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How to: create a Planting Calendar, Allsun style

How to: create a Planting Calendar, Allsun style
I must say that while I’m finding this market garden experiment very exciting, it’s also rather daunting. What are we planting today? What are we planting next week? Where are we going? Who am i and where are my pants? The solution to all this is Allsun Farm’s planting calendar system. Joyce Wilkie devised this garden card system firstly for her market garden at Allsun Farm, but happily she’s the kind of lady that likes to share. The Allsun Farm planting calendar system works in a simple but powerful way: Each month has a designated card. It’s disarmingly simple, and powerful too. Each month has three columns: Grow Seedlings (ie plant them into pots), Sow into Ground, and Pick. If you don’t know how to plant the crop in question, that bit of research should be done first. 12 months of planting and picking at Allsun Farm, all in your pocket September is busy! The other great thing about these cards is that they are portable, pocket-able and powerless. So what are you waiting for?

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