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How to Make a Steampunk Corset

How to Make a Steampunk Corset

64 Things Every Geek Should Know - laptoplogic.com The term ‘geek’, once used to label a circus freak, has morphed in meaning over the years. What was once an unusual profession transferred into a word indicating social awkwardness. As time has gone on, the word has yet again morphed to indicate a new type of individual: someone who is obsessive over one (or more) particular subjects, whether it be science, photography, electronics, computers, media, or any other field. A geek is one who isn’t satisfied knowing only the surface facts, but instead has a visceral desire to learn everything possible about a particular subject. A techie geek is usually one who knows a little about everything, and is thus the person family and friends turn to whenever they have a question. 1. USB – Universal Serial Bus GPU – Graphics Processing Unit CPU – Central Processing Unit SATA – Serial ATA HTML – Hyper-text Markup Language HTTP – Hypertext Transfer Protocol FTP – File Transfer Protocol P2P – Person to Person data sharing 2. 3. Here’s what one looks like: 4.

Button Statement Rings It’s September and that means it’s time to add another statement piece to your collection…. obviously! I heart almost every piece Nicole Richie designs for House Of Harlow 1960, especially her oversized rings. As amazing as these rings are they’re also an easy DIY. My friend Jenni, from I Spy DIY, did a project a few months back where she transformed buttons into earrings. Buttons, buttons everywhere!! Materials: Buttons, Clippers, Glue, Rings With Flat Tops (available at the jewelry supply store) Use your clippers to remove the shank from the back of the button. Once you’ve made the back of the button flat, use an ample amount of glue to secure the ring to the back of the button. Here’s another hint: If you can’t find a flat ring base, Ring Pops are a fun alternative. Once the base has dried, glue on the button. I now thing I have enough new statement rings to get me through the month.

HowStuffWorks beltmaking 101 Finally–the long-awaited beltmaking tutorial! way I make my fabric-covered belts has been learned from a mix of trial-and-error and vintage manuals. The supplies are simple, and making a simple pass-through belt is quite easy. I have, however, included instructions for how to add a pronged buckle to a belt and add eyelets. I hope you enjoy, and as usual feel free to ask any questions in the comments! Supplies: 1″ wide stiff belting (available at JoAnns), 1/4 yard fabric at least 45″ wide, buckle for 1″ belt (see sources at the end), pattern paper, thread, scissors, ruler, pins. Begin by measuring your waist and adding 6″ to 8″ inches to the length (I tend to err on the side of more, especially for a belt using a pronged buckle). Cut the belting the length of your waist plus the extra. Using the paper pattern, cut one layer of your fabric. Fold the fabric around the belting, wrong sides out. Gently work the seam to the center of the belting width, and press seam open.

The Featured Creature : Showcasing Unique and Unusual Wildlife DIY Transparent Clutch Phil Oh spotted this elegant Charlotte Olympia Pandora clutch during Paris Fashion Week and we spotted a DIY. Prada, Chanel & Fendi seem to be seeing clearly too because let’s face it, nothing says “I ain’t got shit to hide” like a transparent clutch. You’ll start by drilling a hole at the top of the plastic box. Push the knob through the hole of the box and replace the washer and nut. Voila! (top image by Phil Oh for Vogue.com, rest of images by Honestly…WTF)

Realistic Lateral Thinking Puzzles Lateral Thinking Puzzles, unlike most puzzles, are inexact. In a sense, they are a hybrid between puzzles and storytelling. In each puzzle, some clues to a scenario are given, but the clues don't tell the full story. Your job is to fill in the details and complete the story. Obviously, there is usually more than one answer to any given puzzle, but, in general, only one solution is truly satisfying. You can try solving these puzzles on your own -- that's certainly a legitimate way to go about this -- but usually you can have more fun if you involve other people. Warning: For some reason, these puzzles have a tendency to be rather morbid. The scenarios given on this page are realistic, if unlikely.

people webs: pattern: chunky circle scarf i said to myself, i need a big chunky circular scarf to wear all the time.. and this is what came of it. i am putting this grey one in my etsy shop, and also, here is the pattern: ( this pattern is intended for personal use only, thank you! ) chunky circle scarf you will need: 2 skeins of worsted weight yarn (i used caron simply soft) using both strands at once throughout, otherwise you could use bulky weight yarn 10 mm crochet hook , or any large hook (i crochet quite loosely, so if you don't, a hook larger than the one i used will work better) large needle for weaving in ends stitches used: ch: chain sc: single crochet dc: double crochet dc4tog: double crochet 4 stitches together: yarn over once, insert the hook into the stitch, draw up 1 loop (3 loops on hook), yarn over, draw through 2 loops (2 loops remaining) to finish the dc7together, yarn over once, and draw through all 8 loops at once. gauge: 4 rows are a little over three inches tall, finished size: about 60 inches around, and 10 inches wide

Origami Envelope If you’d like to make these cute little “Flap Lock” Origami Envelopes–all you’ll need is a piece of square paper…any size. I used Christmas scrapbook paper. 1. Fold the paper in half to form a triangle. Make sure your edges are even. 2. 3. fold the right corner about 1/3 of the way to the left. 4. 5. 6. 6. 7. 8. 9. And there you have it! Now scurry off and make a million of these–or at least 24 if you’re using them for the Family Advent Countdown Calendar. Not in the mood to fold your own? DIY Fringe Scarf | Lakeland Local Everyone needs a go-to fringe scarf in their fashion repertoire. Here’s an easy way to make your own. What You Will Need: -Old T-Shirt -Good Scissors Step 1: Go through your old T-shirts and find a daring print or color combo. For a cleaner look, choose a solid. Step 2: Cut horizontally across the shirt, just below the armholes, to create a rectangular tube. Step 3: Working your way around the tube, make a series of vertical cuts that extend from the raw edge upward. Step 4: Tug down on each strand to elongate it. photo credit: Cathy Hayes for Lakeland Local

The Fantasy Fiction Formula "Rob Parnell is the World's Foremost Writing Guru" - Writers Digest Best Writers' Site - Critters #1 Best Writers' Info Site 2010 - 2011 Writers! Click here to get published free by Magellan Books. The Fantasy Fiction Formula Rob Parnell Now, most fantasy writers have been constructing their fictional world since childhood. I remember an interview with JK Rowling where she wandered her home town for the camera, recounting the points, places and people that influenced her Harry Potter world, right from when she was a kid. Similarly, JR Tolkein was an ardent lifelong scholar of "Middle Earth" languages way before he set pen to paper. But if you're new to the genre, where do you begin? Many professional fantasy writers will joke about 'the formula' for good fantasy because it does exist and good fantasy authors still use it - not because they're lazy but because the fans want it - in fact insist on it! It has been condensed thus: 'Hero, artifact, quest'. Get a very large sheet of paper.

Peter's guide to map creation: How to create fantasy maps Here is my take on creating maps for roleplaying games. Off course, you will be able to use the method for other purposes also, but why spend time doing anything, which isn't related to roleplaying:-)To see what a map done according to my advice might look like, here is one of the maps I did (180kB). Preparations Step 1.1 Determine how you want the world to look. Draw some loose sketches. Look in an Atlas, to find out how our world looks and copy whatever you find to be nice looking. Step 1.2 Determine the map scale. Step 1.3 Get access to a good drawing program. Step 1.4 Get access to a scanner. Startup Step 2.1 By now, you should have a rough sketch of the map in front of you. Step 2.2 This is very important! Step 2.3 Then, look at the map you drew. Step 2.4 Since mountains is the feature I have the greatest difficulty getting just right, I've made a page to describe how I do them. Step 2.5 Review the map. Step 2.6 Scan the map. Computer manipulation Note: This is very Photoshop specific.

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