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Mesopotamia (Sumerians, first civilization on earth)

Babylon: A Wonder of the Ancient World Ancient Mesopotamia for Kids - Sumer, Babylon, Assyria The Persian Empire 1/5 (MUST WATCH) Lecture 2: Ancient Western Asia and the Civilization of Mesopotamia What is good in a man's sight is evil for a god, What is evil to a man's mind is good for his god. Who can comprehend the counsel of the gods in heaven? The plan of a god is deep waters, who can fathom of it? Before Civilization Between 9000 B.C. and the beginning of the Christian era, western civilization came into being in Egypt and in what historians call Ancient Western Asia (modern-day Cyprus, Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Jordan, Turkey, southwestern Russia, Iraq and Iran). Around 10,000 B.C., many hunter-gatherers living along the coastal plains of modern Syria and Israel and in the valleys and hills near the Zagros Mountains between Iran and Iraq began to develop special strategies that led to a transformation in the human community. Just why hunters and gatherers in this region of the ancient world turned to agriculture is difficult to say. Settlements began to encourage the growth of plants such as barley and lentils and the domestication of pigs, sheep and goats.

Infographic: Mesopotamia The history of Mesopotamia is measured in millennia rather than centuries. For 3000 years (beginning in 3500 b.c.), kingdoms rose and fell, empires expanded and contracted, outsiders conquered and were repelled. During that time, three dominant civilizations held center stage at various times. Download this free lesson sheet on Mesopotamia for kids detailing the Sumerians, the Babylonians, and the Assyrians – perfect for the classroom or home! The Kings: From Babylon to Baghdad 1 Ancient Babylon: Center of Mesopotamian Civilization According to legend, 6th-century Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar had a colossal maze of waterfalls and dense vegetation planted across his palace for a wife, who missed her lush homeland. Archaeologists still debate the garden's existence. CREDIT: Photo Credit: A 16th century depiction of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon (by Martin Heemskerck) Located about 60 miles (100 kilometers) south of Baghdad in modern-day Iraq, the ancient city of Babylon served for nearly two millennia as a center of Mesopotamian civilization. One of its early rulers, Hammurabi, created a harsh system of laws, while in later times the Babylonian language would be used across the Middle East as a way of communicating across borders. Another great accomplishment, if the ancient stories are true, is the construction of the Hanging Gardens, a wonder of the ancient world , which some believe was built by the biblical king Nebuchadnezzar II. “Babylon, in all its manifestations, is at once remote to us and all around us.

Lost Realms - Zecharia Sitchin - FREE MOVIE Mesopotamia Mesopotamia (from the Greek, meaning 'between two rivers’) was an ancient region in the eastern Mediterranean bounded in the northeast by the Zagros Mountains and in the southeast by the Arabian Plateau, corresponding to today’s Iraq, mostly, but also parts of modern-day Iran, Syria and Turkey. The 'two rivers' of the name referred to the Tigris and the Euphrates rivers and the land was known as 'Al-Jazirah '(the island) by the Arabs referencing what Egyptologist J.H. Breasted would later call the Fertile Crescent, where Mesopotamian civilization began. The Cradle of Civilization Unlike the more unified civilizations of Egypt or Greece, Mesopotamia was a collection of varied cultures whose only real bonds were their script, their gods, and their attitude toward women. Women enjoyed nearly equal rights and could own land, file for divorce, own their own businesses, and make contracts in trade Learning and Religion Jobs Buildings and Government The History of Mesopotamia

The Mysterious Ruins at Ani in Kars,Turkey Collapse: Mesopotamia Mesopotamia was known as the land between two rivers, the Tigris to the north and the Euphrates to the south. Rains were seasonal in this area, which meant that the land flooded in the winter and spring and water was scarce at other times. Farming in the region depended on irrigation from the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. In ancient times, many resources in Mesopotamia were scarce or absent, which stimulated trade within the region and beyond. Supported by lucrative trade with its neighbors, Mesopotamia grew to become a powerful empire. Mashkan-shapir was a typical Mesopotamian city, located about 20 miles from the Tigris River and connected to the river by a network of canals. Poisoned fields: A contributor to collapse Along with factors such as war and changes in the environment, scientists now believe irrigation techniques played an important role in Mashkan-shapir's collapse. In Mesopotamia, irrigation was essential for crop production. Could this happen today?

GOBEKLI TEPE DECIPHERED - ANCIENT ALIEN STAR MAP HUMAN ORIGINS DECIPHERED - GOBEKLI TEPE Mesopotamia, A History of. A Place For Civilization To Begin Mesopotamia Edited By: Robert Guisepi Mesopotamia is a region, not a country. Refer to the individual Peoples that made up Mesopotamia; the Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Chaldeans, and to some degree the Hittites, Phoenicians and Persians In the narrow sense, Mesopotamia is the area between the Euphrates and Tigris rivers, north or northwest of the bottleneck at Baghdad, in modern Iraq; it is Al-Jazirah ("The Island") of the Arabs. Questions as to what ancient Mesopotamian civilization did and did not accomplish, how it influenced its neighbors and successors, and what its legacy has transmitted are posed from the standpoint of 20th-century civilization and are in part colored by ethical overtones, so that the answers can only be relative. Mesopotamia and Education As a civilization contemporary with Egyptian civilization, Mesopotamia developed education quite similar to that of its counterpart with respect to its purpose and training. Back to Main menu World History Center

ANUNNAKi THE LOST BOOK OF ENKi ( NiBiRU War )

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