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Online Mind Mapping and Brainstorming - MindMeister Guide for Writers: Latin Phrases It’s a matter of taste and style, but not long ago American writers attempted to demonstrate their credentials to the world by including Latin and French phrases within works. A dash of Latin was expected of the moderately educated throughout the Western world. annus mirabilis - wonderful year arbiter elegantiae - judge of the elegant; one who knows the good things in life bona fides - good faith; credentials carpe diem - sieze the day; enjoy the present casus belli - cause justifying a war caveat emptor - buyer beware cui bono? caeteris paribus - all things being equal de facto - of fact; it is de gustibus non est disputandum - no disputing tastes; there is no accounting for taste Dei gratia - by the grace of God Deo gratias - thanks to God Deo volente - God willing dis aliter visum - it seemed otherwise to the gods Dominus vobiscum - Lord be with you dulce et decorum est pro patria mori - sweet and seemly it is to die for one’s country ecce homo - behold man ex cathedra - with authority

100 Awesome Open Courses for Bibliophiles | Online College Tips Book lovers and collectors don’t have to stop learning after they graduate college. There are loads of free courses to take online that will supply you with reading lists, information about the history of books and manuscripts, linguistics, foreign literature, ancient texts and more. Here are 100 awesome open courses for bibliophiles. Literature Take these courses to explore great writers, compare styles, and learn about the writing tradition. Introduction to Fiction: Compare narrative styles of Virginia Woolf, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens and Joseph Conrad. Foreign Literature Learn how different cultures produce different literary traditions, from China to Latin America and beyond. Spanish Poetry: This crash course in Spanish poetry is actually a video seminar. Linguistics Bibliophiles who are also interested in linguistics will enjoy learning about the style, expression and language of the books they read. Introduction to Linguistics: Understand the basics of human language. Ancient Texts

5 Free Online Encyclopedias Suitable For Kids To revise the information to the level of a child’s knowledge requires effort on the part of the teacher or the parent. So, right here, let’s introduce ourselves to five free online encyclopedias which have simplified explanations of deeper topics. The five online encyclopedias also help the parent or the teacher to free the kids to do their own browsing and research. Wouldn’t it be great if your kids could complete their homework without your handholding? Simple English Wikipedia Simple English Wikipedia defines “˜plastics’ in much simpler words. The online reference source is running around 64,555 articles right now in alphabetized categories. Use the search bar or drill down the Knowledge Groups to search for topics. Yahoo Kids A Yahoo search taps into the 52,000 entries and 84,000 cross linked references brought together by Columbia University Press. The most direct way to access the encyclopedia is to use the search bar. Fact Monster You can use the search bar or browse by subject.

Illustrations Of Unusual And Rarely Spoken Words Recumbentibus—A knockout punch, either verbal or physical. The Irish illustration duo of James and Michael Fizgarald, or also known as The Project Twins, have come up with a series of illustrations that visually represent rarely spoken and heard of words. In their series called ‘A-Z of Unusual Words’, the meaning of the words have been visually defined in the form of a whimsical poster—which can be purchased on their website. Here are some of their ‘informative’ posters: Acersecomic—A Person whose hair has never been cut. Harmartia—The character flaw or error of a tragic hero. Jettatura—The casting of an evil eye Pogonotrophy—The act of cultivating, or growing and grooming, a mustache, beard, sideburns or other facial hair. Ostentiferious—Bring omens or unnatural or supernatural manisfestations. Scripturient—Possessing a violent desire to write. Ultracrepidarian—A person who gives opinions and advice on matters outside of one’s knowledge. Yonderly—Mentally or emotionally distant; absent-minded

Khan Academy & New York Times 50 Most Challenging Words (defined and used) -... The New York Times recently published a list of 50 fancy words that most frequently stump their readership. They are able to measure this data thanks to a nifty in-page lookup mechanism, which you can try here. Try double-clicking the word “epicenter”. Since the NYT didn’t include definitions of these words, I decided to post a job to MediaPiston to produce an article defining and using each word in the list. The New York Times 50 Fancy Words (defined and used) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50.

Rankings - English - Graduate Schools - Education - US News and Ranked in 2013 | English Rankings Methodology Earning a master's degree or Ph.D. in English can improve your writing skills, sharpen your analytical abilities and broaden your literary knowledge. These are the top schools for a graduate degree in English. Unlock this Information Sign up for College Compass to get complete access to U.S.News rankings and school data. Get AccessNo Thanks Free Visual English Dictionary and Thesaurus | Discover meaning of words and associated words at SnappyWords.com

Riddles and answers What Runs Around the Yard What runs around the yard without moving? <p>A fence.</p> Has Teeth But Can’t Bite What has teeth but can’t bite? <p>A comb. A comb. Look In My Face Look in my face and I am someone, Look in my back I am no one. What am I? <p>A mirror. A mirror. Word Pronounced Incorrectly What 11-letter word does everyone pronounce incorrectly? <p>The word &#8220;incorrectly&#8221;. More Than a Few Nothing specific, but more than a few. <p>Bunch. Bunch. By Sef Daystrom Never Goes Airborne It never goes airborne, yet, still, it may land. <p>A punch. Not a Bird Though Feathered It’s not a bird, though feathered, and it has a mobile nest. <p>An arrow. An arrow. Slayer of Regrets Slayer of regrets old and new, sought by many, found by few. <p>Redemption. Redemption. Split Itself What can split itself before splitting something else? <p>Lightning. Lightning. A Blade of Jagged Cut Has a blade of jagged cut. <p>A key. A key.

25 Things You Should Know About Character Previous iterations of the “25 Things” series: 25 Things Every Writer Should Know 25 Things You Should Know About Storytelling And now… Here you’ll find the many things I believe — at this moment! 1. Without character, you have nothing. 2. A great character can be the line between narrative life and story death. 3. Don’t believe that all those other aspects are separate from the character. 4. The audience will do anything to spend time with a great character. 5. It is critical to know what a character wants from the start. 6. It doesn’t matter if we “like” your character, or in the parlance of junior high whether we even “like-like” your character. 7. It is critical to smack the audience in the crotchal region with an undeniable reason to give a fuck. 8. You must prove this thesis: “This character is worth the audience’s time.” 9. Don’t let the character be a dingleberry stuck to the ass of a toad as he floats downriver on a bumpy log. 10. 11. 12. 13. The law of threes. 15. 16. 17. 18.

The William Blake Page William Blake (b. Nov. 28, 1757, London--d. Aug. 12, 1827, London) was the first of the great English Romantic poets, as well as a painter and printer and one of the greatest engravers in English history. Largely self-taught, he began writing poetry when he was twelve and was apprenticed to a London engraver at the age of fourteen. A rebel all of his life, Blake was once arrested on a trumped up charge of sedition. Blake is frequently referred to as a mystic, but this is not really accurate. Most of Blake's paintings (such as "The Ancient of Days" above, the frontispiece to Europe: a Prophecy) are actually prints made from copper plates, which he etched in a method he claimed was revealed to him in a dream. As an artist Blake broke the ground that would later be cultivated by the Pre-Raphaelites.

I've been finding tons of places that work this way, so feel free to check them out! by archaea Jul 4

it looks pretty cool. i've yet to try it out, but i've been looking for new ways to get inspired. by jaemi Jun 30

Great for writers. It generates a word (You only get one word per day), and you get to write for 60 seconds. Awesome way to get your brain working! by lysara Jun 30

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