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The Backpack

The Backpack
Hi! I'm Tiffany from Tiny Seamstress Designs! I'm so excited to be sharing my ideas here with you on the Moda Bake Shop. This is a great backpack for all of your grade school children and can be altered to fit younger children as well. I used the Lily and Will collection by Bunny Hill Designs to make this backpack, they have color ways for boys and girls...so fun! 1 1/2 yard fabric for body1 1/2 yard fabric for lining2 fat quarters for ties (they do not have to be the same print)fusible fleece 2 Magnetic snaps Using body (outside) fabric cut: (2) 17" by 15" pieces (front and back) (2) 17" by 6" pieces (sides) (1) 15" by 6" piece (base) (1) 15" by 9" piece (flap) (2) 3 1/2" by 26" pieces (straps) Apply fusible fleece to the wrong sides of each body piece. Using 2 Fat Quarters cut: (4) 22" by 3" strips(4) 19" by 3" strips Your cut pieces will look like this: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Your backpack is complete and ready for school!

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