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Rick752's EasyPrivacy for Adblock Plus

Rick752's EasyPrivacy for Adblock Plus

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Google's uProxy: A Peer-to-Peer Gateway to Internet Freedom In parts of the world where repressive governments control the Internet with unassailable firewalls, netizens don't see the same web that people in other countries can. Now, Google wants to give people in these countries a tool to circumvent those invisible barriers, and defeat censorship. Called uProxy, it is meant to be an easy-to-use, peer-to-peer gateway to the open Internet. With uProxy installed, somebody in Iran could use a friend's Internet to connect with him or her.

Onion Pi Pack w/Large Antenna - Make a Raspberry Pi Tor Proxy ID: 1406 - $94.95 Want something more compact? We suggest our compact Onion Pi model, it still has great range, but will take up less space! Feel like someone is snooping on you? Browse anonymously anywhere you go with the Onion Pi Tor proxy. Using this pack of parts and a free weekend you can build a project that uses a Raspberry Pi, a USB WiFi adapter and Ethernet cable to create a small, low-power and portable privacy Pi. After it's built, using it is easy-as-pie.

Why you should stay away from Unseen.is - joepie91's Ramblings It took a bit longer than I expected before I had the time to make this post, but here it finally is. Not too long ago, I ran across some Anonymous-related Twitter accounts promoting Unseen.is. Unseen is, in their own words, a "private and secure messaging, calling and e-mail application" - which seems great, but really isn't. As it turns out, there are plenty of reasons why you shouldn't ever use them. The mortal sin of cryptography.

How Google Dominates Us (book review, includes search theory) In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives by Steven Levy Simon and Schuster, 424 pp., $26.00 I’m Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59 by Douglas Edwards

What Is Deep Packet Inspection? It’s easy to turn a deaf ear to the controversy surrounding recent copyright protection bills like the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) or the PROTECT IP Act, which threatened to curtail free speech on the Internet by allowing the U.S. Department of Justice to blacklist and block access to websites suspected of copyright infringement. Most of us don’t visit websites suspected of illegally distributing copyrighted material, so blocking us from accessing them seems harmless. But should your ISP ever be legally obligated to prevent you from accessing restricted websites, it will have to find a way to monitor your online activity, and that could cause your privacy to be compromised if your ISP employs deep packet inspection tools to keep tabs on you. To understand how deep packet inspection works and the potential threat it poses to your privacy, you need to know that your PC packages all the information you send and receive online into packets of data.

Google Docs Why Google Docs? Google Apps is a tremendous platform for facilitating online collaboration in your classroom, or beyond. It is freely available on the Web and if you are familiar with other word processors, spreadsheets, and presentation programs, you can easily use Google Docs. The chat feature on presentations makes it possible to create a "permeable classroom" by bringing experts into a lesson to interact with students online. Here are some benefits of Google Docs: It is available from anywhere and anytime with an Internet connection. Access Any Website Or Forum Without Registering Visit any forum or website to find something useful and they will ask you to register. Every time a forum asks me to register, I simply close the site. You would probably do the same. But this time, lets face it.

Why and How iOS Apps Are Grabbing Your Data Early last week the personal diary app Path became the fulcrum of a massive discussion about how cavalier mobile apps are getting with harvesting your, presumably, personal information. Path was found by a developer to send the entire contents of its users Address Books, where, it was uncovered, it was being stored locally. Predictably, when privacy issues are concerned, there was an outcry about how Path handled the data, and many decried it for being underhanded or even flat out lying about its procedures.

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