background preloader

Visual language

Visual language
A visual language is a system of communication using visual elements. Speech as a means of communication cannot strictly be separated from the whole of human communicative activity that includes the visual[1] and the term 'language' in relation to vision is an extension of its use to describe the perception, comprehension and production of visible signs. Overview[edit] An image that dramatizes and communicates an idea presupposes the use of a visual language. Just as people can 'verbalize' their thinking, they can 'visualize' it. A diagram, a map, and a painting are all examples of uses of visual language. The elements in an image represent concepts in a spatial context, rather than the linear form used for words. Visual Language[edit] Visual units in the form of lines and marks are constructed into meaningful shapes and structures or signs. Imaging in the mind[edit] Meaning and expression[edit] Perception[edit] The sense of sight operates selectively. Innate structures in the brain[edit] Related:  Persuasion

Iconography Iconography is the branch of art history which studies the identification, description, and the interpretation of the content of images: the subjects depicted, the particular compositions and details used to do so, and other elements that are distinct from artistic style. The word iconography comes from the Greek εἰκών ("image") and γράφειν ("to write"). A secondary meaning (based on a non-standard translation of the Greek and Russian equivalent terms) is the production of religious images, called icons, in the Byzantine and Orthodox Christian tradition; that is covered at Icon. Iconography as a field of study[edit] Foundations of iconography[edit] Early Western writers who took special note of the content of images include Giorgio Vasari, whose Ragionamenti, interpreting the paintings in the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, reassuringly demonstrates that such works were difficult to understand even for well-informed contemporaries. Twentieth-century iconography[edit]

Visualization (computer graphics) See also Information graphics Visualization or visualisation is any technique for creating images, diagrams, or animations to communicate a message. Visualization through visual imagery has been an effective way to communicate both abstract and concrete ideas since the dawn of man. Examples from history include cave paintings, Egyptian hieroglyphs, Greek geometry, and Leonardo da Vinci's revolutionary methods of technical drawing for engineering and scientific purposes. Visualization today has ever-expanding applications in science, education, engineering (e.g., product visualization), interactive multimedia, medicine, etc. Charles Minard's information graphic of Napoleon's march Computer graphics has from its beginning been used to study scientific problems. Apart from the distinction between interactive visualizations and animation, the most useful categorization is probably between abstract and model-based scientific visualizations.

Visual thinking Visual thinking, also called visual/spatial learning, picture thinking, or right brained learning, is the phenomenon of thinking through visual processing. Visual thinking has been described as seeing words as a series of pictures.[citation needed] It is common in approximately 60%–65% of the general population. "Real picture thinkers", those persons who use visual thinking almost to the exclusion of other kinds of thinking, make up a smaller percentage of the population. Research by child development theorist Linda Kreger Silverman suggests that less than 30% of the population strongly uses visual/spatial thinking, another 45% uses both visual/spatial thinking and thinking in the form of words, and 25% thinks exclusively in words. According to Kreger Silverman, of the 30% of the general population who use visual/spatial thinking, only a small percentage would use this style over and above all other forms of thinking, and can be said to be 'true' "picture thinkers". Linguistics[edit]

Psychological manipulation Psychological manipulation is a type of social influence that aims to change the perception or behavior of others through underhanded, deceptive, or even abusive tactics.[1] By advancing the interests of the manipulator, often at another's expense, such methods could be considered exploitative, abusive, devious, and deceptive. Social influence is not necessarily negative. For example, doctors can try to persuade patients to change unhealthy habits. Requirements for successful manipulation[edit] According to psychology author George K. concealing aggressive intentions and behaviors.knowing the psychological vulnerabilities of the victim to determine what tactics are likely to be the most effective.having a sufficient level of ruthlessness to have no qualms about causing harm to the victim if necessary. Consequently, the manipulation is likely to be accomplished through covert aggressive (relational aggressive or passive aggressive) means.[2] How manipulators control their victims[edit]

Symbolism (arts) Distinct from, but related to, the style of literature, symbolism of art is related to the gothic component of Romanticism. The term "symbolism" is derived from the word "symbol" which derives from the Latin symbolum, a symbol of faith, and symbolus, a sign of recognition, in turn from classical Greek συμβόλον symbolon, an object cut in half constituting a sign of recognition when the carriers were able to reassemble the two halves. In ancient Greece, the symbolon, was a shard of pottery which was inscribed and then broken into two pieces which were given to the ambassadors from two allied city states as a record of the alliance. The symbolist poets have a more complex relationship with Parnassianism, a French literary style that immediately preceded it. While being influenced by hermeticism, allowing freer versification, and rejecting Parnassian clarity and objectivity, it retained Parnassianism's love of word play and concern for the musical qualities of verse.

List of thought processes Nature of thought[edit] Thought (or thinking) can be described as all of the following: An activity taking place in a: brain – organ that serves as the center of the nervous system in all vertebrate and most invertebrate animals (only a few invertebrates such as sponges, jellyfish, adult sea squirts and starfish do not have a brain). It is the physical structure associated with the mind. mind – abstract entity with the cognitive faculties of consciousness, perception, thinking, judgement, and memory. Types of thoughts[edit] Content of thoughts[edit] Types of thought (thinking)[edit] Listed below are types of thought, also known as thinking processes. Animal thought[edit] See Animal cognition Human thought[edit] Human thought Classifications of thought[edit] Williams' Taxonomy Creative processes[edit] Creative processes – Decision-making[edit] Decision-making Erroneous thinking[edit] see Error for some examples, see also Human error) Emotional intelligence (emotionally based thinking)[edit] Reasoning –

19 Outstanding Words You Should Be Working Into Conversation There are some of our favorite words that appeared in mental_floss stories in 2011. Some are foreign words. Others come from medical dictionaries. And there's a surprising amount of hobo slang. Have fun working these into conversation this holiday season! Gene Lee / Shutterstock.com 1. 2. 3. 4. milliHelen: The quantity of beauty required to launch just one ship. 5. 6. 7. 8. © Joe Giron/Corbis 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Thanks to Stacy Conradt, Adrienne Crezo, Bill DeMain, Haley Sweetland Edwards, Jamie Spatola, Ethan Trex and a reader named John .

THE OVERHAULING OF STRAIGHT AMERICA -  By Marshall Kirk and Erastes Pill THE OVERHAULING OF STRAIGHT AMERICA By Marshall Kirk and Erastes Pill The first order of business is desensitization of the American public concerning gays and gay rights. To desensitize the public is to help it view homosexuality with indifference instead of with keen emotion. Ideally, we would have straights register differences in sexual preference the way they register different tastes for ice cream or sports games: she likes strawberry and I like vanilla; he follows baseball and I follow football. No big deal. At least in the beginning, we are seeking public desensitization and nothing more. The principle behind this advice is simple: almost any behavior begins to look normal if you are exposed to enough of it at close quarters and among your acquaintances. The way to benumb raw sensitivities about homosexuality is to have a lot of people talk a great deal about the subject in a neutral or supportive way. And when we say talk about homosexuality, we mean just that. "... "... Or "...

Ancient Symbols, meanings of symbols from Ancient Egyptian, Celtic, Greek, etc. Logical Fallacies» Appeal to Authority Explanation An appeal to authority is an argument from the fact that a person judged to be an authority affirms a proposition to the claim that the proposition is true. Appeals to authority are always deductively fallacious; even a legitimate authority speaking on his area of expertise may affirm a falsehood, so no testimony of any authority is guaranteed to be true. However, the informal fallacy occurs only when the authority cited either (a) is not an authority, or (b) is not an authority on the subject on which he is being cited. Example (1) Marilyn vos Savant says that no philosopher has ever successfully resolved the problem of evil. This argument is fallacious because Marilyn vos Savant, though arguably an authority, is not an authority on the philosophy of religion.

Style and Figures of Speech - Understanding Figurative Language - Writing Persuasive Prose Education Grammar & Composition Share this page on: Send to a Friend via Email Your suggestion is on its way! An email with a link to: was emailed to: Thanks for sharing About.com with others! Most Emailed Articles Weight lost made easierHow Jurassic Park Lied to Us About Dinosaur CloningCan Animals Sense Natural Disasters? Style & Figures of Speech By Richard Nordquist Style and rhetoric are ancient arts--of persuasion, expression, and effective communication--that are just as valuable to writers today as they were to students in ancient Greece and Rome. Figures of Speech Aristotle may be 2,500 years old--but his writings on rhetoric are still relevant today. Writing With Style Learn how to become a more versatile and imaginative writer. Pros on Prose Major writers of the past and present discuss reading, writing, and the English language. Advertisement See more newsletters More from the WebSponsored Content by nRelate The Next Big IPO?

homosexual_propaganda.pdf Advertising research Advertising research is a specialized form of marketing research conducted to improve the efficiency of advertising. History[edit] 1879 - N. 1895 - Harlow Gale of the University of Minnesota mails questionnaires to gather opinions about advertising from the public.[1] 1900s - George B. 1910s - 1911 can be considered the year marketing research becomes an industry. 1920s - In 1922, Dr. 1930s - In 1936, Dr. 1940s - Post World War II, the U.S. sees a large increase in the number of market research companies.[4] 1950s - Market researchers focus on improving methods and measures. 1960s - Qualitative focus groups gain in popularity.[6] In addition, some advertisers call for more rigorous measurement of the in-market effectiveness of advertising in order to provide better accountability for the large amounts being spent on advertising. 1970s - Computers emerge as business tools, allowing researchers to conduct large-scale data manipulations. Types of advertising research[edit] Pre-testing[edit]

Top 20 Figures of Speech - Figurative Language - Definitions and Examples of Figures of Speech By Richard Nordquist Updated September 22, 2015. A figure of speech is a rhetorical device that achieves a special effect by using words in distinctive ways. You will probably remember many of these terms from your English classes. But the fact is, whether we're conscious of it or not, we use figures of speech every day in our own writing and conversations. For example, common expressions such as "falling in love," "racking our brains," "hitting a sales target," and "climbing the ladder of success" are all metaphors--the most pervasive figure of all. Using original figures of speech in our writing is a way to convey meanings in fresh, unexpected ways. continue reading below our video Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% For advice on creating figures of speech, see Using Similes and Metaphors to Enrich Our Writing. How to Review the Top 20 Figures of SpeechClick on each of the following terms to visit a glossary page. After studying these figures, test your knowledge at: The Top 20 Figures

Related: