ideas NASA has granted funding to a dozen imaginative tech concepts, in the hopes that one or more of them will lead to big breakthroughs in space science and exploration. The 12 ideas, which were selected under Phase 1 of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program, are ambitious and varied. One aims to build biomaterials such as human tissue with a 3D printer, for example, while another proposes to induce deep-sleep torpor states in astronauts making the long journey to Mars. "These new Phase 1 selections include potential breakthroughs for Earth and space science, diverse operations and the potential for new paths that expand human civilization and commerce into space," NIAC program executive Jay Falker said in a statement. Phase 1 awards are worth about $100,000. The 12 selected concepts, along with their principal investigators, are: — Pulsed Fission-Fusion (PuFF) Propulsion System (Rob Adams, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center)

12 Pictures of Space You Won't Believe Aren't Photoshopped Look, we all know that space is the final frontier, that space is cold and unforgiving and that in it, nobody can hear you scream. But what you might not know is that, when it thinks nobody is looking, space puts on a frilly dress, covers its forearms in honey and spins around until it falls over ... because space is just flat-out crazy as hell. Oh, don't take our word for it or anything; we have photographic evidence. #12. Jupiter in Motion You know what Jupiter looks like -- kind of like a dirty marble -- and you know, objectively, that those bands and swirls you're looking at are all big storms. GIF BinIT'S GETTING CLOSER! You might have seen this before in the movie Another Earth, but if not, well, now you have this time-lapse gif to haunt your existential nightmares for the rest of time. #11. Big Bear Solar Observatory via Discovery News #10. Remember that famous face on Mars that turned out to be a big, fat nothing? By God, that was one hell of an ARG. The Crowned FacesIs that ... #9.

Actual Sound of Space - NASA Voyager Recordings Embrace the lumpiverse: How mess kills dark energy - physics-math - 25 June 2014 (Image: Darren Hopes) An elegant assumption underpins our cosmic model: that everything looks the same everywhere. But does it make us see things that aren't there? A DOOR flies open but no one's there. A vase levitates from the mantelpiece and hurls itself across the room. The universe today is a little like one of those ghost movies. Not an overly superstitious bunch, cosmologists invent names for the poltergeists responsible – dark matter, dark flows, dark energy – and invest a lot of effort in proving they are real.

Dead galaxies defy galactic formation theories - space - 01 September 2005 The largest galaxies in 93 galactic clusters near the Milky Way stopped forming stars 13 billion years ago, a new study reveals. The stagnant behemoths appear to challenge the leading theory that such large objects grew up gradually over time from the merger of smaller objects. Black holes lurking at their centres may be responsible for the arrested development. Astronomers using a 3.5-metre telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona, US, and a 4-metre telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in La Serena, Chile, made the discovery after studying the spectra of about 4100 "red" galaxies within about a billion light years of the Milky Way. The survey found that the largest galaxies had already stopped forming stars about 13 billion years ago, when the Universe was only about 700 million years old. Hierarchical clustering "From hierarchical modelling, we would have expected to see more star formation later on and we didn't," says Suntzeff. Curious behaviour

It's crunch time for dark matter if WIMPs don't show - space - 28 May 2014 If dark matter isn't made of WIMPs, could neutrinos or axions fit the bill? What if it's not a particle at all but a strange modification of gravity? ROADS may soon diverge in the dark matter wood, and some physicists want to take the ones less travelled. The most promising candidate for a dark matter particle could be about to show itself at last, as it is running out of places to hide. But should the hunters fail to bag one of these WIMPs, or weakly interacting massive particles, the search for dark matter could be thrown into crisis. At a meeting in Cambridge, Massachusetts, last week, researchers debated the best paths forward into the wilder landscape of less-favoured candidates, from alternate particles to changes to our theory of gravity. "It's really refreshing," says Lisa Randall at Harvard University. So far we have only sensed dark matter's presence through its gravitational effects. The trouble is that background noise can prevent usnoticing the impact of a WIMP. WIMPy Suburbs

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