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Slangopedia: Slangordbok, slanglexikon, slangord, sköna ord, ordbok, uttryck och talesätt

Slangopedia: Slangordbok, slanglexikon, slangord, sköna ord, ordbok, uttryck och talesätt

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Related:  British life and cultureSpråksociologipierrekamarea

TeachingEnglish In this lesson students practise word building in preparation for part 3 of the Use of English test in the FCE exam. Through a series of activities students will become more aware of word ‘families’, enabling them to do the Use of English (part 3) more successfully. Topic: Weird museums - word building for FCE Use of English part 3 Level: B2 Aims:

75 Simple British Slang Phrases You Should Probably Start Using Oh, the Brits. No-one can snark quite like they do, and there are certain turns of phrase that are so utterly delightful, the rest of the world really should sit up and take note. Below are just a few common British phrases that you might like to work into your daily vernacular, as they can pepper any conversation with a little extra something. British Slang If you’re planning on visiting London in the future, you might just want to familiarise yourself with some British Slang expressions that are very commonly used by the British. They will be very useful particularly if you’re likely to be socialising with Londoners. 1. “Mind The Gap”

Dr Ciaran O'Keeffe: Six reasons why we should celebrate Halloween - Dr Ciaran O'Keeffe Reverend J John argues today that far from being a harmless celebration, Halloween celebrates evil and trivialises death and deformity. He says it subverts messages we would usually wish to promote - such as warning children not to take sweets from strangers - and glorifies everything that is evil and unpleasant. But I am here to step in and defend Halloween as something frivolously fun that deserved to be celebrated. Here's why... 1.

Cohesive Devices When sentences, ideas, and details fit together clearly, readers can follow along easily, and the writing is coherent. The ideas tie together smoothly and clearly. To establish the links that readers need, you can use the methods listed here. Let's talk about the UK (still with Scotland) At the beginning of the new school year teachers usually explain to their students what they are going to study. Sometimes efl teachers not only teach grammar but also British culture, so one of the first cultural topics they discuss with their students are the geography of the UK and its form of government. Here you can find an interactive mindmap, a digital poster and a collection of useful websites, just to simplify the work. Click on the Glogster digital poster below, you will find general information about the United Kingdom and some videos.

Synonyms for the 96 most commonly used words in English Amazing — incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger — enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry — mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed

FASTEN SEAT BELTS 2 - Travel by Continent - Europe Fasten Seat Belts, a light hearted guide to avoid misunderstandings while travelling. An innovative way to learn languages and pick up cultural tips. Travel by Continent / Europe Cohesion: linking words and phrases 1.33 Cohesion: linking words and phrases You can use words or short phrases which help to guide your reader through your writing, and to link sentences, paragraphs and sections both forwards and backwards. Good use will make what you have written easy to follow; bad use might mean your style is disjointed, probably with too many short sentences, and consequently difficult to follow. Your mark could be affected either way.

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