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Celts

Celts
Diachronic distribution of Celtic peoples: core Hallstatt territory, by the 6th century BC maximal Celtic expansion, by 275 BC Lusitanian area of Iberia where Celtic presence is uncertain The Celts (/ˈkɛlts/, occasionally /ˈsɛlts/, see pronunciation of Celtic) or Kelts were an ethnolinguistic group of tribal societies in Iron Age and Medieval Europe who spoke Celtic languages and had a similar culture,[1] although the relationship between the ethnic, linguistic and cultural elements remains uncertain and controversial. The earliest undisputed direct examples of a Celtic language are the Lepontic inscriptions, beginning in the 6th century BC.[6] Continental Celtic languages are attested almost exclusively through inscriptions and place-names. Names and terminology Continental Celts are the Celtic-speaking people of mainland Europe and Insular Celts are the Celtic-speaking peoples of the British and Irish islands and their descendants. Origins Overview of the Hallstatt and La Tène cultures: Related:  new docscurriculum

Germanic peoples The Germanic peoples (also called Teutonic, Suebian or Gothic in older literature) are[1] an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group of Northern European origin, identified by their use of the Germanic languages which diversified out of Proto-Germanic starting during the Pre-Roman Iron Age.[2] The term "Germanic" originated in classical times, when groups of tribes were referred to using this term by Roman authors. For them, the term was not necessarily based upon language, but rather referred to tribal groups and alliances who were considered less civilized, and more physically hardened, than the Celtic Gauls living in the region of modern France. Tribes referred to as Germanic in that period lived generally to the north and east of the Gauls. Ethnonym Germanic The Latin ethnonym "Germani" seems to be attested in the Fasti Capitolini inscription for the year 222 BCE – de Galleis Insvbribvs et Germ(aneis) – where it may simply refer to "related" peoples, namely related to the Gauls.

Coffee Time Challenges As many of you know, I proudly work at facebook. 1) Two Bases Challenge: Find three digits X, Y and Z such that XYZ in base10 (ten) is equal to ZYX in base9 (nine)? Click for hint There are more elegant ways to solve it, but the solution set is so small, you might as well just brute force it. Click for solution 2) One Million Challenge: Write 1,000,000 as the product of two numbers; neither of which contains any zeroes. What are the prime factors? 3) High Product Challenge: Use the digits 0-9 to create two numbers. Bigger numbers go at the front. 4) Exactly a third Challenge: Arrange the numerals 1-9 into a single fraction that equals exactly 1/3 (one third). 5823 / 17469 or 5832 / 17496 5) Three dice Challenge: I roll three dice, and multiply the three numbers together. You should be able to do this without a computer! 6) Word Doc Challenge: I open up a Word document and type all the numbers 1-10000, separated by spaces, (I did not use any 'thousands' punctuation; just raw numbers). 7) Legs 28 dogs

List of timelines From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This is a list of timelines currently on Wikipedia. §Types[edit] §General timelines[edit] §History[edit] §Arts[edit] §Biographical timelines[edit] §Crime[edit] §Events[edit] §Disasters[edit] §Economics[edit] §Entertainment[edit] §Environmental issues[edit] §Fiction[edit] §Geographical timelines[edit] Timeline of country and capital changes §Ancient civilizations[edit] §Extant civilizations[edit] §Supranational entities and regions, peoples[edit] §Sovereign states[edit] §Subnational regions and cities, narrow timelines[edit] §Law[edit] §Military[edit] §Military conflicts[edit] §Philosophy[edit] §Politics[edit] §Religion[edit] §Ayyavazhi[edit] Timeline of Ayyavazhi history (1809–present) §Buddhism[edit] Timeline of Buddhism (563 BCE – present) §Christianity[edit] §Islam[edit] §Jainism[edit] Timeline of Jainism §Judaism[edit] §Sikhism[edit] Sikh Gurus (1469–1666) §Science[edit] §Astronautics and planetary science[edit] §Astronomy, Astrophysics, and Cosmology[edit] §Biology[edit] §Sports[edit]

liste légions romaines This is a list of Roman legions, including key facts about each legion, primarily focusing on Principate (early Empire, 27 BC - 284 AD) legions, for which there exists substantial literary, epigraphic and archaeological evidence. Until the 1st century BC, legions were temporary citizen levies, raised for specific campaigns and disbanded after them. By the early 1st century BC, legions were mixed volunteer/conscript units. Legions became standing units, which could remain intact long after a particular campaign was finished. Large numbers of new legions were raised by rival warlords for the civil wars of the period 49-31 BC. However, when Augustus became sole ruler in 31 BC, he disbanded about half of the over 50 legions then in existence. During the Dominate (late Empire, 284–476), legions were also professional, but are little understood due to scarcity of evidence compared to the Principate. Late Republican legions[edit] Early Empire legions[edit] Code for Roman provinces in the table:

10 Books that Screwed Up The World Books Books are one of our greatest resources, but many times in history books have been written which are misleading or untrue. In some cases this has lead to widescale death and destruction and evil governmental regimes. This is a list of ten of the worst books of this type – books that have done more harm than good. The common thread in all of these books is deception – invariably not intentional, but the consequences are the same regardless. I have intentionally left off some of the more obvious choices – as they will almost certainly come up in the comments. Malleus Maleficarum Heinrich Kramer and Jacob Sprenger, 1486 On the list because: It inflamed witch hunts across Europe Malleus Maleficarum (The Hammer of Witchraft) was a manual for witch hunters and judges to catch witches and stamp them out. Coming of Age in Samoa Margaret Mead, 1928 On the list because: it turned out to be a creation of her own sexual confusions and aspirations The Prince Niccolò Machiavelli, 1532 Mein Kampf Unknown

History of the world World population[1] from 10,000 BCE to 2,000 CE. The vertical (population) scale is logarithmic. The history of the world is the history of humanity, beginning with the Paleolithic Era. Distinct from the history of the Earth (which includes early geologic history and prehuman biological eras), world history comprises the study of archaeological and written records, from ancient times on. Outside the Old World, including ancient China[27] and ancient India, historical timelines unfolded differently. Prehistory[edit] Early humans[edit] Genetic measurements indicate that the ape lineage which would lead to Homo sapiens diverged from the lineage that would lead to chimpanzees (the closest living relative of modern humans) around five million years ago.[30] It is thought that the Australopithecine genus, which were likely the first apes to walk upright, eventually gave rise to genus Homo. Rise of civilization[edit] Ancient history[edit] Timeline[edit] Cradles of civilization[edit]

Misogyny Misogyny /mɪˈsɒdʒɪni/ is the hatred or dislike of women or girls. Misogyny can be manifested in numerous ways, including sexual discrimination, denigration of women, violence against women, and sexual objectification of women.[1][2] Misogyny has been characterised as a prominent feature of the mythologies of the ancient world as well as of various religions. In addition, many influential Western philosophers have been described as misogynistic.[1] The counterpart of misogyny is misandry, the hatred or dislike of men; the antonym of misogyny is philogyny, the love or fondness of women. Definitions According to sociologist Allan G. Misogyny .... is a central part of sexist prejudice and ideology and, as such, is an important basis for the oppression of females in male-dominated societies. Sociologist Michael Flood, at the University of Wollongong, defines misogyny as the hatred of women, and notes: Classical Greece In his book City of Sokrates: An Introduction to Classical Athens, J.W.

Free Online Student Organizer | Schoolbinder Timeline Prehistory For events dating from the formation of the planet to the rise of modern humans see: Timeline of natural historyFor events dating from the first appearance of Homo sapiens to before the invention of writing see: Timeline of human prehistory These timelines of world history detail recorded events since the creation of writing roughly 5000 years ago (which marks the beginning of history) to the present day. For events from c. 3500 BC to c. 500 AD see: Timeline of ancient historyFor events from c. 500 to 1499, see: Timeline of the Middle AgesFor events from 1500 to 1900, see: Timeline of early modern historyFor events since 1901, see: Timeline of modern history Future

Jainism Jainism (/ˈdʒeɪnɪzəm/[1] or /ˈdʒaɪnɪzəm/[2]), traditionally known as Jin Sashana or Jain dharma (Sanskrit: जैन धर्म), is an Indian religion that prescribes a path of nonviolence (ahimsa) towards all living beings. Practitioners believe that nonviolence and self-control are the means by which they can obtain liberation. The three main principles of Jainism are non-violence (ahimsa), non-absolutism (anekantavada) and non-possessiveness (aparigraha). Followers of Jainism take 5 major vows: non-violence, non-lying, non-stealing, chastity, and non-attachment. Jainism is derived from the word Jina (conqueror) referring to a human being who has conquered inner enemies like attachment, desire, anger, pride, greed, etc. and possesses infinite knowledge (Kevala Jnana). Doctrine[edit] Non-violence (ahimsa)[edit] The hand with a wheel on the palm symbolizes Ahimsa (nonviolence). In addition to other humans, Jains extend the practice of nonviolence towards all living beings. Non-absolutism[edit]

21 GIFs That Explain Mathematical Concepts “Let's face it; by and large math is not easy, but that's what makes it so rewarding when you conquer a problem, and reach new heights of understanding.” Danica McKellar As we usher in the start of a new school year, it’s time to hit the ground running in your classes! Math can be pretty tough, but since it is the language in which scientists interpret the Universe, there’s really no getting around learning it. Check out these gifs that will help you visualize some tricky aspects of math, so you can dominate your exams this year. Ellipse: Via: giphy Solving Pascal triangles: Via: Hersfold via Wikimedia Commons Use FOIL to easily multiply binomials: Via: mathcaptain Here’s how you solve logarithms: Via: imgur Use this trick so you don’t get mixed up when doing matrix transpositions: Via: Wikimedia Commons What the Pythagorean Theorem is really trying to show you: Via: giphy Exterior angles of polygons will ALWAYS add up to 360 degrees: Via: math.stackexchange Via: imgur Via: Wikimedia Commons Via: reddit

History Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.[1] History (from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation")[2] is the study of the past, particularly how it relates to humans.[3][4] It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events. Scholars who write about history are called historians. History can also refer to the academic discipline which uses a narrative to examine and analyse a sequence of past events, and objectively determine the patterns of cause and effect that determine them.[5][6] Historians sometimes debate the nature of history and its usefulness by discussing the study of the discipline as an end in itself and as a way of providing "perspective" on the problems of the present.[5][7][8][9] Etymology Ancient Greek ἱστορία[12] (historía) means "inquiry","knowledge from inquiry", or "judge".

Does Your Cambodian Girlfriend Dream About Snakes? | Khmer440.com May 10, 2009GavinMac I spent a lot of time with a Cambodian woman last week. I came back to the U.S. yesterday, and today she called me to report that last night she had a dream about snakes. She thinks it means that someone loves her and soon she will get married. She not too subtly suggested that “someone” means “me.” Of course, at first I thought she was out of her mind. www.postcolonialweb.org/morocco/literature/sarhrouny/10.html ”In various cultures, actually, the snake connotes sexuality. www.khmerlife.com/Forum/Thread.aspx? ”…the legend true? This information concerns me because I’m really not ready to get married to anyone. www.vireak.net/2006/12/10/snake-dream-a-khmer-myth/ ”Snake, snake, what could an encounter with this deadly creature possibly bring any good luck? www.khmer.cc/community/t.c? This interpretation that snake dreams immediately precede meeting your true love (not follow meeting your true love) is supported by persuasive authority from a neighboring jurisdiction:

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