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Warren Buffett

Warren Buffett
Buffett is called the "Wizard of Omaha" or "Oracle of Omaha",[8] or the "Sage of Omaha"[9] and is noted for his adherence to value investing and for his personal frugality despite his immense wealth.[10] Buffett is a notable philanthropist, having pledged to give away 99 percent[11] of his fortune to philanthropic causes, primarily via the Gates Foundation. On April 11, 2012, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer,[12] for which he successfully completed treatment in September 2012.[13] Early life Buffett's interest in the stock market and investing dated to schoolboy days he spent in the customers' lounge of a regional stock brokerage near his father's own brokerage office. On a trip to New York City at age ten, he made a point to visit the New York Stock Exchange. Business career By 1950, at 20, Buffett had made and saved $9,800 (over $96,000 inflation adjusted for the 2014 USD[29]).[30] In April 1952, Buffett discovered that Graham was on the board of GEICO insurance. As a millionaire Related:  NWO

Bill Gates William Henry "Bill" Gates III (born October 28, 1955) is an American business magnate, philanthropist, investor, computer programmer, and inventor.[3][4] Gates is the former chief executive and chairman of Microsoft, the world’s largest personal-computer software company, which he co-founded with Paul Allen. He is consistently ranked in the Forbes list of the world's wealthiest people[5] and was the wealthiest overall from 1995 to 2009—excluding 2008, when he was ranked third;[1] in 2011 he was the wealthiest American and the world's second wealthiest person.[6][7] According to the Bloomberg Billionaires List, Gates became the world's richest person again in 2013, a position that he last held on the list in 2007.[8] As of April 2014, he is the richest.[1] During his career at Microsoft, Gates held the positions of CEO and chief software architect, and remains the largest individual shareholder, with 6.4 percent of the common stock.[a] He has also authored and co-authored several books.

Eugenics While eugenic principles have been practiced as far back in world history as Ancient Greece, the modern history of eugenics began in the early 20th century when a popular eugenics movement emerged in Britain[8] and spread to many countries, including the United States and most European countries. In this period, eugenic ideas were espoused across the political spectrum. Consequently, many countries adopted eugenic policies meant to improve the genetic stock of their countries. Such programs often included both "positive" measures, such as encouraging individuals deemed particularly "fit" to reproduce, and "negative" measures such as marriage prohibitions and forced sterilization of people deemed unfit for reproduction. People deemed unfit to reproduce often included people with mental or physical disabilities, people who scored in the low ranges of different IQ tests, criminals and deviants, and members of disfavored minority groups. History[edit] Some, such as Nathaniel C. Ethics[edit]

Vaccine Jonas Salk in 1955 holds two bottles of a culture used to grow polio vaccines. A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe, its toxins or one of its surface proteins. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and keep a record of it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters. Vaccines can be prophylactic (example: to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g., vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine). The terms vaccine and vaccination are derived from Variolae vaccinae (smallpox of the cow), the term devised by Edward Jenner to denote cowpox. Effectiveness[edit] Types[edit]

World Economic Forum The organization also convenes some six to eight regional meetings each year in locations such as Latin America and East Asia, as well as undertaking two further annual meetings in China and the United Arab Emirates. Beside meetings, the foundation produces a series of research reports and engages its members in sector specific initiatives.[1] The 2011 annual meeting in Davos was held from 26 to 30 January. The 2012 meeting was held on 25–29 January 2012, with the theme "The Great Transformation: Shaping New Models".[2] The 2013 meeting was held from 23 January to 27 January, with the theme of "Resilient Dynamism," following founder Klaus Schwab's declaration that "the need for global cooperation has never been greater".[3] The 2014 meeting was held from 22 January to 25 January, with the theme "The Reshaping of the World: Consequences for Society, Politics and Business".[4] History[edit] Professor Klaus Schwab opens the inaugural European Management Forum in Davos in 1971

Human population control Human population control is the practice of artificially altering the rate of growth of a human population. Historically, human population control has been implemented with the goal of increasing the rate of population growth. In the period from the 1950s to the 1980s, concerns about global population growth and its effects on poverty, environmental degradation and political stability led to efforts to reduce population growth rates. Methods[edit] Population control may use one or more of the following practices although there are other methods as well: The method(s) chosen can be strongly influenced by the religious and cultural beliefs of community members. History[edit] Ancient times through Middle Ages[edit] A number of ancient writers have reflected on the issue of population. Confucius (551-478 BC) and other Chinese writers cautioned that, "excessive growth may reduce output per worker, repress levels of living for the masses and engender strife." 16th and 17th centuries[edit]

Chemtrail conspiracy theory A high-flying jet leaving a condensation trail (contrail) According to the chemtrail conspiracy theory, some trails left in the sky by high-flying aircraft are chemical or biological agents deliberately sprayed for sinister purposes undisclosed to the general public.[1] Believers in the theory argue that airplanes don't leave long-lasting contrails under normal conditions,[2] but their arguments have been dismissed by the scientific community: such trails are simply normal water-based contrails (condensation trails) which are routinely left by high-flying aircraft under certain atmospheric conditions.[3] Although proponents have attempted to prove that the claimed chemical spraying does take place, their analyses have been flawed or based on misconception.[4][5] Overview Multiple persistent contrails Contrails as chemtrails Contrails from propeller-driven aircraft engine exhaust, early 1940s Exhaust gases and emissions False evidence of chemtrails Ballast barrels in a prototype Boeing 747.

Global warming Global mean land-ocean temperature change from 1880 to 2014, relative to the 1951–1980 mean. The black line is the annual mean and the red line is the 5-year running mean. The green bars show uncertainty estimates. Source: NASA GISS. The map shows the 10-year average (2000–2009) global mean temperature anomaly relative to the 1951–1980 mean. Fossil fuel related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions compared to five of the IPCC's "SRES" emissions scenarios. Global warming and climate change can both refer to the observed century-scale rise in the average temperature of the Earth's climate system and its related effects, although climate change can also refer to any historic change in climate. Scientific understanding of the cause of global warming has been increasing. Climate model projections were summarized in the 2013 Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) by the IPCC. Observed temperature changes Temperature changes vary over the globe. Initial causes of temperature changes (external forcings)

Bilderberg Group The Bilderberg Group, Bilderberg conference, Bilderberg meetings or Bilderberg Club is an annual private conference of approximately 120 to 140 invited guests from North America and Europe, most of whom are people of influence.[1][2] About one-third are from government and politics, and two-thirds from finance, industry, labour, education and communications.[1] Origin[edit] The original conference was held at the Hotel de Bilderberg in Oosterbeek, Netherlands, from 29 to 31 May 1954. It was initiated by several people, including Polish politician-in-exile Józef Retinger, concerned about the growth of anti-Americanism in Western Europe, who proposed an international conference at which leaders from European countries and the United States would be brought together with the aim of promoting Atlanticism – better understanding between the cultures of the United States and Western Europe to foster cooperation on political, economic and defense issues.[3] Organizational structure[edit]

SV40 SV40 is an abbreviation for Simian vacuolating virus 40 or Simian virus 40, a polyomavirus that is found in both monkeys and humans. Like other polyomaviruses, SV40 is a DNA virus that has the potential to cause tumors, but most often persists as a latent infection. SV40 became a highly controversial subject after it was revealed that millions were exposed to the virus after receiving a contaminated polio vaccine produced between 1955 and 1961.[1] History[edit] The molecular mechanisms by which the virus reproduces and alters cell function were previously unknown, and research into SV40 vastly increased biologists' understanding of gene expression and the regulation of cell growth. Virology[edit] SV40 consists of an unenveloped icosahedral virion with a closed circular dsDNA genome of 5kb. Multiplicity Reactivation[edit] Transcription[edit] The early promoter for SV40 contains three elements. Theorized role in human disease[edit] p53 Damage and carcinogenicity[edit] See also[edit]

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