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Robot suit HALالبدلة الآلية تمكنك من رفع الاوزان الثقيلة جدا

Robot suit HALالبدلة الآلية تمكنك من رفع الاوزان الثقيلة جدا

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ysb-Oko3Bg

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The Omnivorous Mind — John S. Allen In this gustatory tour of human history, John S. Allen demonstrates that the everyday activity of eating offers deep insights into human beings’ biological and cultural heritage. We humans eat a wide array of plants and animals, but unlike other omnivores we eat with our minds as much as our stomachs. This thoughtful relationship with food is part of what makes us a unique species, and makes culinary cultures diverse. Not even our closest primate relatives think about food in the way Homo sapiens does. Introducing the Knowledge Graph: things, not strings Cross-posted on the Inside Search Blog Search is a lot about discovery—the basic human need to learn and broaden your horizons. But searching still requires a lot of hard work by you, the user. So today I’m really excited to launch the Knowledge Graph, which will help you discover new information quickly and easily. Take a query like [taj mahal].

The future of UI Synopsis It's 10 years since Minority Report hit our screens. The film's science adviser and inventor John Underkoffler demos g-speak – the real-life version of the eye-popping, tai chi-meets-cyberspace computer interface that Tom Cruise used to whoosh through video clips of future crimes. Is this how tomorrow's computers will be controlled? Four Types of Innovation and the Strategic Choices Each One Represents If you’re like me, you want your brainstorming sessions and new product development projects to be productive and you want the ideas you (and your team) come up with to be relevant to your business’ overall goals. That’s what this post will help you with – giving a guidance to your ideation/new product development efforts and some insight into how those ideas might fit into the overall plans of the business for the future. When coming up with a new idea, often it can be helpful to think through categories of ideas first.

untitled Source: Jouni A. Smed Introduction Top 100 Innovation Articles of 2014 We launched Innovation Excellence on August 1, 2011 and so 2014 was our third full year of operations. To celebrate we’ve pulled together the Top 100 Innovation Articles of 2014 from our archive of over 7,000 innovation-related articles from more than 400 contributing authors. Click the link if you missed the last two years’ lists: We do some other rankings too. At the beginning of each month we will profile the twenty posts from the previous month and we also publish a weekly Top 8 as part of our Innovation Excellence Weekly email and FREE MAGAZINE, so an annual Top 100 seems like a logical fit. Did your favorite make the cut? 5 Mind-Blowing Projects by College Kids College graduates may still have a tough time finding a decent job in this economy, but some students are trying to make the best use of their time in the classroom. We've rounded up five mind-blowing projects by college kids for your viewing enjoyment. Continue reading to see more.

Top 10 Student Inventions You don't have to be a famous researcher or engineer to come up with the next big invention. These ten student projects prove just that. They range from a homemade nuclear reactor to a 300mph electric vehicle. The Three Breakthroughs That Have Finally Unleashed AI on the World A few months ago I made the trek to the sylvan campus of the IBM research labs in Yorktown Heights, New York, to catch an early glimpse of the fast-arriving, long-overdue future of artificial intelligence. This was the home of Watson, the electronic genius that conquered Jeopardy! in 2011. The original Watson is still here—it’s about the size of a bedroom, with 10 upright, refrigerator-shaped machines forming the four walls. The tiny interior cavity gives technicians access to the jumble of wires and cables on the machines’ backs.

Rare Color Footage of Depression-Era New York In the same year that The Wizard of Oz hurtled Dorothy from a black-and-white Kansas into a Technicolor Oz, Jean Vivier, a French tourist, was filming the streets of New York in all of their own glorious color. A rare 16-mm Kodachrome film from the summer of 1939 that was recently released by the Italian Romano Archives shows swinging signs advertising 5¢ piña coladas, elevated trains whizzing overhead, and boys playing in the fountain of a public park. Archivist Vincente Romano says the clips of Rockefeller Center, Chinatown, and other areas are only a portion of the film Vivier took over the course of his trip from Marseilles to the Big Apple at the close of the Great Depression.

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