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Livius. Articles on Ancient History

Livius. Articles on Ancient History
The Livius.org website offers articles on ancient history. We are currently improving the site, which has more than 3650 pages. At the moment, there are 460 articles in the new style. You can search to find what you are looking for or browse through the articles using categories or tags. The pages that were most recently converted to the new style, are listed below. Map DataImagery ©2014 NASA, TerraMetrics

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Map Collections The Library of Congress Search by Keyword | Browse by Geographic Location Index | Subject Index | Creator Index | Title Index The Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress holds more than 4.5 million items, of which Map Collections represents only a small fraction, those that have been converted to digital form. The focus of Map Collections is Americana and Cartographic Treasures of the Library of Congress. These images were created from maps and atlases and, in general, are restricted to items that are not covered by copyright protection.

Secrets of Lost Empires Welcome to the companion Web site to the NOVA program "Roman Bath," scheduled for rebroadcast on January 31, 2006. In the film, which is a part of the NOVA series Secrets of Lost Empires, an international crew of archeologists, engineers, and historians designs, builds, and tests a functioning Roman bath in the Turkish countryside. Here's what you'll find online: A Day at the Baths Wander through the frigidarium, tepidarium, caldarium, and other vital rooms in our online reconstruction of the famous Baths of Caracalla. Construct an Aqueduct (Hot Science) The Emperor has appointed you Chief Water Engineer on an aqueduct-building project. To successfully ferry water from the hills, you'll need to learn when to use a tunnel or a covered trench, a wall, or an arcade.

Military Technology The Song period is a good point to take stock of China's military technology. First, warfare was central to the history of the period. The confrontation between the Song and the three successive non-Chinese states to the north (Liao, Jin, and Yuan) made warfare not only a major preoccupation for those in government service, but also a stimulus to rethinking major intellectual issues. Annenberg Media Exhibits: Collapse Hundreds of years ago in what is now modern Honduras, Copán was a thriving civilization, a center of the cultural life of the Maya. Tens of thousands of people made their home in the Copán Valley. Yet despite its importance, Copán went into decline. Across the vast territory of the ancient Maya, other important sites were sharing a similar fate.

Collapse: Why do civilisations fall? Hundreds of years ago in what is now modern Honduras, Copán was a thriving civilization, a center of the cultural life of the Maya. Tens of thousands of people made their home in the Copán Valley. Yet despite its importance, Copán went into decline. Across the vast territory of the ancient Maya, other important sites were sharing a similar fate. Classic Maya civilization was collapsing.

Hypogeum of Ħal-Saflieni The Hypogeum of Paola, Malta, (Ipoġew in Maltese) literally meaning "underground" in Greek, is a subterranean structure dating to the Saflieni phase (3000-2500 BC) in Maltese prehistory. Thought to have been originally a sanctuary, it became a necropolis in prehistoric times and the remains of more than 7,000 individuals have been found. It is the only known prehistoric underground temple in the world. The Hypogeum was depicted on a 2 cents 5 mils stamp issued in the Maltese Islands in 1980 to commemorate the acceptance by UNESCO of this unique structure in the World Heritage Site list. It was closed to visitors between 1992 and 1996 for restoration works; since it reopened only 60 people per day are allowed entry. It was discovered by accident in 1902 when workers cutting cisterns for a new housing development broke through its roof.

Rome Rome (/ˈroʊm/; Italian: Roma pronounced [ˈroːma] ( ); Latin: Rōma) is a city and special comune (named "Roma Capitale") in Italy. Rome is the capital of Italy and also of the Province of Rome and of the region of Lazio. With 2.7 million residents in 1,285.3 km2 (496.3 sq mi), it is also the country's largest and most populated comune and fourth-most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. The urban area of Rome extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of around 3.8 million.[2] Between 3.2 and 4.2 million people live in Rome metropolitan area.[3][4][5][6][7] The city is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, on the Tiber within Lazio (Latium). 100 Years of Conflict We compiled this piece to explain the key global events of the last 100 years to coincide with the centenary of World War One. We’ve used a variety of graphics, timelines and data visualisations to explain the chain link of events that lead us to global politics as they are today. If you want to make further suggestions on what we can work in, let us know on the comments. By 1914 Europe was divided by two major Alliance systems: The Triple Alliance between Germany, Austria Hungary and Italy and the Triple Entente, between France, Russia and Great Britain.

ChronoZoom ChronoZoom is an educational tool for teachers and students who want to put historical events in perspective. A great many resources have been created already in ChronoZoom for your enjoyment and enlightenment. Start Exploring Handy Man - Tools - Early Humans for Kids This early man lived in Africa. Early man did not have sharp claws or strong sharp teeth. He was not larger or stronger than other animals. He could not run like deer or antelope. So how did early man survive?

Related:  History