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Uriel

Uriel
Uriel (אוּרִיאֵל "El/God is my light", Auriel/Oriel (God is my light) Standard Hebrew Uriʾel, Tiberian Hebrew ʾÛrîʾēl) is one of the archangels of post-Exilic Rabbinic tradition, and also of certain Christian traditions. In Judaism and Christianity[edit] Name and origins[edit] Uriel is often identified as a cherub and angel of repentance.[4] He "stands at the Gate of Eden with a fiery sword",[5] or as the angel who "watches over thunder and terror".[6] In the Apocalypse of Peter he appears as the Angel of Repentance, who is graphically represented as being as pitiless as any demon. He checked the doors of Egypt for lamb's blood during the plague. In Thomas Heywood's Hierarchy of Blessed Angels (1635), Uriel is described as an Angel of the Earth. At the Council of Rome of 745, Pope St. In the first half of the 11th century Bulgarian followers of the dualist heresy called Bogomilism who lived in the dukedom of Ahtum in present day Banat invoked Uriel in rituals. In Enoch[edit] Amen[14] Related:  Angels and Demons

Raphael (archangel) Raphael (Standard Hebrew רָפָאֵל, Rāfāʾēl, "It is God who heals", "God Heals", "God, Please Heal") is an archangel of Judaism and Christianity, who in the Judeo-Christian tradition performs all manners of healing. In Islam, Raphael is the same as Israfil. Raphael is mentioned in the Book of Tobit, which is accepted as canonical by Catholics, Orthodox, and some Anglo-Catholics, and as useful for public teaching by Lutherans and Anglicans. Raphael is generally associated with the angel mentioned in the Gospel of John as stirring the water at the healing pool of Bethesda. The angels mentioned in the Torah, the older books of the Hebrew Bible, are without names. Raphael is named in several Jewish apocryphal books (see below). Raphael bound Azazel under a desert called Dudael according to Enoch 10:4–6: And again the Lord said to Raphael: 'Bind Azazel hand and foot, and cast him into the darkness: and make an opening in the desert, which is in Dudael, and cast him therein. Tobias and the Angel

Anak Anak (/ˈeɪˌnæk/; Heb. 'nq spelt as both ענק and as הענק depending upon the reference) was a well-known figure during the conquest of Canaan by the Israelites who, according to the Book of Numbers, was a forefather of the Anakites[1][2] (Heb. Anakim) who have been considered "strong and tall," they were also said to have been a mixed race of giant people, descendants of the Nephilim (Numbers 13:33). The use of the word "nephilim" in this verse describes a crossbreed of God's sons and the daughters of man, as cited in (Genesis 6:1-2) and (Genesis 6:4). The sons of Anak are first mentioned in Numbers 13. The Anakites are later mentioned briefly in the books of Deuteronomy, Joshua, and Judges. See also[edit] References[edit]

Demon In Ancient Near Eastern religions as well as in the Abrahamic traditions, including ancient and medieval Christian demonology, a demon is considered an unclean spirit, sometimes a fallen angel, the spirit of a deceased human, or a spirit of unknown type which may cause demonic possession, calling for an exorcism. In Western occultism and Renaissance magic, which grew out of an amalgamation of Greco-Roman magic, Jewish demonology and Christian tradition,[2] a demon is a spiritual entity that may be conjured and controlled. Terminology[edit] The Greek term does not have any connotations of evil or malevolence. In fact, εὐδαιμονία eudaimonia, (literally good-spiritedness) means happiness. The supposed existence of demons remains an important concept in many modern religions and occultist traditions. Psychological archetype[edit] M. By tradition[edit] Ancient Near East[edit] Mesopotamia[edit] Human-headed winged bull, otherwise known as a Lamassu Ancient Arabia[edit] Hebrew Bible[edit]

Samael Samael (Hebrew: סמאל‎) (also Sammael or Samil) is an important archangel in Talmudic and post-Talmudic lore, a figure who is accuser, seducer and destroyer, and has been regarded as both good and evil. It is said that he was the guardian angel of Esau and a patron of the Roman empire. In Judaism[edit] In Jewish lore, Samael is said to be the angel of death, the chief ruler of the Fifth Heaven and one of the seven regents of the world served by two million angels; he resides in the Heaven. According to The Ascension of Moses[2] Samael is also mentioned as being in 7th Heaven: In the last heaven Moses saw two angels, each five hundred parasangs in height, forged out of chains of black fire and red fire, the angels Af, "Anger," and Hemah, "Wrath," whom God created at the beginning of the world, to execute His will. It is also said that the Baal Shem once summoned Samael, to make him do his bidding.[4] In Gnosticism[edit] In anthroposophy[edit] References[edit] Bunson, Matthew, (1996).

Samyaza Samyaza (Aramaic: שמיחזה, Greek: Σεμιαζά) also Semihazah, Shemyazaz, Shemyaza, Sêmîazâz, Semjâzâ, Samjâzâ, Semyaza, and Shemhazai is a fallen angel of apocryphal Jewish and Christian tradition that ranked in the heavenly hierarchy as one of the Grigori (meaning "Watchers" in Greek). The name 'Shemyaza[z]' means 'infamous rebellion', the combination of 'shem' [meaning 'name' or 'fame' {whether positive or negative}] + 'azaz' [which means 'rebellion' or 'arrogance' as a negative particle]. Michael Knibb lists him as “the (or my) name has seen” or “he sees the name”. Possible identification outside of the Book of Enoch[edit] Some suggest that Samyaza is most likely another name for Satan (Heb: 'the adversary'), who was originally an entity created in the service of God; he was the caretaker of God's throne, but later fell from the heavens because of his pride according to some Abrahamic traditions. Sins of Samyaza and his associates[edit] Notes[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

Satan Satan (Hebrew: שָּׂטָן satan, "adversary,"[1]) is a term, later a character appearing in the texts of the Abrahamic religions[2][3] who personifies evil and temptation, and is known as the deceiver that leads humanity astray. The term is often applied to an angel who fell out of favor with God, seducing humanity into the ways of sin, and who now rules over the fallen world. Satan is primarily understood as an "accuser" or "adversary" in the Hebrew Bible, and is not necessarily the personification of evil that he would become in later Abrahamic religions. In the New Testament, Satan is a name that refers to a decidedly malevolent entity (devil) who possesses demonic god-like qualities. In Theistic Satanism, Satan is considered a positive force and deity who is either worshipped or revered. In LaVeyan Satanism, Satan is regarded as holding virtuous characteristics.[4][5] Judaism Hebrew Bible Thirteen occurrences Job ch.1–2 (10x),[8]Zechariah 3:1–2 (3x).[9] Book of Job Second Temple period

Archangel An archangel /ˌɑrkˈeɪndʒəl/ is an angel of high rank. Beings similar to archangels are found in a number of religious traditions; but the word "archangel" itself is usually associated with the Abrahamic religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Some branches of the faiths mentioned have identified a group of seven Archangels, but the actual angels vary, depending on the source. Raphael, Gabriel, and Michael are always mentioned; the other archangels vary, but most commonly include Uriel as well, who is mentioned in the book 2 Esdras. The word archangel is derived from the Greek ἀρχάγγελος (arch- + angel, literally chief angel).[2] In Judaism[edit] There are no explicit references to archangels in the canonical texts of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). In Christianity[edit] Guido Reni's Archangel Michael Trampling Satan, 1636. Roman Catholic[edit] In Roman Catholicism, three are honoured by name: GabrielMichaelRaphael Eastern and Oriental Orthodox[edit] Protestant[edit]

Koinonia House - The Ministry of Chuck and Nancy Missler Watcher (angel) Watching angel on the spire of St Michael's church, Clifton Hampden, Oxfordshire, England In the Book of Daniel 4:13, 17, 23[4] there are three references to the class of "watcher, holy one" (watcher, Aramaic `iyr; holy one, Aramaic qaddiysh). The term is introduced by Nebuchadnezzar who says he saw "a watcher, a holy one come down (singular verb) from heaven." He describes how in his dream the watcher says that Nebuchadnezzar will eat grass and be mad and that this punishment is "by the decree of the Watchers, the demand by the word of the Holy Ones" - "the living may know that the Most High rules in the kingdom of men." After hearing the king's dream Daniel considers for an hour and then responds: Lutheran Protestant reformer Johann Wigand viewed the watcher in Nebuchadnezzar's dream as either God himself, or the Son of God. The use of the term "Watchers" is common in the Book of Enoch. The chiefs of tens, listed in the Book of Enoch, are as follows:

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