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Chocolate Caramel Tart Recipe

Katie and I have been pretty excited about our first post for the Holiday Recipe Exchange. After months of organizing – we are ready to launch the series today with our first sponsor – Scharffen Berger. If you’ve heard of Scharffen Berger, you know their name and brand is pretty much synonymous with high quality dark chocolate. Scharffen Berger Chocolate Maker is the first bean to bar artisan chocolate maker established in the United States within the past 50 years. With a full line of eating and home baking products, Scharffen Berger® chocolate is made from the world’s best cacao beans that are perfectly fermented and roasted, elevating your classic recipes with new depths of flavor. I came across this recipe for a Chocolate Caramel Tart months ago and knew immediately that this would be the recipe that I would be featuring for the Scharffen Berger Holiday Recipe Exchange. These tarts are not only decadent, rich and buttery, it’s knock-your-socks-off good! How To Participate Related:  Sweet

Mocha Scones Recipe I love making scones almost as much as I love eating scones. Up until I discovered my version of scone bliss at Panera a few years back, I always tuned my nose up to them thinking they were a slightly glorified biscuit. As much as I love me a good biscuit – scones are different and scones are delicious. My latest shipment from Green Mountain Coffee included a variety of K-Cup® portion packs from the The Donut House® Collection. My initial thought was to make cupcakes – go figure, right? The scones turned out beautifully – they were tender, moist and perfectly sweet. Whether you’re looking for a midday pick-me-up or a delicious accompaniment to your morning coffee, these scones are sure put a little pep in your step. NEW CODEUse the code AM0004-3568. If you enjoyed this recipe, you may like... Tagged as: Breakfast, Brunch.

The Best Chocolate Cake The Best Chocolate Cake is combines cocoa and coffee to create a chocolate lover’s dream. The rich buttercream frosting makes it perfect! We’re a family that loves to double down on chocolate. Peanut butter is a favorite, too, and my No Bake Cookies combine both with oatmeal. But since there was a birthday, I felt like I really needed cake. Deep, dark, chocolate cake. For birthdays, we have to do it up right by making my version of cake bliss. My family enjoys watching me flit from one thing to another like I’m their own personal reality show for entertainment. They love to point out when my missing spatula can be found at the computer desk, or my phone in the pantry, and helpfully letting me know that the oven timer has dinged at least 15 times. I also like to do things in excess – you know a little mound of frosting will never do in this household. I need to swirl on a pile of it on top, and then top it off with ganache just for the fun of it. Yield: 8 servings Prep Time: 25 minutes Notes:

Maple Cream Tart Sometimes things just work out for the best. Just as I was about to declare Thanksgiving ruined — my third corn syrup-less pecan pie tasted just as curdled and watery and messy as my first — I took a stab at yet another recipe, making a most-delectable discovery in the process: maple cream tart, a recipe Food52 adapted from NYC’s Left Bank. I am in awe of this tart’s texture. The absence of eggs makes it exceptionally light yet somehow it tastes as smooth and creamy as an untorched crème brûlée. For maple syrup lovers, nothing could be more delicious, and best of all, it’s a cinch to assemble. I know it’s very late in the game to start switching up dessert menus, but if you’re still looking for something to serve or perhaps to bring to a Thanksgiving feast, this one is just as festive as any of the classics. Maple Cream Tart Source: Food52 Note: While reading the comments section on Food52, I discovered that some people found the tart to be too sweet. 1. Maple Cream Filling: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Orange Chicken Revisited Here is another recipe I'm revisiting because the original photos are HORRIBLE, and this dish is worthy of being on my blog twice. QUESTION: Whenever you are in the process of making a dish, do you think about what you are going to write about on your blog for the same dish? I do. For instance, I wanted to mention that using cornstarch in place of flour makes the chicken pieces look too white while flour browns the chicken more. So, you should combine the two when coating the chicken. Anyway, I think the fact that I made this dish again tells you how good it is. I accompanied the orange chicken and rice with cold, green teasans the ice. This piece is about to go into my mouth. . .riiiiiight. . .NOW.Orange Chickenfrom Blog Chef Chicken- 2 lbs boneless skinless chicken breasts (cut into 1-1/2” cubes) (I used 1.25 lbs) 1/2 - 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 - 1 cup cornstarch1 egg (beaten) ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper Want a piece?

Chocolate & orange cheesecake I came home the other day super stressed (thanks work, I love you but sometimes you kill me!) and with an intense hankering for cheesecake. Unwilling to go out and buy a cheesecake I decided to make one knowing full well it wouldn't be done by the end of the day. I also knew the next day would be busy and so coming home to an almost finished cheesecake would be good. I've written before about the wonders of stress baking and my attitude hasn't changed. Sure, baking is sometimes really stressful in itself but it's enjoyable and distracting stress that results in tasty treats. This cake is crazy rich, as many cheesecakes are. The recipe is predominately from Tartelette with the super sweet chocolate topping coming from Gourmet Traveller. Chocolate & orange cheesecake adapted from Tartelette & Gourmet TravellerMakes one 26cm (10") cheesecake For the base 125g butter, very cold and cut into cubes40g sugar150g plain flour10g cocoa powder Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F).

Turnip & Apple Purée & A Jean-Georges Chocolate Tart Am I becoming too predictable? Are you sick of seeing vegetables puréed with apples? Do you think I should perhaps explore a cookbook other than this one and this one I hope not, because I’m really loving this latest variation on the vegetable-and-apple-cooked-in-milk-with-a-small-amount-of-starch technique. Similar to the cauliflower purée, the inclusion of an apple in this purée enhances the sweetness of the main vegetable — here turnips — and a small amount of starch — this time white rice — ensures a silky smooth purée, tasting as if it has lots of cream and butter, when it in fact has neither. Sally Schneider credits the technique to chef Michel Guerard and notes that celery root, carrots, rutabaga or beets — any watery or fibrous root vegetable really — could replace the turnips. While it’s delicious on its own — I ate nearly all of it at lunch — this purée becomes exceptionally tasty aside any sort of meat, where it can sop up all of the juices pooling around its base. . Serves 4

Snickers Cheesecake Recipe TGIF, friends. Hope that you all have had a lovely week, and that a relaxing weekend lies ahead. I’m looking forward to some friend’s-birthday-celebrating, farmers-marketing, coffee-(friends)-dating, cake-baking, church-enjoying, and sleeping-inning here in my little corner of the world this weekend. OH, and the thing I’m perhaps most excited about — choir-directing. Did I mention on here that I’m leading an Easter choir at my church?! I’m kind of over the moon about it. Anyway, warm wishes coming your way for a good weekend ahead. Read more Ever since my friends and I met for a tapas happy hour at our neighborhood Spanish restaurant a few weeks ago, I’ve had sangria on my mind. So of course, when I found myself in the fruit section at the market this week trying to decide what kind of sangria to make for our weekly neighbor night, I immediately thought of sangria. …oh good grief, why had I never thought of this before? Sangria with All The Colors. The only reasonable solution, of course. ;)

Soufflé de Fresas - Entrevista en Radio Cope Esta vez fué el Gran Chef el que me dió la receta perfecta para terminar una comida de una manera extraordinaria. Lo malo de los soufflés es que no son nada fotogénicos... pero y lo ricos que estan ¿qué? Si os fijáis en las fotos veréis como el soufflé se van deshinchando poquito a poco. Ingredientes: - 200 grms de fresas. - 2 cucharadas de azúcar. - 3 claras. - 1/4 cucharadita de extracto de vainilla. Preparación: Lavaremos las fresas y les quitaremos el pedúnculo. Con tan solo cuatro ingredientes podemos crear un postre extraordinario, lleno de sabor y además curioso, ya que es otra manera de tomar las fresas y además calientes, como ya lo hicimos con el crumble. Fresas, sigue siendo una palabra mágica en una estación del año resplandeciente, florida y donde el calor empieza a aflorar. Con esta receta voy a participar en el concurso que Pepekitchen organiza en su blog. También os dejo la entrevista de la Cope que se emitió la pasada semana, el 20 de Abril, en el programa "A cielo abierto".

Two Heart Tarts for Two Frog Commissary Strawberry Heart Tart Since purchasing my copy of The Frog Commissary Cookbook, a popular Philadelphia cookbook based on two legendary restaurants, I have been meaning to make its prized Strawberry Heart Tart for Valentine's Day. At the height of The Commissary's popularity, the restaurant allegedly sold 150 of these tarts daily and over 400 on Valentine's Day. Indeed, the tart's ingredients combine to make a truly perfect Valentine's Day dessert: a hidden semi-sweet chocolate lining very nicely complements a Grand Marnier cream cheese filling, and beautiful whole strawberries make a dramatic presentation in a flaky heart-shaped shell. (Truthfully, the whole strawberries are difficult to eat—I would just as soon cut them). Rhubarb Heart Tart with Vanilla Syrup If I had to pick between these two desserts on Valentine's Day, however, I'd chose the rhubarb heart tart. Each of these recipes yields enough for two heart tarts, and the pastry yields enough for six tarts.

stuffed mushrooms with blue cheese & sun-dried tomato pesto TGIF, friends. Hope that you all have had a lovely week, and that a relaxing weekend lies ahead. I’m looking forward to some friend’s-birthday-celebrating, farmers-marketing, coffee-(friends)-dating, cake-baking, church-enjoying, and sleeping-inning here in my little corner of the world this weekend. OH, and the thing I’m perhaps most excited about — choir-directing. Did I mention on here that I’m leading an Easter choir at my church?! I’m kind of over the moon about it. Anyway, warm wishes coming your way for a good weekend ahead. Read more Ever since my friends and I met for a tapas happy hour at our neighborhood Spanish restaurant a few weeks ago, I’ve had sangria on my mind. So of course, when I found myself in the fruit section at the market this week trying to decide what kind of sangria to make for our weekly neighbor night, I immediately thought of sangria. …oh good grief, why had I never thought of this before? Sangria with All The Colors. The only reasonable solution, of course. ;)

Peach Cream Tart Recipe : Paula Deen Directions Preheat the oven the 375 degrees F. To make the crust, place the flour, butter, and sour cream in food processor and pulse to combine. When the dough has formed a ball, pat with lightly floured hands into the bottom and sides of an ungreased 10-inch tart pan with a removable bottom and 1/2-inch sides, or a round au gratin dish. Bake for about 15 minutes, until the crust is set but not browned. Lower the oven temperature to 350 degrees F. To make the filling, if using fresh peaches, peel and thickly slice the peaches. Place the tart pan on a baking sheet and bake for about 1 hour, until the custard sets and is pale golden in color. Transfer the tart pan to a wire rack to cool. *Cook's Note: If using fresh peaches, sprinkle with a little lemon juice after slicing.

earl grey ice cream TGIF, friends. Hope that you all have had a lovely week, and that a relaxing weekend lies ahead. I’m looking forward to some friend’s-birthday-celebrating, farmers-marketing, coffee-(friends)-dating, cake-baking, church-enjoying, and sleeping-inning here in my little corner of the world this weekend. Did I mention on here that I’m leading an Easter choir at my church?! I’m kind of over the moon about it. Anyway, warm wishes coming your way for a good weekend ahead. Read more Ever since my friends and I met for a tapas happy hour at our neighborhood Spanish restaurant a few weeks ago, I’ve had sangria on my mind. So of course, when I found myself in the fruit section at the market this week trying to decide what kind of sangria to make for our weekly neighbor night, I immediately thought of sangria. …oh good grief, why had I never thought of this before? Sangria with All The Colors. The only reasonable solution, of course. ;) Read more Read more That recipe is coming on the blog tomorrow.

Baking the Bejeezes Out of Writer’s Block « Comfortably Domestic Let me take a moment to apologize profusely for being missing-in-action during the past few days. Life is just getting in the way. Gosh darn it, doesn’t Life know that blogging is my life?! You know, when I’m not being a wife-mother-chauffeur-maid-teacher-rambling-idiot-friend-coach-baker? Which brings me to the real reason that I’ve been MIA: I have a wicked case of writer’s block. The. I totally blame it on the Trenta. Naturally, I did the only reasonable thing when faced with a dilemma: I baked it out. So please accept my most sincerest apologies along with these lovely little tangy bites of buttery sunshine. Only five ingredients required: limes, flour, sugar, butter, and eggs. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees (F) and spray 24 cup mini-muffin pan with baking spray. (24 cups or wells, not 24-cups in capacity.) Start by zesting a couple of limes. Go ahead and juice the limes, while you are at it. Pour some sugar over a stick of softened butter. Dip a few fingers into some flour. Before.

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