background preloader

Battleship Island - Japan's rotting metropolis

Battleship Island - Japan's rotting metropolis
These days the only things that land on Hashima Island are the shits of passing seagulls. An hour or so’s sail from the port of Nagasaki, the abandoned island silently crumbles. A former coal mining facility owned by Mitsubishi Motors, it was once the most densely populated place on earth, packing over 13,000 people into each square kilometre of its residential high-risers. It operated from 1887 until 1974, after which the coal industry fell into decline and the mines were shut for good. Today it is illegal to go anywhere near the place as it's beyond restoration and totally unsafe. The punishment for being caught visiting Hashima Island is 30 days in prison followed by immediate deportation. Bobbing into view, the grey seawall’s artificial angling of the island gives it the shape of a battleship – hence its Japanese name in popular mythology, "Gunkanjima" - Battleship Island. We explored the empty classrooms of the island’s huge school.

Abandoned Places: 10 Creepy, Beautiful Modern Ruins Abandoned Places: 10 Creepy, Beautiful Modern Ruins Abandoned Places | We humans are explorers by nature. The quest for discovery, both old and new, is part of what separates us from rest of the animal kingdom. Since the world we live in has been largely mapped and plotted, we urban adventurers turn our sights toward the relics of old and the ruins of the recent past. Abandoned Submarine Base, Ukraine In a bay on the northern shores of the Black Sea, the Soviet army maintained an elaborate submarine base throughout much of the Cold War. Abandoned Submarine Base Gallery The Ruins of Detroit by Marchand and Meffre In the United States, few cities have felt the burn of urban decay more than Detroit. Ruins of Detroit Gallery Beelitz Military Hospital, Berlin It is rare that a ruin like this should decay so gracefully and without the marks of vandalism. Beelitz Military Hospital Gallery City Hall Subway Station, NYC City Hall Subway Station Gallery Ryugyung Hotel, Pyongyang, North Korea

The house that time forgot: Hundreds of antiquities discovered in country mansion where little has changed in 100 years Auctioneers discovered a treasure trove of antiques inside The HermitageThey discovered wine from 1914 and Champagne from 1919Also discovered family photographs spanning almost 100 yearsContents of the house will be auctioned in 1,500 lots By Anthony Bond Published: 16:00 GMT, 5 June 2013 | Updated: 21:41 GMT, 5 June 2013 Thousands of people have driven past this mansion over the years and looked at its impressive exterior. But few could have imagined the secrets which the 18th Century building holds inside. The mansion, called The Hermitage, in Northumberland, has been described as the house 'that time forgot'. Antiques: Items untouched for almost 100 years were discovered amongst the 28 rooms in 18th Century mansion The Hermitage in Hexham, Northumberland Secrets: The cellars of the house included unopened Champagne bottles from 1919, some in their original tissue paper, and wine from 1914 Wine from 1914 was discovered along with Champagne from 1919.

Abandoned Amusement Park Amusement park is the generic term for a collection of rides and other entertainment attractions assembled for the purpose of entertaining a large group of people. An amusement park is more elaborate than a simple city park or playground, usually providing attractions meant to cater to adults, teenagers, and small children. A theme park is a type of amusement park which has been built around one or more themes, such as an American West theme, or Atlantis. Today, the terms amusement parks and theme parks are often used interchangeably. Most amusement parks have a fixed location, as compared to travelling funfairs and carnivals. These temporary types of amusement parks, are usually present for a few days or weeks per year, such as funfairs in the United Kingdom, and carnivals (temporarily set up in a vacant lot or parking lots) and fairs (temporarily operated in a fair ground) in the United States.

11 Abandoned American Hospitals and Asylums With some of the most disturbing and tragic histories of any buildings in the US, asylums and hospitals are way beyond creepy . Many of them were built in the late 1800s, when “mental illnesses” (such as masturbation, menopause, and teenage rebellion) were considered dangerous enough to lock someone in an asylum. A pain-inflicting misunderstanding of mental illness combined with a chronic mistreatment of its sufferers meant that many people were never released and spent the remainder of their lives in these horrible institutions. In addition to asylums, many sanatoriums were constructed around this time to care for the poor and very sick. After decades of overcrowding in both asylums and sanatoriums, the invention of antibiotics and behavioral drugs, and an evolving understanding of mental illness rendered these massive compounds obsolete. Although these spots may be spine-chillingly eerie and seem rife for exploration, be forewarned. 1. Image: Weylyn /Flickr Image: Motya83 /Flickr 2. 3.

Houses Gone Wild We think of feral dogs as dangerous, foreboding and to-be-avoid – but wild houses have a strange allure despite (or likely because) they are abandoned abodes, deserted homes gone from domestic spaces slowly back to nature. As photographer James D Griffioen muses, the Latin root refers both to while beasts but also to something that belongs to the dead, gone back to the Earth. Some of his shots capture this process at an incredibly late stage, such as the house above which is entirely camouflaged by the greenery that has grown to cover it – only discernible because the branches and vines conform to the shape of the structure. Others photos catch the domestic devolution at intermediate stages, snapshots of partial overgrowth where there is still some strange balance of building and nature – one could almost imagine someone still occupying this structure and simply never leaving it.

The Ruins of Detroit Posted Feb 07, 2011 Share This Gallery inShare850 Up and down Detroit’s streets, buildings stand abandoned and in ruin. From the photographers’ website: Ruins are the visible symbols and landmarks of our societies and their changes, small pieces of history in suspension. The state of ruin is essentially a temporary situation that happens at some point, the volatile result of change of era and the fall of empires. Photography appeared to us as a modest way to keep a little bit of this ephemeral state. William Livingstone House # Michigan Central Station # Atrium, Farwell Building # 18th floor dentist cabinet, David Broderick Tower # Bagley-Clifford Office of the National Bank of Detroit # Ballroom, American Hotel # Melted clock, Cass Technical High School # Old First Unitarian Church # Piano, Saint Albertus School # Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church, built in the Gothic revival style in 1911 # Classroom, St Margaret Mary School # Biology classroom, Wilbur Wright High School # Detroit?

Abandoned Six Flags Hurricane Katrina killed this clown. According to the photographer, “An abandoned Six Flags amusement park, someone spray painted ‘Six Flags 2012 coming soon’ on the wall above the downed head. But they were clownin.’ Welcome to Zombie Land kids! Chained dreams of fun at Six Flags New Orleans, abandoned Jazzland – that’s what Six Flags opened as “Jazzland” in 2000. Some photographers can see past the lifeless amusement park’s decay and desolation, showing us that there is still a chance the place could be cheery and not cheerless. Like a Bad Dream. Just in case you don’t know the scoop on what Hurricane Katrina did to New Orleans and Six Flags, this photo is of New Orleans, LA, on Sept. 14, 2005. Unlike the bleak amusement-less park above, some photographers can still see and share with us the echo of magic in the abandoned theme park Six Flags – even 6 years later in 2011. Once upon a time, Six Flags was filled with children’s laughter – but now it’s sad, silent, and surreal.

102 Year Old Abandoned Ship Grows A Forest In the notoriously polluted waters of Homebush Bay in Sydney, Australia, there is a Floating Forrest flourishing on an abandoned 102-year-old transport vessel. It looks like something out of a movie or some type of art installation, but what makes this juxtaposition of nature and industry so majestic is that the plant-life flourishing on this ancient ship came into being through natural causes. This amazing ship is the SS Ayrfield, a 1,140-tonne vessel built in 1911 as a steam collier that was later used in WWII as a transport ship. In 1972 the SS Ayrfield was brought to Homebush Bay to be dismantled. The largest objects in the area are infamous for their part in decades of chemical dumping and pollution.

The world without us: Chernobyl Nature has made a determined comeback In the 20 years since Chernobyl's reactor No. 4 turned a bustling Soviet city into a ghost town. The people are gone, and in their place are now thriving populations of deer, elk, wild boar, wolves, and even lynx. Trees are pushing up through Lenin Avenue and moss is clinging to the broken sidewalks and abandoned buildings throughout the 19-miles that make up the Exclusion Zone. Tim Mousseau of the University of South Carolina has been studying the effects of radiation on Chernobyl's wildlife, and told National Geographic that despite the higher levels of genetic abnormalities, "one of the great ironies of this particular tragedy is that many animals are doing considerably better than when the humans were there." Radiation levels are still too high for long term exposure, but the Ukraine has opened up the nearby city of Pripyat to daytrippers looking to catch a glimpse of what an urban center would look like after 20 years without a human footprint.

Chris Jordan - In Katrina's Wake This series, photographed in New Orleans in November and December of 2005, portrays the cost of Hurricane Katrina on a personal scale. Although the subjects are quite different from those in my earlier Intolerable Beauty series, this project is motivated by the same concerns about our runaway consumerism. There is evidence to suggest that Katrina was not an entirely natural event like an earthquake or tsunami. The hurricane's damage has been further amplified by other human causes, including failures of preparedness and response on many levels; existing poverty conditions; levee problems that were mired in political maneuverings; poor environmental and wetlands practices that left some areas more vulnerable; and the conspicuous absence of federal resources that were already being used in the Bush Administration's wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. ~ cj, New Orleans, December, 2005

The 33 Most Beautiful Abandoned Places In The World Many people doesn’t know, and didn’t even heard about these famous abandoned places. Many of these places are really something amazing, but they are also really sad when you take a closer look at them. On the folowing list, you can see abandoned planes, abandoned ships, as well as the abandoned houses, and so many other things, that are really amazing and magnificent. So, check out these amazing abandoned places photos. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 15th century monastery in the Black Forest in Germany 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 1984 Winter Olympics bobsleigh track in Sarajevo 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33.

Related: