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A Game of Thrones

A Game of Thrones
A Game of Thrones is the first novel in A Song of Ice and Fire, a series of high fantasy novels by American author George R. R. Martin. It was first published on 6 August 1996. Plot summary[edit] A Game of Thrones follows three principal storylines simultaneously. In the Seven Kingdoms[edit] Meanwhile, Lord Eddard travels to King's Landing, taking his daughters Sansa and Arya. At King's Landing, Eddard assumes the rule, while Robert gives his time to sensual pleasures and has little interest in governance. Thereafter Eddard learns, as the murdered Jon Arryn had learned before him, that Robert's legal heirs are Jaime Lannister's children by his sister. With Eddard imprisoned, Cersei and Jaime's eldest son, Joffrey, is crowned as Robert's heir and King of the Seven Kingdoms. As news of Eddard's arrest spreads across the Seven Kingdoms, a civil war erupts. On the Wall[edit] In the East[edit] Viewpoint characters[edit] Editions[edit] Adaptations[edit] Reception[edit] Awards and nominations[edit] Related:  Books and Literature

A Storm of Swords A Storm of Swords is the third of seven planned novels in A Song of Ice and Fire, a fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin. It was first published on 8 August 2000 in the United Kingdom,[1] with a United States edition following in November 2000. Its publication was preceded by a novella called Path of the Dragon, which collects some of the Daenerys Targaryen chapters from the novel into a single book. At the time of its publication, A Storm of Swords was the longest novel in the series. A Storm of Swords won the 2001 Locus Award,[2] the 2002 Geffen Award for Best Novel and was nominated for the 2001 Nebula Award for Best Novel.[2] It was the first novel in the series to be nominated for the Hugo Award, one of the two most prestigious awards in science fiction and fantasy publishing, although it lost to J. Plot summary[edit] In the Seven Kingdoms[edit] The North / The Riverlands[edit] Robb Stark's army reaches The Twins. The South / King's Landing[edit]

The Official Website for the HBO Series Game of Thrones | Season 2 It appears you are currently using Flash Player 11.2.202 and this site supports version 10 and up. In order to continue, please upgrade your Flash Player: Flash Player 10 - Get Latest In order to continue, please install the Flash Player. It appears you are currently using Firefox 17.0 which is not fully supported by this site. To optimize your viewing experience, please view HBO.com in one of the following browsers: It appears you are currently using Safari which is not fully supported by this site. Internet Explorer 7.0+ - Get LatestFirefox 4.0+ - Get LatestGoogle Chrome 10.0+ - Get LatestFirefox 4.0+ - Get LatestSafari 5.0+ - Get LatestGoogle Chrome 10.0+ - Get Latest

George R. R. Martin's Official Website Neil deGrasse Tyson Lists 8 (Free) Books Every Intelligent Person Should Read A Reddit.com user posed the question to Neil deGrasse Tyson: "Which books should be read by every single intelligent person on the planet?" Below, you will find the book list offered up by the astrophysicist, director of the Hayden Planetarium, and popularizer of science. Where possible, we have included links to free versions of the books, all taken from our Free Audio Books and Free eBooks collections. Or you can always download a professionally-narrated book for free from Audible.com. Details here. If you're looking for a more extensive list of essential works, don't miss The Harvard Classics, a 51 volume series that you can now download online. 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.) 6.) 7.) 8.) Tyson concludes by saying: "If you read all of the above works you will glean profound insight into most of what has driven the history of the western world." He has also added some more thoughts in the comments section below, saying: Thanks for this ongoing interest in my book suggestions. Related Content:

A Feast for Crows A Feast for Crows is the fourth of seven planned novels in the epic fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire by American author George R. R. Martin. The novel was first published on 17 October 2005 in the United Kingdom,[1] with a United States edition following on 8 November 2005.[2] In May 2005 Martin announced that the "sheer size" of his still-unfinished manuscript for A Feast for Crows had led him and his publishers to split the narrative into two books.[3] Rather than divide the text in half chronologically, Martin opted to instead split the material by character and location, resulting in "two novels taking place simultaneously" with different casts of characters.[3] A Feast for Crows was published months later, and the concurrent novel A Dance with Dragons was released on July 12, 2011.[4] Martin also noted that the A Song of Ice and Fire series would now likely total seven novels.[3] Plot summary[edit] In the Seven Kingdoms[edit] Prologue in Oldtown[edit] King's Landing[edit]

VST Planet Not A Blog Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing By Maria Popova In the winter of 2010, inspired by Elmore Leonard’s 10 rules of writing published in The New York Times nearly a decade earlier, The Guardian reached out to some of today’s most celebrated authors and asked them to each offer his or her commandments. After Zadie Smith’s 10 rules of writing, here come 8 from the one and only Neil Gaiman: WritePut one word after another. For more timeless wisdom on writing, see Kurt Vonnegut’s 8 rules for a great story, David Ogilvy’s 10 no-bullshit tips, Henry Miller’s 11 commandments, Jack Kerouac’s 30 beliefs and techniques, John Steinbeck’s 6 pointers, and Susan Sontag’s synthesized learnings. Image by Kimberly Butler

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