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Greenwich

Greenwich
Eating & Drinking Greenwich has a great variety of Italian, Japanese, Thai, Chinese, Indian and Mexican restaurants to suit every budget. Grab breakfast in a cafe, enjoy a quick lunch from a Greenwich market stall or... Read more... Shopping Shopping in Greenwich is easy and fun - you can walk everywhere and easily enjoy the fascinating combination of historic Greenwich Market, and quirky, independent and designer shops, plus...

http://www.visitgreenwich.org.uk/

Related:  Voyage a Londres

Tate Modern Southwark (Jubilee Line, 600 metres approx Blackfriars: District and Circle Line, 800 metres approx St Paul’s: Central Line, 1,100 metres approx. Routes 45, 63 and 100 stop on Blackfriars Bridge Road Routes RV1 and 381 stop on Southwark Street Route 344 stops on Southwark Bridge Road Blackfriars 300 metres from the South exit; 800 metres from the North exit. London Bridge 1,100 metres approx.

Piccadilly Circus The Circus lies at the intersection of five main roads: Regent Street, Shaftesbury Avenue, Piccadilly Street, Covent Street and Haymarket. It was created by John Nash as part of the future King George IV's plan to connect Carlton House - where the Prince Regent resided - with Regent's Park. The creation of Shaftesbury Avenue in 1885 turned the plaza into a busy traffic junction. This made Piccadilly Circus attractive for advertisers, who installed London's first illuminated billboards here in 1895.

Carnaby Street Carnaby Street is a pedestrianised shopping street in the City of Westminster, London, located in the Soho district, near Oxford Street and Regent Street. It is home to numerous fashion and lifestyle retailers, including a large number of independent fashion boutiques. Streets crossing, or meeting with, Carnaby Street are, from south to north, Beak Street, Broadwick Street, Kingly Court, Ganton Street, Marlborough Court, Lowndes Court, Fouberts Place, Little Marlborough Street and Great Marlborough Street.

Polynesia The islands of the eastern Pacific are known as Polynesia, from the Greek for ‘many islands’. They lie across a vast stretch of ocean from Hawaii in the north, to New Zealand in the south and Easter Island in the east. The western Polynesian islands of Fiji and Tonga were settled approximately 3,000 years ago, whilst New Zealand was settled as recently as AD1200. In the past, Polynesians were skilled navigators and canoe builders, creating double-hulled vessels capable of travelling great distances. Their societies were hierarchical, with the highest ranking people tracing their descent directly from the gods.

Ancient Egypt Towards the end of the fourth millennium BC several independent city-states were unified to form a single state, marking the beginning of over 3,000 years of pharaonic civilisation in the Nile Valley. Fertile earth left behind after the yearly Nile flood provided the basis for Egypt’s agricultural prosperity, a key factor in the longevity of the civilisation. Impressive monuments were erected in the name of kings, from monumental temples for the gods to the pyramids marking the burials of rulers. The British Museum collection includes statuary and decorated architecture from throughout pharaonic history, often inscribed with hieroglyphs. Many other aspects of ancient Egyptian culture are represented: coffins and mummies of individuals, but also furniture, fine jewellery and other burial goods.

Private British Museum Tour Meet your expert tour guide at the British Museum for your private 2 hour tour Discover the Highlights of the British Museum during a 2 hour tour with one of our expert guides at a time that's convenient to you. The British Museum was founded in 1753 and today has approx six million objects from antiquity to today's i-pod from all around the world giving an insight into ancient cultures and civilisations. Aztecs (Mexica) During the twelfth century AD the Mexica were a small and obscure tribe searching for a new homeland. Eventually they settled in the Valley of Mexico and founded their capital, Tenochtitlan, in 1345. At the beginning of the sixteenth century it was one of the largest cities in the world. Warfare was extremely important for the Mexica people and led them to conquer most of modern-day central and southern Mexico. They controlled their huge empire through military strength, a long-distance trading network and the tribute which conquered peoples had to pay.

Painting of the Month He’s England’s patron saint, but little can be said with any certainty about Saint George. According to legend, Saint George was a Roman soldier who refused to recant his Christian faith, and who was subjected to brutal torture and death by the Emperor Diocletian. He was martyred in Nicomedia (in modern Turkey) and buried in Lydda (in modern Israel). Uccello depicts the scene for which Saint George is most associated - his battle with the dragon - a legend that became popular in the 13th century when recounted by Jacobus de Voragine.

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