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Getting Started in the Digital Humanities

Getting Started in the Digital Humanities

http://digitalscholarship.wordpress.com/2011/10/14/getting-started-in-the-digital-humanities/

» Getting Started in Digital Humanities Journal of Digital Humanities Lisa Spiro When I presented at the Great Lakes College Association’s New Directions workshop on digital humanities (DH) in October, I tried to answer the question “Why digital humanities?” But I discovered that an equally important question is “How do you do digital humanities?” Although participants seemed to be excited about the potential of digital humanities, some weren’t sure how to get started and where to go for support and training. Building on the slides I presented at the workshop, I’d like to offer some ideas for how a newcomer might get acquainted with the community and dive into digital humanities work. The CUNY Digital Humanities Resource Guide - CUNY Academic Commons From CUNY Academic Commons Welcome to the CUNY Digital Humanities Resource Guide, a collaboratively produced introduction to the field of Digital Humanities. The guide is a project of the CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative (DHI), a new working group aimed at building connections and community among those at CUNY who are – or would like to be – applying digital technologies to research and pedagogy in the humanities. Introduction Using This Guide The Digital Humanities

The Latest From Digital Humanities Questions and Answers – ProfHacker - Blogs Launched in September of 2010, Digital Humanities Questions & Answers is a joint venture of the Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) and ProfHacker. (See Julie Meloni’s launch announcement.) Digital Humanities Questions and Answers (@DHAnswers on Twitter) is designed to be a free resource where anyone with an interest in the digital humanities can pose a question to the community of folks working in the field. Since we last checked in with the site, many interesting threads have been launched and several “best answers” have been provided. Debates in the Digital Humanities Encompassing new technologies, research methods, and opportunities for collaborative scholarship and open-source peer review, as well as innovative ways of sharing knowledge and teaching, the digital humanities promises to transform the liberal arts—and perhaps the university itself. Indeed, at a time when many academic institutions are facing austerity budgets, digital humanities programs have been able to hire new faculty, establish new centers and initiatives, and attract multimillion-dollar grants. Clearly the digital humanities has reached a significant moment in its brief history. But what sort of moment is it? Debates in the Digital Humanities brings together leading figures in the field to explore its theories, methods, and practices and to clarify its multiple possibilities and tensions.

How did they make that? (Cross-posted on UCLA’s DH Bootcamp blog) Edit: Dot Porter made a Zotero collection for this post! Thanks, Dot! Many students tell me that in order to get started with digital humanities, they’d like to have some idea of what they might do and what technical skills they might need in order to do it. Here’s a set of digital humanities projects that might help you to get a handle on the kinds of tools and technologies available for you to use.

Wikipedia : Digital humanities The Digital Humanities are an area of research, teaching, and creation concerned with the intersection of computing and the disciplines of the humanities. Developing from the fields of humanities computing, humanistic computing,[2] and digital humanities praxis (dh praxis[3]) digital humanities embrace a variety of topics, from curating online collections to data mining large cultural data sets. Digital humanities (often abbreviated DH) currently incorporate both digitized and born-digital materials and combine the methodologies from traditional humanities disciplines (such as history, philosophy, linguistics, literature, art, archaeology, music, and cultural studies) and social sciences [4] with tools provided by computing (such as data visualisation, information retrieval, data mining, statistics, text mining) and digital publishing. Objectives[edit] A growing number of researchers in digital humanities are using computational methods for the analysis of large cultural data sets.

Open Book Publishers launches new Digital Humanities Series » aaDH: Australasian Association for Digital Humanities Open Book Publishers has launched a new Digital Humanities Series . The series is overseen by an international board of experts (including two members of the aa-DH inaugural executive committee) and its books subjected to rigorous peer review. Its objective is to encourage works that extend the boundaries of the field and help to strengthen its interrelations with the other disciplines of the arts, humanities and beyond. We are interested in experimental monographs, edited volumes and collections as well as introductory guides for non-specialists, best practices guides for practitioners and “state of the art” surveys.

Literacy in the Digital Humanities: Or, a clueless “noob” in digital academe Today my faculty group focused on the Digital Humanities here at Messiah College had a great session with Ryan Cordell from St. Norbert’s College. Ryan blogs regularly for ProfHacker at the Chronicle of Higher Education, and holds down the Digital Humanities fort (or perhaps leads the insurgency) at St. Norbert’s. Short Guide to the Digital_Humanities The Short Guide, a subsection of Digital_Humanities that my coauthors (Anne Burdick, Johanna Drucker, Peter Lunenfeld and Todd Presner) and I devised both for DH practitioners and for department chairs, deans, promotion committees, provosts and university presidents, is now being released, section by section and with a video preface, by the online edition of the Bard Graduate Center’s journal of decorative arts, design history and material culture W 86th. Though it refers back to the arguments of earlier chapters of our MIT Press book, the Short Guide also stands alone as an overview of the field. As digital methodologies, tools, and skills become central to work in the humanities, questions regarding fundamentals, project outcomes, assessment, and design have grown in importance. So the Short Guide sets out to provide a set of checklists and guidelines in concise and shareable form.

Brendan Griffen Graphs Of Wikipedia: Influential Thinkers The internet is big — very big. One such way to investigate all of this free online content is through graphs. The network visualisations by Simon Raper in his fantastic post about graphing the history of philosophy is one example of how to exploit such data. Let’s take this a step further and create a series of graphs using everyone on Wikipedia. Using subsets of this dataset (authors, actors, sports players etc.), we can investigate sub-networks within the larger dataset.

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