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Electro-Drops blog d'actualité musicale, dubstep, électro, house, mixtapes

Electro-Drops blog d'actualité musicale, dubstep, électro, house, mixtapes
Dodge & Fuski, fondateurs du label Disciple Recordings et artistes reconnus pleinement pour leurs prods relativement efficaces, ont sorti leur nouvel EP sur leur label le 27 janvier dernier, Stop What You’re Doing EP. C’est leur 1er EP en « auto-production », puisque leur dernier, Sucker Punch EP, fut produit par Never Say Die Records. Ils avaient d’ailleurs attaqué leur label par un EP de remixes, Dodge & Fuski Remixed. De retour donc avec Stop What You’re Doing EP les 2 compères nous livrent un 4 titres composé de 3 originaux et un remix : Stop What You’re Doing Ft JFB, The Clap, Bringing ... Lire la suite »

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Note names, MIDI numbers and frequencies Note names, MIDI numbers and frequencies are related here in tables and via an application that converts them. The musical interval between two notes depends on the ratio of their frequencies. See Frequency and Pitch for more details and an introduction to frequency and pitch. An octave is a ratio of 2:1 and, in equal temperament, an octave comprises 12 equal semitones. Each semitone therefore has a ratio of 21/12 (approximately 1.059). By convention, A4 is often set at 440 Hz.

Electronic Music Blog Loadstar recently released his Future Perfect Remixes EP and my favourite of the bunch is this huge dancefloor bomb from DC Breaks. ♫ Loadstar – Give It To Me (DC Breaks Remix) daftwho? MUST have Melodic Step Sequencing with Ableton Push Requirements: Latest version of Live 9 and Push firmware installed Ableton's Push has already revolutionized the hands-on process of composing electronic music with its innovative scaled note entry and drum programming modes. The true beauty of this hardware is that it's designed to continue evolving with future firmware and software updates to Live—and with their latest revision, they've added smooth, MIDI clip-integrated step sequencing. Let's explore. Get Set First things first, we'll need to create a MIDI track in Live or directly from Push.

Algorithmic symphonies from one line of code Lately, there has been a lot of experimentation with very short programs that synthesize something that sounds like music. I now want to share some information and thoughts about these experiments. First, some background. On 2011-09-26, I released the following video on Youtube, presenting seven programs and their musical output: This video gathered a lot of interest, inspiring many programmers to experiment on their own and share their findings. Recording Impulse Responses With growing computing power over the last decade, convolution plugins have become commonplace. Some of the most common ones include Audio Ease Altiverb, Logic’s Space Designer, Avid TL Space, Waves IR-1 and McDsp Revolver. They are usually packaged with large and useful libraries of impulse responses (more on what all this means below), but what makes them really powerful is the fact that it is quite easy to record and use your own impulse responses. This not only helps ‘personalise’ your mixes, but is extremely useful in post-production and in the design of new sounds. Each of the above mentioned plugins need slightly different techniques for creating a custom library of impulse responses. This article is a description of the general concepts behind recording good impulse responses and should be easily adaptable to any convolution/de-convolution tool.

Making waves – Open Music Labs’ DSP Shield – Arduino – freeRTOS There’s a great new Arduino Uno (pre-R3) Shield available from Open Music Labs. Their Audio Codec Shield is an Arduino shield that uses the Wolfson WM8731 codec. It is capable of sampling and reproducing audio up to 88kHz, 24bit stereo, but for use with the Arduino it is practically limited to 44kHz, 16bit stereo. The Audio Codec Shield has 1/8″ stereo input and headphone output jacks, a single pole analogue input aliasing filter, and 2 potentiometer for varying parameters in the program on the fly. The Open Music Labs provides a some libraries and code examples for use with the Arduino IDE, and also with the Maple IDE. Interfacing with a DAC (Digital/Analog Converter) for Sound Synthesis with the Netduino In previous two posts, I created a midi interface for the Netduino. For kicks, here's what it looks like soldered rather than on the breadboard (and beside it, a shot of the disaster my desk has become during this project. There's actually a Commodore 128 in the rubble to the right):

D-type Flip Flop Counter or Delay Flip-flop But in order to prevent this from happening an inverter can be connected between the “SET” and the “RESET” inputs to produce another type of flip flop circuit known as a Data Latch, Delay flip flop, D-type Bistable, D-type Flip Flop or just simply a D Flip Flop as it is more generally called. The D Flip Flop is by far the most important of the clocked flip-flops as it ensures that ensures that inputs S and R are never equal to one at the same time. The D-type flip flop are constructed from a gated SR flip-flop with an inverter added between the S and the R inputs to allow for a single D (data) input. Then this single data input, labelled D, is used in place of the “set” signal, and the inverter is used to generate the complementary “reset” input thereby making a level-sensitive D-type flip-flop from a level-sensitive RS-latch as now S = D and R = not D as shown. D-type Flip-Flop Circuit

Pitch Shifting Using The Fourier Transform With the increasing speed of todays desktop computer systems, a growing number of computationally intense tasks such as computing the Fourier transform of a sampled audio signal have become available to a broad base of users. Being a process traditionally implemented on dedicated DSP systems or rather powerful computers only available to a limited number of people, the Fourier transform can today be computed in real time on almost all average computer systems. Introducing the concept of frequency into our signal representation, this process appears to be well suited for the rather specialized application of changing the pitch of an audio signal while keeping its length constant, or changing its length while retaining its original pitch. This application is of considerable practical use in todays audio processing systems. One process that implements this has been briefly mentioned in our Time Stretching and Pitch Shifting introductory course, namely the “Phase Vocoder”.

Advanced Programming Techniques for Modular Synthesizers Table of Contents 1 Introduction 1.1 The Purpose of this Document 1.2 Acknowledgements

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