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MIT Researchers are Printing Solar Cells on Sheets of Paper 

MIT Researchers are Printing Solar Cells on Sheets of Paper 
Published on August 20, 2011 by admin · No Comments Geek.com Solar power is a great alternative energy source, but it’s unfortunately a rather expensive one. However, researchers at MIT are working on a new and less-expensive way to make solar cells which involves printing them directly on to fabric or paper. We’re not talking about any fancy paper or fabrics. The MIT researchers discovered the printing process works on just about any paper, from regular printer paper, to tissue paper, and even to already-printed newspaper. It’s a much easier method than the current one, which needs super high-temperature liquids at several hundred degrees Celsius to create the cells. The substrate of the current method is usually glass and requires a number of other components that are expensive and result in a heavy, rigid object – and that’s not even taking into account the installation costs. Read Entire Article HERE

http://truthisscary.com/2011/08/mit-researchers-are-printing-solar-cells-on-sheets-of-paper/

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