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40 Alternative Assessments for Learning

40 Alternative Assessments for Learning
When people think of assessment, pencils and bubble sheets may be the first things that come to mind. Assessment does not always have to involve paper and pencil, but can instead be a project, an observation, or a task that shows a student has learned the material. In the end, all we really want to know is that the skill was mastered, right? Why not make it fun and engaging for students as well? Many teachers shy away from alternative assessments because they take extra time and effort to create and to grade. On the other hand, once the assessment guidelines and grading rubric are created, it can be filed away and used year after year. The project card and rubric can be run on card stock (one on each side of the page), laminated, and hole punched with other alternative assessment ideas. Here are 40 alternative assessment ideas to get you started! Alternative Reading Assessments 1. Create a bookmark to match the theme of the last book read. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Alternative Writing Assessments

http://www.teachhub.com/40-alternative-assessments-learning

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22 Easy Formative Assessment Techniques for Measuring Student Learning I came across Terry Heick’s blog – 10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds – at TeachThought from earlier this year and really enjoyed the formative assessment strategies that he outlined. Using formative assessment techniques in class – or “simple assessments” as Terry calls them – are easy to administer and provide the instant feedback teachers need to identify which students need more help, and then adjust their instruction and lesson plans to help them. Visit Terry’s blog above to get more detail on the following ten formative assessment techniques: 1. New Clothes 2.

Assessment Design: A Matrix To Assess Your Assessments Assessment Design: A Matrix To Assess Your Assessments by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education On Rigor, Language, & Verbs Rigor is not established by the unthinking use of Webb or Bloom or other verbs. Here, for example, is a widely-findable chart I found on the NJ Dept of Education website, in which Webb’s rubrics have been turned into a leveled chart of supposedly-appropriate verbs:

UPDATE: 36 Digital Formative Assessment Tools for the Classroom If you’ve followed our blog here at Teach Learn Grow, you know that we’re a huge proponent of formative assessment. There is no shortage of formative assessment techniques available to teachers to use in their classroom. They provide teachers the valuable feedback they need to adjust their teaching so student learning moves forward. Add to the many techniques the digital tools available these days in smartphones and tablets, and formative assessment becomes easier than ever to implement. The Most Important Question Every Assessment Should Answer The Question Every Assessment Should Be Able To Answer by Terry Heick The difference between assessment of learning and assessment for learning is a crucial one, in many ways indicative of an important shift in education. Traditionally, tests have told teachers and parents how a student “does,” then offers a very accessible point of data (usually percentage correct and subsequent letter grade) that is reported to parents as a performance indicator. Class data can be gathered to imply instructional effectiveness, and the data from multiple classrooms can be combined to suggest the performance of an entire school, but a core message here is one of measurement and finality: this is how you did.

All About Inquiry-Based Learning Inquiry-based learning is not a new teaching strategy. In fact, you most likely learned about it in college while studying about John Dewey’s educational reform. Dewey set out to advocate child-centered learning that was based on inquiry and real-world experiences. Unfortunately, in today’s educational system, children are less likely to inquire and ask questions, and more likely to be subservient and listen. Inquiry-based learning is meant to change that.

Formative Assessments Are Easier Than You Think! When I was teaching science one of the best lessons I learned was about formative assessment. In my first year of teaching I taught the way I was told to teach. Deliver content to my students, assess at the end, remediate if necessary. 20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day 20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day by Saga Briggs The ultimate goal of teaching is understanding.

Socrative Teacher Reviews Engage, assess and personalize your class with Socrative! Educators can initiate formative assessments through quizzes, quick question polls, exit tickets and space races all with their Socrative Teacher app. Socrative will instantly grade, aggregate and provide visuals of results to help you identify opportunities for further instruction. Save time and visualize student understanding when it matters, now! To get started using Socrative, simply register for a Socrative Teacher account. Your Socrative account will work with other Socrative Apps and via all browsers at Socrative.com. DERN Personalised learning, reflection, collaboration and .critical thinking are highly valued in education, and classroom practices are changing towards learning as a collaborative activity. Exploration is encouraged and fostered; however, assessment is still following a traditional path – heavily dependent on summative assessment. A short paper, by Phillipa Whiteford, titled The times are a-changing: A New Model for Senior Secondary Assessment explores how a more ‘future-focused’ application of an ePortfolio can provide an innovative solution to the challenges facing current assessment practice in senior secondary education. The author builds a strong argument for the need to align assessment to teaching practices, referencing research on new teaching practices and assessment, and pointing out a need for integrative assessment which combines both assessment for and of learning based on continuous feedback, guidance and reflection (p.66). [1] Fullan, M. & Miles, M. (1992). Research Report:

Classroom Management: Using Gaming Elements Gamification is a term you may have heard in passing, but probably like most of us, are unsure what exactly it means. Simply put, gamification involves using the principles of classroom games to motivate and engage students. We all know that children love video games, and we can see that these game designers really know how to hook our children. So, why wouldn’t we be interested in incorporating some of the bells and whistles that designers use as part of our own classroom games and classroom management tactics? If you think about it, we as adults use one of the elements in gamification probably every day that we go to a store and use our rewards card. What makes you keep going back and getting your coffee card punched?

How do we assess understanding? Part of my role as Teaching and Learning Coordinator involves facilitating and supporting the planning of units of inquiry. Planning for inquiry can be difficult. On the one hand, over planning limits the potential for inquiry. On the other hand, we have desired outcomes and understandings, as well as the demands of a national curriculum.

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