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25 Famous Thinkers and Their Inspiring Daily Rituals

25 Famous Thinkers and Their Inspiring Daily Rituals
Many find it interesting to glimpse inside the lives of famous thinkers in an effort to understand where such thought and intelligence is rooted. In that vein, here is a peek into the routines and rituals that writers, philosophers, and statesmen have depended on to keep their work on track and their thoughts flowing. Whether you need inspiration to make it through the next college semester of your bachelor’s degree, finishing up your master’s degree program, or are working on a future best-selling novel, explore these daily rituals you may want to incorporate into your life. CS Lewis. January 11th, 2010 written by Staff Writers Related:  Creativity

Harvard University Library: Open Collections Program: Home David Kelley on Designing Curious Employees Design thinking is a process of empathizing with the end user. Its principal guru is David Kelley, founder of IDEO and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (otherwise known as the d.school), who takes a similar approach to managing people. He believes leadership is a matter of empathizing with employees. Kermit Pattison: How has the design thinking model influenced your approach to leading people? David Kelley: The main tenet of design thinking is empathy for the people you're trying to design for. Empathy is not always talked about as a leadership quality. For me, it's all important. What happens when the leader has to crack the whip? I always found that if you handle a problem in a benevolent way and a transparent way and involve other people, so it's just not your personal opinion, that people get to the other side of these difficult conversations being more enthusiastic. A lot of this must depend on hiring the right people who have an internal desire to do well.

Nathan Myhrvold and collective genius in science Nathan Myhrvold met Jack Horner on the set of the “Jurassic Park” sequel in 1996. Horner is an eminent paleontologist, and was a consultant on the movie. Myhrvold was there because he really likes dinosaurs. Myhrvold is of Nordic extraction, and he looks every bit the bearded, fair-haired Viking—not so much the tall, ferocious kind who raped and pillaged as the impish, roly-poly kind who stayed home by the fjords trying to turn lead into gold. “What you do on a dinosaur expedition is you hike and look at the ground,” Myhrvold explains. Once, a team member came across a bone sticking out from the bottom of a recently eroded cliff. There was also Myhrvold’s own find: a line of vertebrae, as big as apples, just lying on the ground in front of him. People weren’t finding dinosaur bones, and they assumed that it was because they were rare. Myhrvold gave the skeleton to the Smithsonian. In 1874, Alexander Graham Bell spent the summer with his parents in Brantford, Ontario. Tegreene began.

publish a book? If you've never truly considered writing a book, take another look at the rubbish filling bookshelves at airport kiosks. The "authors" of that stuff are laughing all the way to the bank. While English majors and real literary types are screaming at each other in the stuffy halls of academia or the pages of The New Yorker, these clowns are quietly rehashing tired plots and making millions for it. You're a smart person, so we see no reason you shouldn't take a crack at making bank as well. (Heck, even if you're a ding-bat, we think you should give it a try. Here's how you too can tap into the wallets of all those gullible readers out there. 1. The first rule of getting a book published is to avoid writing a book. Agents -- what do they do, exactly? An agent is a separate individual who performs much of this filtering process. Agents, in turn, don't particularly like reading 300-page manuscripts either. But you say, "Wait.

How To Steal Like An Artist (And 9 Other Things Nobody Told Me) - Austin Kleon Wednesday, March 30th, 2011 Buy the book: Amazon | B&N | More… Here’s what a few folks have said about it: “Brilliant and real and true.” Read an excerpt below… Tags: steal like an artist

Ideas to accelerate agency innovation Me with Scott Prindle, Aaron Shapiro and Tony Signore I just came back from a great session at the Mirren New Business Conference. Laurie Coots, TBWA Chiat Day’s CMO, no stranger to change and innovation, moderated a panel with CP&B’s creative technology lead Scott Prindle, HUGE CEO Aaron Shapiro, Taylor CEO Tony Signore and me. We tried to cover everything from sources of inspiration to methods for transforming an organization. Here they are, recapped. The five ingredients for change No doubt many of you are familiar with Kotter’s 8-step change model. I can attest to that. Eventually we figured it out. Find a way to stay up on technology This has to be the biggest challenge for any agency moving from making ads to building digital platforms and experiences. Aaron Shapiro and HUGE do it by thinking and behaving more like a software company than an advertising or even digital agency. Conclusion? Photo credit: KellyFerrara

Nerd Paradise : How to Write a 20 Page Research Paper in Under a Day Posted on: 10 Cado 7:0 - 5.27.29 So you've procrastinated again. You told yourself you wouldn't do this 2 months ago when your professor assigned you this. But you procrastinated anyway. Shame on you. It's due in a few hours. Pick a Topic The more "legally-oriented" your topic is, the better. Make a list ...of every possible outcome that this issue could cause in...the near future...the far future...of every person that this topic affects....of any instances where this topic has come in the news....what you would do about this topic if you had the chance/power/enough-sugar...any little detail you can think ofThe important thing about this is to think of ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING, no matter how silly or far-fetched. Reorder everything Put your most obvious argument first. Then put weird off the wall stuff, regardless of importance. Put the strongest argument for your case next. Now list the incidents that will help argue for your point. It's best to keep all this in the form of an outline. Spaces

Kotter's 8-Step Change Model - Change Management Training from MindTools Implementing Change Powerfully and Successfully Learn how to implement change powerfully and successfully Change is the only constant. – Heraclitus, Greek philosopher What was true more than 2,000 years ago is just as true today. We live in a world where "business as usual" is change. Whether you're considering a small change to one or two processes, or a system wide change to an organization, it's common to feel uneasy and intimidated by the scale of the challenge. You know that the change needs to happen, but you don't really know how to go about delivering it. There are many theories about how to "do" change. Step 1: Create Urgency For change to happen, it helps if the whole company really wants it. This isn't simply a matter of showing people poor sales statistics or talking about increased competition. What you can do: Note: Kotter suggests that for change to be successful, 75 percent of a company's management needs to "buy into" the change. Step 2: Form a Powerful Coalition Key Points

Polaroid and Apple: Innovation Through Mental Invention Steve Jobs admits to few idols. But one is Edwin Land, the college dropout who invented the polarizing filters used in everything from car headlights to sunglasses. Land, of course, also invented the Polaroid Land Camera. It happened like this: One time when Land and his three-year-old daughter were in New Mexico, she asked why she couldn't immediately see a photograph that he had snapped. He took a short walk through the desert, pondering that question. Now, some 40 years later, Land had agreed to meet with Jobs at Land's laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Land once told a reporter, "If anything is worth doing, it's worth doing to excess ... Now the two visionaries were in the same room for the first time. "I could see what the Polaroid camera should be," Land remarked. Jobs watched. Later, when driving home, Jobs told Sculley, "It's like when I walk into a room and I want to talk about a product that hasn't been invented yet. Sculley drove on, stunned.

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