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64 Things Every Geek Should Know « Caintech.co.uk

If you consider yourself a geek, or aspire to the honor of geekhood, here’s an essential checklist of must-have geek skills. The term ‘geek’, once used to label a circus freak, has morphed in meaning over the years. What was once an unusual profession transferred into a word indicating social awkwardness. As time has gone on, the word has yet again morphed to indicate a new type of individual: someone who is obsessive over one (or more) particular subjects, whether it be science, photography, electronics, computers, media, or any other field. A techie geek is usually one who knows a little about everything, and is thus the person family and friends turn to whenever they have a question. USB – Universal Serial BusGPU – Graphics Processing UnitCPU – Central Processing UnitSATA – Serial ATAHTML – Hyper-text Markup LanguageHTTP – Hypertext Transfer ProtocolFTP – File Transfer ProtocolP2P – Peer-to-peer sharing (See 2. 1. 3. Here’s what one looks like: 4. 5.

Tactile pixels let you 'feel' textures on touchscreen devices You could soon be able to ‘feel’ touchscreen displays, thanks to technology being developed in Sweden. Senseg’s E-Sense technology is designed to recreate the feeling of a wide variety of textures on touchscreen devices. It uses ‘tixels’ (tactile pixels) to generate an electric field several millimeters above a device’s surface. This enables finely-tuned sensations to be created on the your skin, replicating all sorts of textures – you don’t even need to actually touch the screen to feel them, either. It’s certainly sounds light years ahead of the haptic feedback used in many phones today, which merely vibrates to confirm that your touch of the screen has been accepted. Senseg says that its technology is inexpensive and easy for hardware manufacturers to implement.

15 Useful HTML5 Tutorials and Cheat Sheets | Tutorials 1911 shares 8 Must-have Cheat Sheets for Web Designers and Developers As a web designer or developer, it’s nearly impossible to remember multiple programming languages, frameworks, and keyboard shortcuts to various applications. This is where cheat sheets can be a life saver. Read More 2705 shares Photoshop CS6 Cheat Sheet Photoshop is one of the preferred tools of web designers, and like any other tool that is used over and over, it’s important to optimize one’s workflow by using keyboard shortcuts.

64 Things Every Geek Should Know - laptoplogic.com The term ‘geek’, once used to label a circus freak, has morphed in meaning over the years. What was once an unusual profession transferred into a word indicating social awkwardness. As time has gone on, the word has yet again morphed to indicate a new type of individual: someone who is obsessive over one (or more) particular subjects, whether it be science, photography, electronics, computers, media, or any other field. A geek is one who isn’t satisfied knowing only the surface facts, but instead has a visceral desire to learn everything possible about a particular subject. A techie geek is usually one who knows a little about everything, and is thus the person family and friends turn to whenever they have a question. 1. USB – Universal Serial Bus GPU – Graphics Processing Unit CPU – Central Processing Unit SATA – Serial ATA HTML – Hyper-text Markup Language HTTP – Hypertext Transfer Protocol FTP – File Transfer Protocol P2P – Person to Person data sharing 2. 3. Here’s what one looks like: 4.

Throwable Camera Creates 360-Degree Panoramic Images Are you, like so many others, tired of all those old-fashioned cameras you have to hold in order to take pictures? Well here's a camera you get to throw. The Throwable Panoramic Ball Camera is a foam-padded ball studded with 36 fixed-focus, 2-megapixel mobile phone camera modules capable of taking a 360-degree panoramic photo. You use the camera by throwing it directly in the air. SEE ALSO: The Development of the Camera: From Ancient to Instant [INFOGRAPHIC] The results — as seen in the video above — are pretty darn impressive, but the Ball Camera is definitely not meant for shaky hands. Right now, the Throwable Panoramic Ball Camera is not available to buy, though its creators have it pending a patent.

The Elephant in the Universe: Dark Energy – One Minute Astronomer In our brief look at dark matter, you found more than 80% of the matter in the universe is a type of particle or particles that emit no light, interact very weakly with matter in our everyday world, yet exert profound gravitational influence on the rotation of galaxies and the movement of galaxy clusters. Although particle physicists have a few good ideas, no one knows for sure what this dark matter might be, which is a little unsettling. But it gets even stranger because astronomers have since discovered most of the universe is made not of matter but a strange and unidentified type of energy– “dark energy”– that accelerates the expansion of the universe and may one day carry distant galaxies forever out of view. It all started with an attempt to weigh the universe. In the late 1980s and into the 1990s, two teams of astronomers, one led by Saul Perlmutter and another by Brian P. Type Ia supernovae have been observed for decades. A supernova in a galaxy far, far away.

Why Nikola Tesla was the greatest geek who ever lived Additional notes from the author: If you want to learn more about Tesla, I highly recommend reading Tesla: Man Out of Time Also, this Badass of the week by Ben Thompson is what originally inspired me to write a comic about Tesla. Ben's also got a book out which is packed full of awesome. There's an old movie from the 80s on Netflix Instant Queue right now about Tesla: The Secret of Nikola Tesla. It's corny and full of bad acting, but it paints a fairly accurate depiction of his life. The drunk history of Tesla is quite awesome, too.

Angela Zhang, 17, Wins $100K Science Prize for Cancer Research For her design of a cancer-fighting technique that targets tumors and leaves healthy tissue intact, Angela Zhang, of California, has won the grand prize in the Siemens Competition in Math Science and Technology, a $100,000 scholarship. She is all of 17 years old. Zhang, a senior at Monta Vista High School in Cupertino, took top individual honors for research that led to what she called a “Swiss army knife of cancer treatments” a gold-iron oxide nanoparticle that can precisely deliver chemotherapy to cancer tumors but not the surrounding healthy tissue, according to the Wall Street Journal and Mercury News. “She showed great creativity and initiative in designing a nanoparticle system that can be triggered to release drugs at the site of the tumor while also allowing for non-invasive imaging,” competition judge Tejal Desai, a professor at UC San Francisco, said in a statement. “This is a Cinderella moment for a science nerd like me,” Angela told the Mercury News. via Mercury News

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Help Desk Geek | Help Desk Tips for IT Pros Augmented Reality: Past, Present and Future - TNW Industry You may have heard about augmented reality before. If you haven’t, you’ll be hearing a lot about it from now on, with the smartphone and tablet revolution now in full-swing. Augmented reality (AR) is a term used to describe a live view of a physical, real-world environment that is augmented by computer-generated sensory input, such as sound or graphics. A typical AR environment has digital information transposed onto a real-world view. AR is not to be confused with virtual reality (VR), which is an entirely digital experience that mimics real-world situations. There have been countless notable examples lately of augmented reality in action. Just last month we wrote about Blippar, the augmented reality app that brings brands to life – both the iOS and Android apps are due out soon, but here’s a video of the app in action: That’s augmented reality in a nutshell. So without any further ado, here’s a look at augmented reality: past, present and future. Augmented reality: the past

CS402: Computer Communications and Networks | Saylor Academy Purpose of Course showclose The Internet has become one of the most important components of our life. We browse the Web, check e-mails, make VoIP phone calls, and have video conferences via computers. All of these applications are made possible by networking computers together, and this complex network of computers is usually referred to as the Internet. Unit 1 introduces you to an explanation of what computer networks are as well as to some basic terminology fundamental to understanding computer networks. The rest of the course implements a top-down approach to teach you the details about each layer and the relevant protocols used in computer networks. As you move through the course, take time to notice how the layers build on top of one another and work together to create the amazing tool of computer networks, which many of us depend upon daily. This course is designed to align with a Thomas Edison State College TECEP examination. Course Information showclose Learning Outcomes showclose

Don’t cross the LHC stream! There are a lot of questions in science that seem simple, but in fact lead to profound concepts. Why is the sky dark at night? Why does gravity pull me down? And some questions seem silly and frivolous, but it turns out are really hard to answer, and in fact scientists might disagree on the answer. So the folks at Sixty Symbols asked this of several scientists, and the first four minutes of this video are the result: Fantastic! It’s complicated! And there’s more. So taken in total, I’m not sure what would happen. Bang! But depositing all that energy all at once may not be possible; protons are so small they may not all hit you and suddenly stop. The point? So I propose that in a few decades, when funding is running low and the LHC’s primary objectives are met, we test this idea out. Tip o’ the lead shielding to AstroPixie. Related posts: - My excellent CERN adventure - Breaking: The LHC still will not destroy the Earth - Brian Cox calls ‘em like he sees ‘em - Cox on TED

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