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A home for your writing — Hello Poetry Dear Young Me, Dear Young Me, I still don't know what the hell to tell you. -Older Me. I miss you.. -sincerely, me Tell him that you love him and that he did make a difference. -Forever Missing Remember that all good things take time. -A more patient self Dear Young Know It All Me, Listen to your older sister when she tells you to run from him. -Love, Older Still Learning Me he's not worth it. i promise you. don't feel stupid because you did nothing wrong. just move on and focus on the one right in front of you who has been there all along. -a heartbroken you When you've got a guy who's your been your best friend for 3 years; marry him as soon as you can. -The Heartbroken "Mature" You Everything really does happen for a reason, even though to this day you still might not know what that reason was. -Content Me

6 Logical Fallacies That Cost You Money Every Day Throws Good Money After Bad The competitive instinct is not just a phrase football commentators invented to give words to the tingly feeling they get watching Brett Favre play football. Our brain's natural tendency towards competition is arguably the reason your family survived the hunter gatherer knife fight of 2000 BC. And as countless uninspired armies and poorly coached teams have demonstrated throughout the years, your ability to compete tends to be directly proportional to your ability to convince yourself that you're doing the right thing. This leaves us with a brain that loves to compete, and is awesome at convincing itself that it's right. In the financial realms, when these two instincts collide, your brain will play a retarded game of chicken with reality that economists have termed "irrational escalation of commitment". This applies to more than finances Throw in a little competitive instinct and pride, and it's not hard to see how this can go horribly, horribly wrong.

11 Ways to Cure Someday Syndrome | zen habits Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Alex Fayle of the Someday Syndrome blog. Someday Syndrome: not doing what you want to because you don’t know what it is, because you’re procrastinating about it, or because you have too much stuff getting in your way. Everyone suffers from Someday Syndrome at some point in their lives, often catching it repeatedly. For me, most recently, I’d been saying that I really should give running a try without doing anything about it. You probably have something similar going on in your life – a project, a task, a goal – that you just haven’t got around to doing yet. I could quote Nike and say: Just Do It, but if it were that simple Someday Syndrome wouldn’t exist. I decided that here had to be an easier way than waiting for pain to push me into getting over myself and getting on with my goals. 1. Maybe you’re not doing something because in reality, it doesn’t fit with who you are. 2. 3. 4. I have a goal of running 20K next November. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Kurt Vonnegut explains drama I was at a Kurt Vonnegut talk in New York a few years ago. Talking about writing, life, and everything. He explained why people have such a need for drama in their life. He said, “People have been hearing fantastic stories since time began. The problem is, they think life is supposed to be like the stories. Let's look at a few examples.” He drew an empty grid on the board, like this: Time moves from left to right. He said, “Let's look at a very common story arc. It starts with her awful life with evil stepsisters, scrubbing the fireplace. “People LOVE that story! He wiped the board clean and said, “Now let's look at another popular story arc: the disaster.” It's an ordinary day in an ordinary town. But the problem is, life is really like this... Our lives drifts along with normal things happening. “But because we grew up surrounded by big dramatic story arcs in books and movies, we think our lives are supposed to be filled with huge ups and downs! That's why people invent fights.

Poems and Sonnets Sonnet What love isn't Edna St Vincent Millay A Summer Sonnet A seasonal twist on the Bard. by Romana Machado, an interesting net celebrity as it happens Time compressed caught by a friend of mind, Kyle Parrish. Summons Robert Francis thinks it's not such a bad thing to be woken up to look at the sky. Valentine A rhyming little charm. by Donald Hall. To His Coy Mistress The Rolling Stones have it wrong: time ain't on our side. A Short poem about the heart of The City by Elise Paschen One Art The Art of Losing by Elizabeth Bishop- found taped to a door at Tuft's english department An Exercise in Sadness A study in the other side of romance. Love Poem (for T) A longing tribute Jenny Mueller Psalm 183 A religion of eros Joseph Zitt, found on the Net One Can on human feeling and foliage, David Ignatow, from 'The Prose Poem: An International Journal Volume 3' Memory's a Traitor A brief poem M.A. Theory A well know poem by Dorothy Parker, who can say more in 4 lines than anyone. Baby, It's You I Won't Send Roses

38 Life Lessons I've Learned in 38 Years | zen habits - StumbleUpon 30 Of The Hardest (But Most Necessary) Things That Must Be Done To Achieve Su... Success is defined differently for everyone; however, facing difficulties on the road to success is a common denominator for anyone pursuing his or her passions. What separates those who see their dreams through and those who don’t is the ability to do what others will not. Everyone can dream of eventual success, but accomplishing one’s goals requires taking on the difficult tasks and functions for which many people do not have the courage or stamina. Winston Churchill said, “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts.” Taking on the hard tasks time and time again is what defines a person’s character and generates the most rewarding results. Here are the 30 hardest things you need to do to be successful: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.Turn the complex into simple, so people can best share your vision. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Photo credit: Shutterstock

The Particle Zoo: Subatomic Particle plushies I love LOLcats. I love physics. Mix the two together and I CAN'T STAND IT! 39 Ways to Live, and Not Merely Exist “The proper function of man is to live – not to exist.” — Jack LondonToo often we go through life on autopilot, going through the motions and having each day pass like the one before it.That’s fine, and comfortable, until you have gone through another year without having done anything, without having really lived life.That’s fine, until you have reached old age and look back on life with regrets. That’s fine, until you see your kids go off to college and realize that you missed their childhoods. It’s not fine. If you want to truly live life, to really experience it, to enjoy it to the fullest, instead of barely scraping by and only living a life of existence, then you need to find ways to break free from the mold and drink from life. What follows is just a list of ideas, obvious ones mostly that you could have thought of yourself, but that I hope are useful reminders. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. I hope you are finding these suggestions useful. 19. 23.

Do not stand at my grave and weep — Poet Seers Mary Frye (November 13, 1905 – September 15, 2004) was a Baltimore housewife and florist, best known as the author of the poem ‘Do not stand at my grave and weep’, written in 1932. She was orphaned at the age of three and moved to Baltimore when she was twelve. She was an avid reader with a remarkable memory. The identity of the author of the poem was unknown until the late 1990s, when Frye revealed that she had written it. Poem by Mary Frye – Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep Related some history of Do Not Stand at my Grave and Weep Handbook for Life: 52 Tips for Happiness and Productivity | zen habits - StumbleUpon By Leo Babauta This is something I’ve been wanting to write for some time — a Handbook for Life. Now, is there any handbook that can be a guide to every single person? Of course not. This is just a list of tips that I think will help many people in life — some of them common-sense tips that we often forget about. Consider this guide a reminder. It’ll also become apparent from the links in this handbook that I’ve written about this stuff before. How to use this handbook This handbook is not meant to be a step-by-step guide, nor should you adopt all the tips below. Pick and choose the tips that will be most useful to you. 52 Tips for Happiness and Productivity Try rising early.

40 Ways to Let Go and Feel Less Pain “If you let go a little, you will have a little peace. If you let go a lot, you will have a lot of peace.” ~Ajahn Chah Eckhart Tolle believes we create and maintain problems because they give us a sense of identity. Perhaps this explains why we often hold onto our pain far beyond its ability to serve us. We replay past mistakes over and over again in our head, allowing feelings of shame and regret to shape our actions in the present. Though it may sound simple, Ajahn Chah’s advice speaks volumes. There will never be a time when life is simple. Let Go Of Frustration with Yourself/Your Life 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Let go of Anger and Bitterness 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Let Go Of Past Relationships 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Let Go Of Stress 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. It’s a long list, but there’s much left to be said! Photo by Katie Romanova

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