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German Coast guard trainee

German Coast guard trainee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yR0lWICH3rY

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15 English Phrases for the Doctor’s Office Phrases a doctor might say: “We’ll need to run some tests.” Tests are used to help diagnose (identify) the health problem. Some common tests are a blood test and a urine test. There are also scans such as an ultrasound (used for seeing internal organs; often used for pregnant women to see the baby) and X-rays (used for seeing the bones). Blood samples ready for testing Teacher resources - InThinking InThinking promotes and supports the development of high quality educational resources which incorporate cutting-edge ideas, encourage independent thinking, and help students to prepare effectively for exams. Subject Sites InThinking Subject Sites offer a comprehensive range of resources for new & experienced IBDP teachers. Each site - which is updated weekly - contains hundreds of ready-to-go classroom materials and masses of invaluable tips & advice on every aspect of teaching the course. Why InThinking Subject Sites? [Show][Hide]

Capital - The highs and lows of life abroad Away from the safety net of home, uncertainty is perhaps the one thing that unites all expats. HSBC's 2014 Expat Explorer survey revealed that 35% of those interviewed claim a lack of job security is their biggest worry, while a further 30% cite the state of the local economy as the main source of their anxieties. I also think living as an expat has slowed me down — in a good way. It's definitely made me a better listener. I don't judge people so much, and I'm starting to understand why China is the way it is. — Marc Martinez Sarrado

Nineteen Eighty-Four History and title[edit] A 1947 draft manuscript of the first page of Nineteen Eighty-Four, showing the editorial development. The Last Man in Europe was an early title for the novel but in a letter dated 22 October 1948 to his publisher Fredric Warburg, eight months before publication, Orwell wrote about hesitating between The Last Man in Europe and Nineteen Eighty-Four.[14] Warburg suggested changing the main title to a more commercial one.[15] Copyright status[edit]

R.I.P. California (1850-2016): What We’ll Lose And Learn From The World’s First Major Water Collapse Last week when NASA announced that California is on its death bed and has only 12 months of water left, the news hit like a punch to the gut. “Data from NASA satellites show that the total amount of water stored in the Sacramento and San Joaquin river basins — that is, all of the snow, river and reservoir water, water in soils and groundwater combined — was 34 million acre-feet below normal in 2014. That loss is nearly 1.5 times the capacity of Lake Mead, America’s largest reservoir,” writes Jay Famiglietti of NASA.

“We Finns just like it simple”: Net users can’t get enough of Helsinki Metro map Finland: land of the Moomins, Santa Claus Village, and exceedingly simple metro lines. A series of maps comparing the municipal subway layouts in major cities around the world has been tickling some net users who just can’t get enough of Helsinki’s metro design. Some are calling it proof that Finns like to keep things simple–and you’ve got to admit, when you see the image stacked up next to a map of Tokyo’s metro system, they may have a point!

Finland's Schools Are Overhauling The Way They Do Things. Here's How Finland’s education system, often held up as an exemplary model for the rest of the world, is on the verge of making some major changes. For years, Finland has led the pack in international test scores, becoming a source of fascination for education policymakers and experts. Now, the country is changing the way it teaches students. Going forward, Finnish schools will be placing less emphasis on individual subjects like math and history, and will instead focus on broader, more interdisciplinary topics. The goal, according to Finnish leaders, is to provide students with the necessary skills for a more technological, global society. Here are three things you need to know about Finland’s changing education system:

Finland schools: Subjects are out and ‘topics’ are in as country reforms its education system - Europe For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy. Only far eastern countries such as Singapore and China outperform the Nordic nation in the influential Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) rankings. Politicians and education experts from around the world – including the UK – have made pilgrimages to Helsinki in the hope of identifying and replicating the secret of its success. Which makes it all the more remarkable that Finland is about to embark on one of the most radical education reform programmes ever undertaken by a nation state – scrapping traditional “teaching by subject” in favour of “teaching by topic”.

Q: What makes Finnish teachers so special? A: It’s not brains When my niece was finishing school in Finland, more than anything else she wanted to become a primary teacher. Despite her genuine interest in teaching she failed to get into a teacher education programme at the University of Helsinki. She was smart and bright, yet she was not deemed qualified.

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