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Resources for Getting Started with Project-Based Learning

https://www.edutopia.org/project-based-learning-getting-started-resources

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8 Switches To Update Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century - 8 Switches To Update Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century by Thom Markham Here’s some simple math: 1.8 billion youth need to be educated for 21st Century life. And, given that 21st Century living increasingly demands sophisticated work skills, deep personal strengths such as curiosity, empathy, and flexibility, and the ability to think as well as absorb content, it better be good education. 3 Types Of Project-Based Learning Symbolize Its Evolution Project-Based Learning is an increasingly popular trend in the 21st century. The best evidence for this popularity might be the nuance it’s taken on. Project-Based Learning has gone from academic study that yields end-of-unit projects, to highly complex methods of creating and publishing student thinking. It is more closely associated with 21st century learning skills than perhaps any other form of learning, and new technology in the classroom is improving its potential exponentially.

Want Better Project-Based Learning? Use Social and Emotional Learning Today's guest blogger is Thom Markham, a psychologist, educator, and president of Global Redesigns, an international consulting organization focused on project-based learning, social-emotional learning, youth development, and 21st-century school design. An unfortunate legacy of the cognitive model that dominates education is the belief that everything important in life takes place from the neck up. This belief is the primary reason that many teachers struggle with project-based learning (PBL). At its best, PBL taps into intangibles that make learning effortless and engaging: Drive, passion, purpose, and peak performance. But peak performance doesn't start with a standardized curriculum.

How to Reinvent Project Based Learning to Be More Meaningful By Thom Markham This is a crucial time for education. Every system in every country is in the process of figuring out how to reboot education to teach skills, application, and attitude in addition to recall and understanding. Helping students be able to grapple with increased problem solving and inquiry, be better critical and creative thinkers, show greater independence and engagement, and exhibit skills as presenters and collaborators is the challenge of the moment. That’s why so many educators are using the project based learning (PBL) model. PBL has proven to be a means for setting up the kind of problem-solving challenges that engage students in deeper learning and critical inquiry.

Building Parent Support for Project-Based Learning When a teacher, school or district tells parents, "We're going to do project-based learning," the response may vary. You're lucky if some say, "Great news! Students need to be taught differently these days!" Using Entrepreneurship to Transform Student Work As my colleagues and I were building curriculum for our ninth grade project-based program, we found that most of our conversations centered not on potential projects themselves, but rather on building student self-motivation and self-mastery. We realized that our program's measure of success was whether the students learned to take charge of their own learning and find a joy in it. Beyond "Just Good Enough" I had made the switch from more traditional teaching to project-based learning partly because I saw how PBL greatly increased student engagement and curiosity. However, I still wanted my students to feel an authentic, self-starting kind of drive -- the sort of thing we see when kids are playing sports, making music, or doing anything that stems from personal passion -- in other words, the internal desire to continually improve and to work hard at doing it. I had a chance meeting with a friend of a friend who wanted to get students involved in entrepreneurship.

Learning by Doing: A Teacher Transitions Into PBL I have been a high school English teacher for 15 years. Every year, I try to do something a little different because I like learning from the process. After teaching AP Literature for a while, I became an AP Reader. Then, I presented at a national conference. I feel that I need to grow and develop every year.

Project Based Learning: Don’t Start with a Question Do you have to start project-based learning (PBL) with a question? (Oh, wait a second! Am I starting this post with a question?)

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