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Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms

Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms
Glossary Home | Text Version Designed to help learners at any level better understand genetic terms Guided by national science standards Explained by scientists at the NIH The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) created the Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms to help everyone understand the terms and concepts used in genetic research. In addition to definitions, specialists in the field of genetics share their descriptions of terms, and many terms include images, animation and links to related terms. Enter a search term or explore the list of terms by selecting a letter from the alphabet on the left and then select from the terms revealed. The Talking Glossary At the bottom of most pages in the Talking Glossary are links to help you get the most out of this glossary.

MendelWeb Homepage 97.1 Exhibits Collection -- Weather New Englanders have a saying: "If you don't like the weather, just wait a minute." Weather forecasts may be more stable in other parts of the world, but the basic idea stands. Weather is dynamic, the product of interacting forces we are only beginning to understand. Witness the weather extremes caused by El Niño in 1997 and 1998. Weather may change on a daily basis, but climate changes over geologic time. Join us as we explore the forces behind the weather.

Cracking the Code of Life Cracking the Code of Life PBS Airdate: April 17, 2001 ROBERT KRULWICH: When I look at this—and these are the three billion chemical letters, instructions for a human being—my eyes glaze over. But when scientist Eric Lander looks at this he sees stories. ERIC LANDER (Whitehead Institute/MIT): The genome is a storybook that's been edited for a couple billion years. ROBERT KRULWICH: This is the story of one of the greatest scientific adventures ever, and at the heart of it is a small, very powerful molecule, DNA. For the past ten years, scientists all over the world have been painstakingly trying to read the tiny instructions buried inside our DNA. J. FRANCIS COLLINS (National Human Genome Research Institute): This is the ultimate imaginable thing that one could do scientifically...is to go and look at our own instruction book and then try to figure out what it's telling us. ROBERT KRULWICH: And what it's telling us is so surprising and so strange and so unexpected. I'm Robert Krulwich. DR.

OLogy Antarctica is a continent surrounded by ocean. The Arctic is the opposite, an expanse of ocean surrounded by continents. Fireflies aren't flies at all. Genetic Updata Conferences | SamRhine.com Planets For Kids - Solar System Facts and Astronomy MYCN v-myc myelocytomatosis viral related oncogene, neuroblastoma derived (avian) [Homo sapiens] - Gene result Animals www.kidcyberteachers.com.au Need help planning classroom activities? Go here to the kidcyber resources for teachers website and find a collection of practical, low cost teaching materials in a variety of curriculum areas to help you 'put it all together'. Our units cost just a few dollars, making it possible for you to buy your own copy. We would like to continue to write for you but we need the few dollars for each copy to make a living and keep our site online. Many thanks Ron & Shirley The following are now available: A Storytelling Guide: Ideas and activities to get you started as a storyteller. Looking at Thailand: A cross-curriculum unit that guides students in years 3 - 6 to investigate aspects of Thai culture and society using inquiry learning. All kinds of bears: An inquiry learning based cross-curricula unit about bears for Years K - 6. Fonix is Phun! And in preparation: Looking at Vietnam; Looking at Indonesia.

Exploring Genomics Data The Genomics Explorers provide an iterative way for students to choose strategies for asking and addressing biologically interesting questions using a range of genomics tools. Select which Explorer you wish to explore: The Genomics Explorer helps students: become inspired about biology develop a literature-based understanding of important quantitative approaches, define interesting questions that can be addressed with data, make connections between genes and their biological functions, analyze and critically evaluate bioinformatic data, connect bioinformatic analyses with wet lab and field experiments, develop and test a viable hypothesis by bringing together the literature, classroom knowledge, and analysis of data. Supported by National Science Foundation grants DEB 0746571 and DUE 0837375, Teagle Foundation Fresh Thinking Grant, Vassar College, and Cofactor Genomics .

The Energy Story - Introduction Energy is one of the most fundamental parts of our universe. We use energy to do work. Energy lights our cities. Energy powers our vehicles, trains, planes and rockets. Energy warms our homes, cooks our food, plays our music, gives us pictures on television. Energy powers machinery in factories and tractors on a farm. Energy from the sun gives us light during the day. Everything we do is connected to energy in one form or another. Energy is defined as: "the ability to do work." When we eat, our bodies transform the energy stored in the food into energy to do work. Cars, planes, light bulbs, boats and machinery also transform energy into work. Work means moving something, lifting something, warming something, lighting something. There are many sources of energy. The forms of energy we will look at include: Electricity We will also look at turbines and generators, at what electricity is, how energy is sent to users, and how we can decrease or conserve the energy we use.

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