background preloader

Misty Forest

Misty Forest
Related:  PLANTS

Flower Skeleton design by I&S BBDO ad agency In the terrifying wake of 2011 the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan, funerals become a commonplace ordeal as the nation dealt with unprecedented loss. Like most cultures, Japanese funerals are somber affairs punctuated with black and white with any deviation considered taboo or inappropriate. Reflecting on the enormity of recent events, funeral home Nishinihon Tenrei approached Tokyo-based ad agency I&S BBDO to create an ad for a trade show that would buck the trend of muted colors so prevalent in the industry. The agency responded with this unprecedented figure of a skeleton made with pressed flowers that overtly celebrates the cycle of life by introducing color and elements of nature that are often avoided in such services. The image was considered so successful it went on to win a design merit award from the 2013 One Club Awards.

Animals illuminated by the sun The time of sunset is defined in astronomy as the moment when the trailing edge of the Sun’s disk disappears below the horizon in the west. There are few things in nature as photogenic as the sky at sunset, especially animals. The rich bright gold, pink and orange colors make unusually beautiful pictures of animals illuminated by the sun. Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source

La Push, WA Here are several images of some of the most iconic locations in the region. Bookshelf Porn 'Blow Up' by Ori Gersht Time After Time & Blow Up [2007] The large-scale photographs entitled Blow Up depict elaborate floral arrangements, based upon a 19th Century still-life painting by Henri Fantin-Latour, captured in the moment of exploding. Gersht´s compositions are literally frozen in motion, a process dependent on the ability of the advanced technology of photography to freeze-frame action. This visual occurrence, that is too fast for the human eye to process and can only be perceived with the aid of photography, is what Walter Benjamin called the ‘optical unconsciousness’ in his seminal essay ‘A Short History of Photography’. Flowers, which often symbolise peace, become victims of brutal terror, revealing an uneasy beauty in destruction.

Spectacular Images of the Insides of Musical Instruments March 9, 2012 at 6:14am | by AP These ads by Bjoern Ewers for the Berlin Philharmonic show the insides of orchestral instruments in such a way as to make it seem like we are standing in spacious halls (or in the case of the flute, a spacious tunnel)… Via: Boing Boing Like 9 Wows for daily content like this! Nature Sounds. Listen and download for free 'Exploding Flowers' by Qi Wei Gerbera We've all seen flowers beautifully displayed in our local market or flower shop, but never have we seen them exploding like this! Qi Wei is not a botanist but a curious photographer who, one day, came across Todd McLellan's Disassembly series. It got him thinking. "Todd McLellan's Disassembly shows a wonderful different viewpoint of man-made objects which inspired me to think if it could be applied to the natural world," Wei tells us. "Of course, the incredibly ordered world of flowers lend itself to this technique wonderfully. What did he learn from this experiment? Lily Carnation Chrysanthemum Orange Gerbera Peruvian Lily Red Rose #1 Red Rose #2 Untitled Purple Flower Sunflower "Petals, stamens and pistils are really like the individual brush strokes of nature, actual physical brush strokes that can be picked up and admired." Exploded Flowers

explorations with space : cole rise no.1 no.2 no.3 no.4 no.5 no.6 no.7 6 Breathing Exercises to Relax in 10 Minutes or Less You might also like 15 Easy Ways to Beat Anxiety Now READ Over-worked, under-slept, and feeling pressure like whoa? The Need-to-Know Don’t wait until fight-or-flight kicks in before minding the breath. Your Action Plan From the confines of a bed, a desk, or anywhere negativity finds its way, consider these six techniques to help keep calm and carry on. 1. How it’s done: Balance can do a body good, beginning with the breath. When it works best: Anytime, anyplace—but this is one technique that’s especially effective before bed. Level of difficulty: Beginner 2. How it’s done: With one hand on the chest and the other on the belly, take a deep breath in through the nose, ensuring the diaphragm (not the chest) inflates with enough air to create a stretch in the lungs. When it works best: Before an exam or any stressful event. 3. How it’s done: To nix tension from head to toe, close the eyes and focus on tensing and relaxing each muscle group for two to three seconds each. 4. 5. 6.

Extinct tree grows anew from ancient jar of seeds For thousands of years, Judean date palm trees were one of the most recognizable and welcome sights for people living in the Middle East -- widely cultivated throughout the region for their sweet fruit, and for the cool shade they offered from the blazing desert sun. From its founding some 3,000 years ago, to the dawn of the Common Era, the trees became a staple crop in the Kingdom of Judea, even garnering several shout-outs in the Old Testament. Judean palm trees would come to serve as one of the kingdom's chief symbols of good fortune; King David named his daughter, Tamar, after the plant's name in Hebrew. By the time the Roman Empire sought to usurp control of the kingdom in 70 AD, broad forests of these trees flourished as a staple crop to the Judean economy -- a fact that made them a prime resource for the invading army to destroy. In the centuries that followed, first-hand knowledge of the tree slipped from memory to legend. {*style:<b>*}Update: Break out the cigars!

Top 20 Earth Pictures found on Stumble Upon | Earth Pictures Everybody knows that Stumbleupon is an great source for beautiful photography, nature, pets, arts and much more. They have millions of users and they are probably the most wide used source for finding quality content. Today, we collected 20 popular photographs from Stumbleupon. Most of them have been seen for more than million times each. We hope you’ll enjoy… Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Photo Source Source Photo Source Source Suggested by ISSy; Source You don’t want to miss our new post: 20 Gorgeous Animal Photos. Check out more HERE.

Language of Flowers The language of flowers, sometimes called floriography, is a means of cryptological communication through the use or arrangement of flowers. Meaning has been attributed to flowers for thousands of years, and some form of floriography has been practiced in traditional cultures throughout Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. Plants and flowers are used as symbols in the Hebrew Bible — particularly of love and lovers in the Song of Songs,[1] as an emblem for the Israelite people[2] and for the coming Messiah[3] — and of Jesus Christ in the New Testament.[4] In Western Culture, William Shakespeare ascribed emblematic meanings to flowers, especially in Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. Interest in floriography soared in Victorian England and in the United States during the 19th century. History[edit] Floriography was popularized in France about 1810–1850, while in Britain it was popular during the Victorian age (roughly 1820–1880), and in the United States about 1830–1850. Meanings[edit] See also[edit]

Related: