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Crap Detection 101 - City Brights: Howard Rheingold

Crap Detection 101 - City Brights: Howard Rheingold
“Every man should have a built-in automatic crap detector operating inside him.” Ernest Hemingway, 1954 The answer to almost any question is available within seconds, courtesy of the invention that has altered how we discover knowledge – the search engine. Materializing answers from the air turns out to be the easy part – the part a machine can do. The real difficulty kicks in when you click down into your search results. At that point, it’s up to you to sort the accurate bits from the misinfo, disinfo, spam, scams, urban legends, and hoaxes. Unless a great many people learn the basics of online crap detection and begin applying their critical faculties en masse and very soon, I fear for the future of the Internet as a useful source of credible news, medical advice, financial information, educational resources, scholarly and scientific research. Today, just as it was back then, “Who is the author?” Use the following methods and tools to protect yourself from toxic badinfo. Resources:

http://blog.sfgate.com/rheingold/2009/06/30/crap-detection-101/

Related:  Digital & media literacyEducation OnlineInformation Ethics - Includes ITEC websitesByte Sized Potential

Releases Horizon Project Strategic Brief on Digital Literacy A new report, supported by Adobe, aims to establish a shared vision of digital literacy and serve as a call to action for higher education leaders across the United States. The New Media Consortium (NMC) has released Digital Literacy: An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief in conjunction with the 2016 EDUCAUSE Annual Conference. Commissioned by Adobe, the special report explores the advancement of digital literacy, which is sparking new thinking in higher education about how to best prepare students for the demands of the global technological economy. This project was launched because there is a lack of consensus across the field about how to define digital literacy and implement effective programs. A survey was disseminated throughout the NMC community of higher education leaders and practitioners to understand how digital literacy initiatives are impacting their campuses.

United Nations University United Nations University in Tokyo The United Nations University (国際連合大学, Kokusairengōdaigaku?), (UNU), established in 1973, is the academic and research arm of the United Nations. It is headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, with diplomatic status as a UN institution. Since 2010, UNU has been authorized by the UN General Assembly to grant degrees. It also provides a bridge between the UN and the international academic, policy-making and private sector communities. The CRAP test for evaluating sources I frequently blog about evaluating sources— it was the subject of my very first post–so it should come as no surprise that I liked “Crap Detection, A 21st Century Literacy” from the Libraries and Transliteracy blog, which I found through the Librarian in Black. I wanted to point out two great items featured in the post: Howard Rheingold’s “Crap Detection 101,” and the librarian-created CRAP test for evaluating sources based on “Currency, Reliability, Authority and Purpose/Point of View”: CurrencyHow recent is the information?How recently has the website been updated?Is it current enough for your topic?Reliability What kind of information is included in the resource?

Are Your Students Digitally Safe? 15+ Resources Posted by Shelly Terrell on Sunday, December 29th 2013 Included in the Digital Tips Advent Calendar and part of the Effective Technology Integration category “We all need someone who inspires us to do better than we know how.” ~ Anonymous Technology has changed the way we interact with the world and each other. 0:06Skip to 0 minutes and 6 secondsLISA HARRIS: This week, we're going to be looking at how social media can be used professionally. And this is in terms of finding a job or a charity, for example, that wants to raise money on a very limited marketing budget. We're going to be looking at things like paying it forward and the importance of digital literacies. 650 Free Online Courses from Top Universities Get 1200 free online courses from the world's leading universities -- Stanford, Yale, MIT, Harvard, Berkeley, Oxford and more. You can download these audio & video courses (often from iTunes, YouTube, or university web sites) straight to your computer or mp3 player. Over 30,000 hours of free audio & video lectures, await you now.

Chucking the Checklist: A Contextual Approach to Teaching Undergraduates Web-Site Evaluation Find using OpenURL Buy This Issue Chucking the Checklist: A Contextual Approach to Teaching Undergraduates Web-Site Evaluation Abstract This paper criticizes the checklist model approach (authority, accuracy, objectivity, currency, coverage) to teaching undergraduates how to evaluate Web sites. Welcome, Educators Administrators and teachers are urgently looking for a proven system that will guide them through the complexities of Web 2.0. Too often, events like cyberbullying, sexting, plagiarizing and hacking push litigious chaos into the forefront of technology adoption, essentially stunting the development of digital citizenship progress. In response to this real and palpable need, iKeepSafe offers you these resources: Dive Into Data Privacy and Security • iKeepSafe Privacy: builds confidence around how technology companies are handling student data. • Digital Compliance and Student Privacy: A Roadmap for Schools: Outlines steps to implementing privacy and security compliance programs. • Data Privacy and Schools: Outlining the Conversation: Examines challenges related to managing data privacy and security in schools. • General Overview and Positioning Paper: iKeepSafe and Data Security: Discusses security protections for data collected by educational institutions. Brush Up on Hot Topics

Goals and Learning Objectives There are four goals for metaliterate learners, each of which includes a number of learning objectives. While some of the the metaliteracy goals echo long-valued information literacy principles, others are new, reflecting today’s evolving information environment. Most of the specific learning objectives range much further afield from traditional information literacy, providing outcomes that could be applied in a range of educational settings. These learning objectives recognize that metaliterate “learners,” as they are called here, must learn continually, given the constantly and rapidly evolving information landscape. Instructors and learners can meet these objectives in a variety of ways, depending on the learning context, choosing from a menu of learning activities. The objectives are conceived broadly, so as to remain scalable, reproducible, and accessible in a range of contexts.

Internet History Sourcebooks Project Internet History Sourcebooks Project Paul Halsall, Editor Last Modified: Dec 11 | linked pages may have been updated more recently The Internet History Sourcebooks Project is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted historical texts presented cleanly (without advertising or excessive layout) for educational use. 1. This project is both very large and fairly old in Internet terms. At the time it was instigated (1996), it was not clear that web sites [and the documents made available there] would often turn out to be transient.

First-Year Seminar Program About the Module The CRAAP Test module helps students learn the difference between appropriate and inappropriate sources for papers and bibliographies by prompting them to evaluate five basic elements of the sources: Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy, and Purpose. Our hope is that this module will help your FSEM students find appropriate academic sources, thus enhancing their research. Below is an introductory video for the CRAAP module. Importing the Module The CRAAP module can be easily imported into your FSEM’s Canvas course.

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