background preloader

The Coretta Scott King Book Awards

The Coretta Scott King Book Awards
The Coretta Scott King Book Awards are given annually to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values. The award commemorates the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and honors his wife, Mrs. Coretta Scott King, for her courage and determination to continue the work for peace and world brotherhood. NEW CSK BLOG: Follow the latest news and information from CSK on the brand new CSK Blog! To learn more, visit www.olos.ala.org/csk. Look back at our 50th anniversary of the Coretta Scott King Book Awards from 2019. Volunteer for a CSK Committee Once you've joined EMIERT and the CSK Book Awards Community, reach out to us to learn more about how you can volunteer for one of our Standing Committees, including: 2020 Author Winner The 2020 Coretta Scott King Book Awards Author Winner is Jerry Craft, author of "New Kid". 2020 Illustrator Winner Mildred D.

http://www.ala.org/rt/emiert/cskbookawards

Related:  Week 7: Toolkit: Inclusive collections and diversity audits

2020 Diverse Summer Reading List Let’s kick off summer with our engaging, printable Diverse Summer Reading List that will get all kids engaged in reading! Our list includes both fiction and nonfiction, bilingual Spanish/English titles, and a diverse range of cultures—in other words, the right book for every reader! You can find the full Summer Reading collection here. Want to freshen up your Summer Reading list, but not sure where to begin? Keep reading for some of our favorite pairings of popular books with our Lee & Low picks! Grades PreK-2 Lee and Low: Checklist: 8 Steps to Creating a Diverse Book Collection It’s not easy to create an inclusive book collection. Whether you’re a librarian creating a collection for an entire community, a teacher creating a collection for your classroom, or a parent creating a collection for your children, choosing books that reflect the diversity of human experience can be a challenging job. That’s because creating a diverse book collection is about more than just making sure X, Y, and Z are represented. It’s not a matter of ticking off check boxes or making sure quotas are filled. For those committed to doing it right, building a diverse book collection requires contemplation, research, and awareness. But the rewards are great: a truly diverse collection of books can turn children into lifelong readers and promote empathy, understanding, and self-confidence.

Moving Multicultural Collections Online In the age of COVID-19, how can library workers help students and patrons access diverse collections? In a June 26 session at ALA Virtual, two panelists discussed the challenges and strategies of doing just that. As part of the Ethnic and Multicultural Information Exchange Round Table (EMIERT) Chair’s Program, the session, “Promoting Multicultural Library Services in Virtual Spaces,” was moderated by EMIERT Vice Chair Andrea Jamison, librarian and lecturer at Valparaiso (Ind.) University.

Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) The list of awards below was originally published in Children and Libraries (Vol. 13, no. 3/Fall 2015). The issue's theme was diversity. The list contains a sampling of book awards and recommended reading lists that highlight high-quality literature for young people about diverse peoples and triumphs of the human spirit. American Library Association (ALA) Introducing Own Voices as an appeal term in NoveList October 22, 2018 Big news, folks! Own voices is now a searchable appeal term in NoveList. What is Own voices? The term originated as a hashtag created by YA author/disability activist Corinne Duyvis in September 2015. Diversifying Reading Lists Promoting diversity in literature is one of the core building blocks of the librarian profession. It is second nature for most of us to seek out books that feature characters from other countries, races, religions, backgrounds, and identities. But teachers often don’t have autonomy in choosing which books to include in their curriculums.

Module 24a: Transforming Library Collections Part 1 – Project READY: Reimagining Equity & Access for Diverse Youth After working through this module, you will be able to: Explain to your faculty, staff, administrators, and parents/caregivers the value of diverse and reflective literature.Evaluate your library’s collection through a racial equity lens.Collaboratively develop a plan to improve your library’s collection to better serve BIYOC. Introduction

A Great Big List of MG and YA Collection Development Resources When I give presentations on doing Collection Diversity Audits, I get asked a lot about how I determine whether or not a book is counted as diverse. The process is always changing for me as I learn more and grow, and at this point I focus on Own Voices. The truth is, the answer to this question is that I continually engage in listening, learning, reading and growing. The work is never done and it must be intentional. I keep and continually add to an ongoing list of resources that help me do this work. Beyond the Collection Diversity Audit: Inclusion is More Than a Book, Why we should be auditing all of our library services for inclusion and best practices When I first began doing collection diversity audits, I had no idea that was what they were called. It was actually SLJ editor Kathy Ishizuka who gave me a name for what I was doing. I had Tweeted out pictures of me trying to figure out how inclusive my collection was and she said, “Oh, you’re doing a diversity audit”. And I thought, “Yes! That’s what I’m doing.”

How Labeling Books as “Diverse” Reinforces White Supremacy In this guest post, librarian Alexandria Brown discusses the issues with labeling books as “diverse” and other ways we can build and promote a more equitable library collection. Every so often, the question of whether or not to add a spine label designating “diverse” books makes the rounds. Many condemn the practice, but lots of library staff persist in labeling. Like most diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) issues in librarianship, many of my colleagues are still operating within a white (and cisgender and heterosexual) supremacist framework. It is an understandable predicament to be in – after all, many library degree programs are not as strong as they could be in advocating for DEI and decolonization.

Tips for Teachers: Developing Instructional Materials about American Indians Editors Note: This post was created as a one-page document that would fit into a single page. It is also available as a pdf. If you have trouble opening or downloading the pdf, write to us directly (see the "Contact" tab for Debbie's email address). Does My Collection Reflect My Community? Diversity in the School Library Shannon McClintock: Welcome, everybody, to our Future Ready Librarian Webinar. I’m so excited for our April webinar. And as you know, my name is Shannon McClintock Miller. I am the district teacher librarian at Van Meter Community School in Iowa and the Future Ready Librarians Spokesperson. Also, you can find me on my blog at The Library Voice and on Twitter and Instagram @shannonmmiller.

Related: