background preloader

How to Keep Kids Engaged in Class

How to Keep Kids Engaged in Class
Have you ever plunked yourself down in a staff meeting where some of your colleagues were, for lack of a better phrase, not paying attention? Grading homework? Having private conversations? Texting? As we know all too well, kids aren't a whole lot different than adults: If they aren't absorbed by what's going on, they'll find something else that interests them. Getting all your students focused, eager, and on task at the beginning of class is challenging enough. Still, unless you manage to capture and keep students' focus, whether at the beginning of or midway through class, the engine of student learning that you are trying to drive simply isn't even in gear. From Dead Time to Active Learning I call this lack of engagement dead time. I have come to feel that dead time is so pernicious that I will do everything I can to prevent even the hint of an outbreak. They call students at Level 4, the lowest level, the work avoiders, and on level 3 are the halfhearted workers. Building Your Arsenal

http://www.edutopia.org/classroom-student-participation-tips

Related:  za predavanjaEngagement

20 Incredible TED Talks You Should Show Your High School Students What makes TED such an appealing web series and organization is its desire to offer up a little something for everyone. This includes high school students and the teachers who love, hate, or tolerate them. Honestly, pretty much any video hosted there boasts its own educational value, but some hold more relevance than others. Whether they empower and inspire, shine a light on social injustices or simply show off some seriously cool innovations, the following 20 videos are bound to make class time just a little more interesting. Viktor Frankl: Why to believe in othersFrom TED’s Best of the Web series comes a fabulous lecture by influential psychiatrist, philosopher, and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl.

Golden Rules for Engaging Students in Learning Activities When we think of student engagement in learning activities, it is often convenient to understand engagement with an activity as being represented by good behavior (i.e. behavioral engagement), positive feelings (i.e. emotional engagement), and, above all, student thinking (i.e. cognitive engagement) (Fredricks, 2014). This is because students may be behaviorally and/or emotionally invested in a given activity without actually exerting the necessary mental effort to understand and master the knowledge, craft, or skill that the activity promotes. In light of this, research suggests that considering the following interrelated elements when designing and implementing learning activities may help increase student engagement behaviorally, emotionally, and cognitively, thereby positively affecting student learning and achievement.

Science Fair Projects This is selection of ideas for 1st grade science fair projects with short project descriptions or examples as well as links to the actual science fair projects. Some of this ideas could also be used for 2nd and 3rd grades (and vice versa). Also some second grade science project ideas and third grade project ideas could be used in the first grade so check them out. At this age science projects resemble either simple games or magic tricks. Then unlike the magician you should try to explain what's going on. Hands-on Activities for Teaching Biology to High School or Middle School Students by Drs. Ingrid Waldron and Jennifer Doherty, University of Pennsylvania The expression "hands-on, minds-on" summarizes the philosophy we have incorporated in these activities - namely, that students will learn best if they are actively engaged and if their activities are closely linked to understanding important biological concepts. Many of our activities are explicitly aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards, as indicated by (NGSS) in the descriptions below and the links to the right. Additional information is provided in Summary Tables and in the Teacher Preparation Notes for these activities.

10 Mind-Blowing Experiments That Will Change The Way You Understand Yourself Why do we do the things we do? Despite our best attempts to “know thyself,” the truth is that we often know astonishingly little about our own minds, and even less about the way others think. As Charles Dickens once put it, “A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.”

Center for Teaching and Learning Research has demonstrated that engaging students in the learning process increases their attention and focus, motivates them to practice higher-level critical thinking skills and promotes meaningful learning experiences. Instructors who adopt a student-centered approach to instruction increase opportunities for student engagement, which then helps everyone more successfully achieve the course’s learning objectives. Flipping the classroom A pedagogy-first approach to teaching in which in-class time is re-purposed for inquiry, application and assessment in order to better meet the needs of the individual learners. Employing inclusive teaching strategies Inclusive teaching means teaching in ways that do not exclude students, accidentally or intentionally, from opportunities to learn.

Online Creative Writing Courses Offered Free by Top Universities and Educational Websites Getting Educated for Free 1. Introductory Courses Introduction to Creative Writing - University of Utah Course Creative Writing 101 - Eight Lesson Suite101 Course Intro to Creative Writing - Eight Week Course from the Crafty Writer Creative Writing Workshop - Four Lesson Suite 101 Course Writing What You Know - Introductory Course from the UK's Open University 2. 100 Intro Open Courses on Everything You've Ever Wanted to Learn Posted on Wednesday May 12, 2010 by Staff Writers While the classes you take through an online college are a great resource, you can augment your learning by taking some time to see what entirely free courses are out there offered by universities. Taking these courses can be a great way to get a foundation of knowledge or expand on what you already know.

How I’ll Engage My Students as Learners: Six Ways to Make Connections As the beginning of the school year gets underway I ask myself this question: What learning environment will I provide so that my students can’t wait ’til the next class? I believe that every person is unique and every child can learn, but I recognize that students learn best when engaged — where expectations are appropriately challenging within an environment that is both safe and that contributes to the dignity and self-worth of all. Students respond to encouragement and to a structuring of time and activities that reinforces their striving to meet and exceed those expectations while at the same time recognizing their increasing capacity to manage responsibility and independence. I also believe that engagement depends on quality interactions resulting from connections that happen inside and outside of the classroom.

Global Warming April 5 , 2004 Could global warming turn Earth's climate upside down? Thunderous tornadoes demolish Los Angeles. Bowling-ball size hailstones rain down on Tokyo. Creative Homework Assignments Can Motivate Students Teachers can make homework more meaningful by giving students interesting and motivating assignments. It’s easy to get into a routine in which you give students the same type of homework each week. There’s usually a spelling packet and math worksheets involved. While these types of homework assignments serve a purpose, there are ways to incorporate additional activities to make learning at home a little more meaningful and interesting.

Educational Leadership:Teaching for Understanding:How To Engage Students in Learning To help teachers formulate their own definitions of understanding, I typically ask them about their deepest interest or intellectual passion, something they feel particularly articulate about, are in control of, and are good at. Most teachers are able to define a set of ideas, a theme, or a particular event they say they genuinely understand, not just know about. It is toward such understanding that all teaching should be aimed—toward something students can hold on to beyond the Friday test, the final exam, and school itself. As part of my research for the Teaching for Understanding Project, I have asked students of all ages and levels of academic success to describe those occasions in educational settings when they were most engaged intellectually.

Related: