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Visual Math Learning: A Free Online Tutorial for Teaching Math

Visual Math Learning: A Free Online Tutorial for Teaching Math

http://www.visualmathlearning.com/

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8 math talks to blow your mind Mathematics gets down to work in these talks, breathing life and logic into everyday problems. Prepare for math puzzlers both solved and unsolvable, and even some still waiting for solutions. Ron Eglash: The fractals at the heart of African designs When Ron Eglash first saw an aerial photo of an African village, he couldn’t rest until he knew — were the fractals in the layout of the village a coincidence, or were the forces of mathematics and culture colliding in unexpected ways? Virtual Math Lab - College Algebra If you need help in college algebra, you have come to the right place. Note that you do not have to be a student at WTAMU to use any of these online tutorials. They were created as a service to anyone who needs help in these areas of math.

Ten Myths About Mathematics Education And Why You Shouldn't Believe Them By Karen Budd, Elizabeth Carson, Barry Garelick, David Klein, R. James Milgram, Ralph A. Raimi, Martha Schwartz, Sandra Stotsky, Vern Williams, and W. Stephen Wilson (affiliations and more), in association with New York City HOLD and Mathematically Correct, two education advocacy organizations of parents, mathematicians, and K-12 educators. What is Mathematics: Gödel's Theorem and Around. Incompleteness. By K. Podnieks what is mathematics, logic, mathematics, foundations, incompleteness theorem, mathematical, Gödel, Godel, book, Goedel, tutorial, textbook, methodology, philosophy, nature, theory, formal, axiom, theorem, incompleteness, online, web, free, download, teaching, learning, study, student, Podnieks, Karlis Personal page - click here. Visiting Gödel Places in Vienna, December 2012 K.Podnieks. Frege’s Puzzle from a Model-Based Point of View.

TSST Mathematics Course Strand F: AlgebraIntroductory ProblemF1: FormulaeF2: Algebraic ConceptsF3: Algebraic ManipulationF4: Solving Quadratic EquationsF5: Solving EquationsF6: Solving Inequalities Strand G: Relations, Functions and GraphsIntroductory ProblemG1: CoordinatesG2: Straight LinesG3: Using Graphs to Solve EquationsG4: Functions Strand H: Angle GeometryIntroductory ProblemH1: Angles and SymmetryH2: Angles, Circles and TangentsH3: Constructions and LociH4: Congruence and Similarity Strand I: Geometry and TrigonometryIntroductory ProblemI1: Pythagoras' Theorem and Trigonometric RatiosI2: Trigonometric Problems Strand J: Transformations, Vectors and MatricesIntroductory ProblemJ1: Reflections, Rotations and EnlargementsJ2: Further TransformationsJ3: VectorsJ4: Matrices

Another Look at Prime Numbers Primes are numeric celebrities: they're used in movies, security codes, puzzles, and are even the subject of forlorn looks from university professors. But mathematicians delight in finding the first 20 billion primes, rather than giving simple examples of why primes are useful and how they relate to what we know. Somebody else can discover the "largest prime" -- today let's share intuitive insights about why primes rock: Primes are building blocks of all numbers. 3D Shapes . Intro We live in a three-dimensional world. Every object you can see or touch has three dimensions that can be measured: length, width, and height. The room you are sitting in can be described by these three dimensions. The monitor you're looking at has these three dimensions. Even you can be described by these three dimensions.

Zipf, Power-law, Pareto - a ranking tutorial Lada A. Adamic Information Dynamics Lab Information Dynamics Lab, HP Labs Palo Alto, CA 94304 A line appears on a log-log plot. PreAlgegra Chapter 1 Whole Numbers 1-1 Introducing Whole Numbers1-2 Naming Numbers1-3 Rounding Whole Numbers1-4 Adding Whole Numbers1-5 Subtracting Whole Numbers1-6 Multiplying Whole Numbers1-7 Dividing Whole Numbers1-8 Comparing Whole-Number Values1-9 Ordering Operations with Whole Numbers.1-10 Factoring Chapter 2 Integers 2-1 Introducing Integers2-2 Comparing Integer Values2-3 Introducing Absolute Values2-4 Adding Signed Integers2-5 Subtracting Signed Integers2-6 Combining Integer Addition and Subtraction2-7 Multiplying Signed Integers2-8 Dividing Signed Integers2-9 Combining Integer Multiplication and Division Chapter 3 Fractions

Euclid's Elements, Introduction Euclid's Elements form one of the most beautiful and influential works of science in the history of humankind. Its beauty lies in its logical development of geometry and other branches of mathematics. It has influenced all branches of science but none so much as mathematics and the exact sciences. The Elements have been studied 24 centuries in many languages starting, of course, in the original Greek, then in Arabic, Latin, and many modern languages. I'm creating this version of Euclid's Elements for a couple of reasons. Against All Odds: Inside Statistics 1. What Is Statistics? Statistics is the art and science of gathering, organizing, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. And without rudimentary knowledge of how it works, people can't make informed judgments and evaluations of a wide variety of things encountered in daily life.

Leaner Fourier Transforms By Helen Knight, MIT New algorithm can separate signals into their individual frequencies using a minimal number of samples. The fast Fourier transform, one of the most important algorithms of the 20th century, revolutionized signal processing. The algorithm allowed computers to quickly perform Fourier transforms — fundamental operations that separate signals into their individual frequencies — leading to developments in audio and video engineering and digital data compression. But ever since its development in the 1960s, computer scientists have been searching for an algorithm to better it. RWM103: Geometry Making sure that objects are of equal size is important in life. Whether pieces of furniture, automobiles, or just pieces of a candy bar shared between siblings, we often have to make sure objects are the same size and shape. Have you ever had to prove something to a child?

Braess’ Paradox – or Why improving something can make it worse On Earth Day in 1990 they closed New York’s 42nd Street for the parade[1] and in 1999 one of the three main traffic tunnels in South Korea’s capital city was shut down for maintenance[2]. Bizarrely, despite both routes being heavily used for traffic, the result was not the predicted chaos and jams, instead the traffic flows improved in both cases. Inspired by their experience, Seoul’s city planners subsequently demolished a motorway leading into the heart of the city and experienced exactly the same strange result, with the added benefit of creating a 5-mile long, 1,000 acre park for the local inhabitants[3]. It is counter-intuitive that you can improve commuters’ travel times by reducing route options: after all planners normally want to improve things by adding routes.

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