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Personality Disorders: MedlinePlus

Personality Disorders: MedlinePlus
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Personality disorders Symptoms Types of personality disorders are grouped into three clusters, based on similar characteristics and symptoms. Many people with one personality disorder also have signs and symptoms of at least one additional personality disorder. Cluster A personality disorders Cluster A personality disorders are characterized by odd, eccentric thinking or behavior. Paranoid personality disorder Pervasive distrust and suspicion of others and their motives Unjustified belief that others are trying to harm or deceive you Unjustified suspicion of the loyalty or trustworthiness of others Hesitant to confide in others due to unreasonable fear that others will use the information against you Perception of innocent remarks or nonthreatening situations as personal insults or attacks Angry or hostile reaction to perceived slights or insults Tendency to hold grudges Unjustified, recurrent suspicion that spouse or sexual partner is unfaithful Schizoid personality disorder Schizotypal personality disorder Jan. 31, 2014

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) | AllPsych Psychiatric Diagnoses are categorized by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th. Edition. Better known as the DSM-IV, the manual is published by the American Psychiatric Association and covers all mental health disorders for both children and adults. It also lists known causes of these disorders, statistics in terms of gender, age at onset, and prognosis as well as some research concerning the optimal treatment approaches. Mental Health Professionals use this manual when working with patients in order to better understand their illness and potential treatment and to help 3rd party payers (e.g., insurance) understand the needs of the patient. The book is typically considered the ‘bible’ for any professional who makes psychiatric diagnoses in the United States and many other countries. The DSM IV is published by the American Psychiatric Association. Axis I: Clinical Syndromes Axis II: Developmental Disorders and Personality Disorders Axis III: Physical Conditions

DSM-5: The Ten Personality Disorders: Cluster B - Personality Disorders Simone Hoermann, Ph.D., Corinne E. Zupanick, Psy.D. & Mark Dombeck, Ph.D. Cluster B is called the dramatic, emotional, and erratic cluster. It includes Borderline Personality Disorder, Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Histrionic Personality Disorder, and Antisocial Personality Disorder. Disorders in this cluster share problems with impulse control and emotional regulation. The Antisocial Personality Disorder* is characterized by a pervasive pattern of disregard for the rights of other people that often manifests as hostility and/or aggression. In addition to reckless disregard for others, they often place themselves in dangerous or risky situations. Persons with Histrionic Personality Disorder* are characterized by a pattern of excessive emotionality and attention seeking. People with Histrionic Personality Disorder can appear flighty and fickle. Status is very important to people with Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

Paranoid Personality Disorder Symptoms People with paranoid personality disorder are generally characterized by having a long-standing pattern of pervasive distrust and suspiciousness of others. A person with paranoid personality disorder will nearly always believe that other people’s motives are suspect or even malevolent. Individuals with this disorder assume that other people will exploit, harm, or deceive them, even if no evidence exists to support this expectation. While it is fairly normal for everyone to have some degree of paranoia about certain situations in their lives (such as worry about an impending set of layoffs at work), people with paranoid personality disorder take this to an extreme — it pervades virtually every professional and personal relationship they have. Individuals with Paranoid Personality Disorder are generally difficult to get along with and often have problems with close relationships. Symptoms of Paranoid Personality Disorder How is Paranoid Personality Disorder Diagnosed?

Somatic Symptom Disorder 1. Introduction In the chapter we present our model of treatment for somatic symptom disorder. We begin with a brief history of somatic symptom disorder followed by a discussion of theory and research on it. Finally, we describe our psychosocial treatment for somatic symptom disorder and related disorders, which employs methods from both cognitive behavioral therapy and experiential emotion-focused therapy. Physical symptoms with uncertain medical explanations are some of the most common presentations in primary care. Medicine has long recognized a group of patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) and excessive health concerns. It was not until 1980 and the publication of DSM-III that the terms somatization and somatoform were introduced for physical symptoms that were medically unexplained [4]. Both DSM-III-R [5] and DSM-IV [6] used similar diagnostic labels and criteria to those used in DSM-III for presentations predominated by MUPS. Table 1. 2. 3. 4. 4.1. 4.2. 5.

Somatoform Disorders: Symptoms, Types, and Treatment Types and Symptoms of Somatoform Disorders continued... Conversion disorder. This condition strikes when people have neurological symptoms that can't be traced back to a medical cause. For example, patients may have symptoms such as: paralysis blindness hearing loss loss of sensation or numbness Stress usually makes symptoms of conversion disorder worse. Pain disorder. For example, they develop an unexplained, chronic headache after a stressful life event. Pain is the focus of the disorder. People with pain disorder frequently seek medical care. Somatoform disorder not otherwise specified. Conditions that fall into this category include pseudocyesis. Treatment of Somatoform Disorders Patients who experience unexplained physical symptoms often cling to the belief that their symptoms have an underlying physical cause, despite evidence to the contrary. A strong doctor-patient relationship is a key to getting help with somatoform disorders.

Schizophrenia What is schizophrenia? Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling brain disorder that has affected people throughout history. About 1 percent of Americans have this illness.1 People with the disorder may hear voices other people don't hear. They may believe other people are reading their minds, controlling their thoughts, or plotting to harm them. People with schizophrenia may not make sense when they talk. Families and society are affected by schizophrenia too. Treatment helps relieve many symptoms of schizophrenia, but most people who have the disorder cope with symptoms throughout their lives. What are the symptoms of schizophrenia? The symptoms of schizophrenia fall into three broad categories: positive symptoms, negative symptoms, and cognitive symptoms. Positive symptoms Positive symptoms are psychotic behaviors not seen in healthy people. Hallucinations are things a person sees, hears, smells, or feels that no one else can see, hear, smell, or feel. Negative symptoms Citations

NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness | NAMI: The National Alliance on Mental Illness While an exact cause of schizophrenia is still unknown, researchers do know that the brains of people living with schizophrenia are different from those undiagnosed with the illness. It is too early to classify schizophrenia as either a neurodevelopmental (impairment of the growth and development of the brain) or a neurodegenerative (progressive loss of structure or function of neurons) disorder, as both seem to occur over the course of the illness. Research strongly suggests the emergence of schizophrenia is a result of both genetic and environmental factors. Genetics Unlike other genetic conditions such as Huntington's or cystic fibrosis, it is believed that no one single gene causes the disease by itself but rather that several genes are associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia. While schizophrenia occurs in one percent of the general population, having a history of family psychosis greatly increases the risk. Environment Genetics, however, are not the whole story.

Psych Central: Schizophrenia Treatment By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Table of Contents Introduction Schizophrenia usually first appears in a person during their late teens or throughout their twenties. Successful treatment of schizophrenia, therefore, depends upon a life-long regimen of both drug and psychosocial, support therapies. With such support, determination, and understanding, someone who has schizophrenia can learn to cope and live with it for their entire life. Psychotherapy Psychotherapy is not the treatment of choice for someone with schizophrenia. People with schizophrenia often have a difficult time performing ordinary life skills such as cooking and personal grooming as well as communicating with others in the family and at work. Group therapy, combined with drugs, produces somewhat better results than drug treatment alone, particularly with schizophrenic outpatients. Family therapy can significantly decrease relapse rates for the schizophrenic family member. Medications Coping Guidelines For The Family Self-Help

DSM-IV Criteria for Schizophrenia Home DNA Learning Center Preparing students and families to thrive in the gene age Website Search DSM-IV Criteria for Schizophrenia Description: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia and associated disorders. Transcript: DSM-IV-TR: Diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia: A. Keywords: dsm, schizophrenia, schizoaffective, diagnosis, diagnostic, delusions, hallucinations, paranoid, paranoia, disorganize, catatonic, catatonia, undifferentiated, residual, schizophreniform, delusional, delusion, psychosis, psychotic This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Related content: 818. Professor Daniel Weinberger explains that schizophrenia has been called 'the cancer of mental illness' because of the severity of its impact. 2361. 2356. 814. 1257. 1255. 893. 1058. Kay Jamison discusses the experience of mania. 15372. 820.

Schizophrenia, the Cancer of Mental Illness Home DNA Learning Center Preparing students and families to thrive in the gene age Website Search Schizophrenia, the Cancer of Mental Illness Description: Professor Daniel Weinberger explains that schizophrenia has been called 'the cancer of mental illness' because of the severity of its impact. Transcript: Schizophrenia is often referred to as the cancer of mental illness because it is a tremendously disabling and severe condition. Keywords: schizophrenia, symptoms of schizophrenia, mental illness, cancer, schizophrenic patients, disorganized, catatonia, delusions, hallucinations, emotions, daniel weinberger Downloads: Windows Media Video MPEG 4 Video Theora Video This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Related content: 2226. An overview of schizophrenia-related content on Genes to Cognition Online. 1257. 893. 1255. 817. 1291. 1362. 820. 814. 1120. Dr.

Schizophrenia Home DNA Learning Center Preparing students and families to thrive in the gene age Website Search Schizophrenia Description: An overview of schizophrenia-related content on Genes to Cognition Online. Transcript: Symptoms of schizophrenia are divided into positive and negative categories. Keywords: schizophrenia, overview, review, genetic, disorder, gene, biochemical, cell, brain, cognition, behavior, environment, schizophrenic, symptoms This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Related content: 2223. An overview of bipolar disorder-related content on Genes to Cognition Online. An overview of ADHD-related content on Genes to Cognition Online. 2251. An overview of thinking-related content on Genes to Cognition Online. 2225. An overview of depression-related content on Genes to Cognition Online. 2239. An overview of language-related content on Genes to Cognition Online. 2233. 1291. 817. 1975.

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